Current Geological Survey News and Events

Current Geological Survey News and Events, Geological Survey News Articles.
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'Problem of missing ice' finally solved by movement of the earth's crust
An international team of scientists published a study in Nature Communications today. This new reconstruction revolutionizes what is thought about the global continental ice mass during the Last Ice Age. (2021-02-23)

Study finds COVID risk communication targeting younger adults may have biggest impact
A study of adults in the United States finds that - broadly speaking - the older you are, the more concerned you are about COVID-19, and the more steps you take to reduce your risk from COVID-19. The study suggests that the biggest boost in risk reduction would stem from communication efforts aimed at raising awareness of COVID-19 risks among U.S. adults under the age of 40. (2021-02-23)

Parents of children with cancer have additional worries during COVID
The COVID-19 pandemic has heaped additional financial strains, childcare complications and other problems on already-burdened caregivers of children diagnosed with cancer, according to a study from researchers at Duke Health and other institutions. (2021-02-22)

Magnetic reversal 42,000 years ago triggered global environmental change
Nearly 42,000 years ago, when Earth's magnetic fields reversed, this triggered major environmental changes, extinction events, and long-term changes in human behavior, a new study reports. (2021-02-18)

Fish diet heats up marine biodiversity hotspot
A never-before-seen biodiversity pattern of coral reef fishes suggests some fishes might be exceptionally vulnerable to environmental change. It highlights, for the first time, a unique link between the diet and distribution of species across the marine realm. (2021-02-17)

Health survey conveys messages on how we should live
The questions in a health survey aimed at young people raise issues of status and convey norms about what people should own and how they should be. This is according to a study from Linköping University. The results have been published in the journal Children & Society. (2021-02-16)

Survey: Cleaning product use affecting asthma more during COVID-19 measures
Those with asthma are experiencing less asthma control related to an increase in using household disinfectants -- known asthma triggers -- because of COVID-19, according to a survey co-conducted by University of Illinois Chicago researchers. (2021-02-10)

Home office: Majority supports the new regulation
The occupational health and safety regulation regarding the coronavirus has been in effect throughout Germany since the end of January. It requires companies to offer their employees the opportunity to work from home, as far as their work permits. As the results of the 28th edition of the BfR-Corona-Monitor, a regular survey by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), show, the regulation meets with the approval of the majority of the population. (2021-02-09)

Nitrate in maternal drinking water may impair fetal growth
Women whose household drinking water contained nitrate had babies that weighed, on average, 10 grams less than babies born to mothers where household water had no detectible nitrate, according to a new study. Even low nitrate levels -- about half of the allowable level set by the US Environmental Protection Agency, or EPA -- caused an adverse effect. (2021-02-09)

Popular tool for measuring child feeding practices validated by RIT researcher
A Rochester Institute of Technology researcher has validated a tool measuring adherence to a popular child feeding approach used by pediatricians, nutritionists, social workers and child psychologists to assess parents' feeding practices and prevent feeding problems. The best-practice approach, known as the Satter Division of Responsibility in Feeding, has now been rigorously tested and peer reviewed, resulting in the quantifiable tool sDOR.2-6y. (2021-02-08)

CU offers plan for improving mental health care for resident physicians
A pilot program to offer mental health services offered resident physicians at the University of Colorado School of Medicine provides a model for confidential and affordable help, according to an article published today by the journal Academic Medicine. (2021-02-04)

In survey of those with uncontrolled asthma, half smoked cannabis
A new survey in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology shows that of those who used cannabis, about half smoked it while a third vaped - both 'inhalation routes' likely to affect one's lungs. (2021-02-02)

The secrets of 3000 galaxies laid bare
The complex mechanics determining how galaxies spin, grow, cluster and die have been revealed following the release of all the data gathered during a massive seven-year Australian-led astronomy research project. (2021-02-02)

Tsunamis and tsunami warning: recent progress and future prospects
There have been frequent tsunamis since the 21st century, drawing the attention of many countries on the study of tsunami mechanism and warning. Tsunami records also play an essential role in deriving earthquake rupture models in subduction zones. A recent paper reviews the recent progress and limitations of tsunami research, from the aspects of tsunami generation, propagation, inversion and warning. Potential tsunami warning strategies are discussed and future prospects on tsunami research are provided. (2021-02-01)

