Current Geometry News and Events

Current Geometry News and Events, Geometry News Articles.
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Quantum magic squares
The magic of mathematics is particularly reflected in magic squares. Recently, quantum physicist Gemma De las Cuevas and mathematicians Tim Netzer and Tom Drescher introduced the notion of the quantum magic square, and for the first time studied in detail the properties of this quantum version of magic squares. (2020-11-24)

Six years in 120 pages: Researchers shed light on Ricci flows
Researchers from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) proved two core conjectures in geometric analysis: Hamilton-Tian conjecture and the Partial C0-conjecture. It is a major breakthrough in geometric analysis, and it no doubt will lead many other related research projects. (2020-11-23)

A new beat in quantum matter
Oscillatory behaviors are ubiquitous in Nature, ranging from the orbits of planets to the periodic motion of a swing. In pure crystalline systems, presenting a perfect spatially-periodic structure, the fundamental laws of quantum physics predict a remarkable and counter-intuitive oscillatory behavior: when subjected to a weak electric force, the electrons in the material do not undergo a net drift, but rather oscillate in space, a phenomenon known as Bloch oscillations. (2020-11-23)

Minuscule migrations
Cells move constantly throughout our bodies, performing myriad operations critical to tissue development, immune responses and general wellbeing. This bustle is guided by chemical cues long studied by scientists interested in cellular migration. (2020-11-20)

Small finlets on owl feathers point the way to less aircraft noise
Collaboration between City, University of London and RWTH Aachen University researchers reveals how these micro-structures enable silent flight. (2020-11-18)

No losses: Scientists stuff graphene with light
Physicists from MIPT and Vladimir State University, Russia, have achieved a nearly 90% efficiency converting light energy into surface waves on graphene. They relied on a laser-like energy conversion scheme and collective resonances. (2020-11-16)

UCLA researchers create armored emulsions as tiny test tubes for parallel reactions
UCLA bioengineers and mathematicians