Alpine plants at risk of extinction following disappearing glaciers
Nearly a quarter of Italian alpine plant species are threatened by glacier retreat, according to a new study from Stanford University. Glaciers around the world are predicted to disappear within the next decade and the consequences for the plants, animals and societies surrounding them are still uncertain. By combining historical records, current surveys and computational models, the researchers' findings may help guide conservation efforts. (2021-01-29)

Americans like sports, but heterosexual men especially do
Nearly nine out of 10 Americans say they enjoy sports at least a little, but heterosexual men more commonly identify as passionate sports fans, a new study suggests. A survey of nearly 4,000 American adults found that only 11% said they did not identify as sports fans at all. Over 40% were passionate fans, identifying themselves as being ''quite a bit'' or ''very much so'' sports fans. (2021-01-29)

OSU smoke- and tobacco-free policies grew more popular over time, even among tobacco users
Support for policies prohibiting smoking and the use of tobacco products on Oregon State University's Corvallis campus grew substantially over a five-year span, especially among tobacco users, a recent OSU study found. (2021-01-28)

World's largest opinion survey on climate change: Majority call for wide-ranging action
An innovative UNDP global survey conducted in collaboration with Oxford University experts -- the largest-ever opinion survey on climate change (1.2 million people in 50 countries) -- finds 64% (+/- 2%) deem climate an 'emergency.' Worldwide, most people clearly want a strong and wide-ranging policy response, and 4 of 18 policy options received majority support. Distributed across mobile gaming networks the survey drew 550,000 hard-to-reach youth respondents (14-18 years old) (2021-01-27)

Corona vaccination: Approach receives approval
Anyone who belongs to a risk group, lives in a nursing home or works in healthcare is first entitled to a vaccination against the novel coronavirus. The order for vaccination protection is regulated by the national vaccination strategy. As the results of the 27th edition of the BfR-Corona-Monitor, a regular survey conducted by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), show, the majority of the population approves of this approach. (2021-01-26)

Simulating 800,000 years of California earthquake history to pinpoint risks
A new study presents a prototype Rate-State earthquake simulator that simulates hundreds of thousands of years of seismic history in California. Coupled with another code, the framework can calculate the amount of shaking that would occur for each quake. The new approach improves the ability to pinpoint how big an earthquake might occur in a given location, allowing building code developers and structural engineers to design more resilient buildings that can survive earthquakes. (2021-01-25)

Most patients find teledermatology appointments suitable alternative to office visits
Researchers at the George Washington University (GW) surveyed dermatology patients at the GW Medical Faculty Associates to evaluate patient satisfaction with teledermatology appointments. The team found the majority of patients found the experience a suitable alternative to in-person office visits. (2021-01-25)

When it comes to eyewitness accounts of earthquake shaking, representation matters
As scientists increasingly rely on eyewitness accounts of earthquake shaking reported through online systems, they should consider whether those accounts are societally and spatially representative for an event, according to a new paper published in Seismological Research Letters. (2021-01-21)

Survey: Frequent reports of missed medical care in US adults during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic
Two out of five individuals delayed or missed medical care in the early phase of the pandemic--from March through mid-July 2020. (2021-01-21)

Study shows number and variety of issues experienced by staff wearing
A new study analysing the impact of PPE staff shows that the number and variety of issues they experience increases as their time in PPE without a break increases, ranging from tiredness and headaches in the first hour to nausea, vomiting and dizziness as they head towards four hours continuously in PPE. (2021-01-21)

This Great Lakes fish may have evolved to see like its ocean ancestors did
In the dark waters of Lake Superior, a fish species adapted to regain a genetic trait that may have helped its ancient ancestors see in the ocean, a study finds. ''Evolution is often thought of as a one-way process, at least over deep time, but in this example, over 175 million years, we have this reversal back to a much earlier ancestral state,'' one of the researchers says. (2021-01-20)

Psychological well-being declined during second wave of the pandemic - especially for men
Our psychological well-being follows the rise and fall of the infection rate, but whereas psychological well-being fell most for women during the spring lockdown, it is men who are hardest hit during the second wave. This is shown by a new study from Aarhus University, Denmark. (2021-01-19)

Study finds NRA stakeholders conflicted in wake of shootings
A recent study finds that, in the wake of a mass shooting, National Rifle Association (NRA) employees, donors and volunteers had extremely mixed emotions about the organization - reporting higher levels of both positive and negative feelings about the NRA, as compared to people with no NRA affiliation. (2021-01-12)

New analysis highlights importance of groundwater discharge into oceans
An invisible flow of groundwater seeps into the ocean along coastlines all over the world. Scientists have tended to disregard its contributions to ocean chemistry, focusing on the far greater volumes of water and dissolved material entering the sea from rivers and streams, but a new study finds groundwater discharge plays a more significant role than had been thought. (2021-01-08)

Insights into the Yellowstone hotspot
The Yellowstone hotspot is well known for generating supereruptions in the geologic past that are far more explosive than historic examples. The origin and sustained longevity of the hotspot is less understood but is focused on two competing models, where the ascent of hot mantle is derived from either a deep-seated mantle plume or a shallow mantle source. (2021-01-07)

Study: Black Americans, women, conservatives more hesitant to trust COVID-19 vaccine
A survey of approximately 5,000 Americans suggests that 31.1 percent of the US public does not intend to get the COVID-19 vaccine once it becomes available to them - and the likelihood of vaccine refusal is highest among Black Americans, women and conservatives. (2021-01-06)

Israel can expect a major earthquake of 6.5 on the Richter scale in the coming years
The researchers warn: In the coming years, it is likely that a devastating earthquake will hit, causing hundreds of deaths. (2021-01-06)

In changing oceans, sea stars may be 'drowning'
New Cornell University-led research suggests that starfish, victims of sea star wasting disease (SSWD), may actually be in respiratory distress - literally 'drowning' in their own environment - as elevated microbial activity derived from nearby organic matter and warm ocean temperatures rob the creatures of their ability to breathe. (2021-01-06)

Modern microbes provide window into ancient ocean
Roughly two billion years ago, microorganisms called cyanobacteria fundamentally transformed the globe. Researchers are now stepping back to that pivotal moment in Earth's history. (2021-01-06)

Frequent travel could make you 7% happier
People dreaming of travel post-COVID-19 now have some scientific data to support their wanderlust. A new study in the journal of Tourism Analysis shows frequent travelers are happier with their lives than people who don't travel at all. (2021-01-04)

Psychological distress during first months of pandemic equal to that during prior year
The first longitudinal study of psychological distress during the coronavirus pandemic shows that more than 10% of Americans reported experiencing symptoms of significant psychological distress during April and May of 2020 -- the same amount that reported experiencing distress during the prior year. Distress was most common among people who reported distress during the prior year. (2021-01-04)

Identifying where to reforest after wildfire
Forest managers can now look to a newly enhanced, predictive mapping tool to learn where forests are likely to regenerate on their own and where replanting efforts may be beneficial. This study also indicates a not-so-evergreen future of fewer conifers. (2020-12-18)

New path to rare earth mineral formation has implications for green energy and smart tech
Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have shed new light on the formation mechanisms of a rare earth-bearing mineral that is in increasingly high demand across the globe for its use in the green energy and tech industries. Their discovery has important economic implications because there are no substitute alternatives to these rare earth elements, which are indispensable for smart devices and low-carbon energy generation (e.g., electronics, wind turbines, hybrid cars). (2020-12-17)

How scientists are using declassified military photographs to analyse historical ecological change
Researchers are using?Cold?War spy satellite images to explore changes in the environment, including deforestation in Romania, marmot decline in Kazakhstan and ecological damage from bombs in Vietnam.? (2020-12-17)

Seismic Hazard Assessment: Campotosto, Italy
Between 1997 and 2017, central Italy was struck by several seismic sequences that cumulatively claimed more than 600 victims, besides producing widespread destruction in historical towns and damage to vital infrastructures. Based on the integration of geological and seismological datasets, this new study published in the Geological Society of America Bulletin provides a 4D, high-resolution image of a crustal volume hosting an active linkage zone between two major seismogenic faults. (2020-12-16)

Survey shows dicamba may reduce the effectiveness of junglerice controls
A recent survey featured in the journal Weed Technology explores the prevalence of junglerice in cotton and soybean crops and whether dicamba interferes with the effectiveness of herbicides used to control the weed. (2020-12-15)

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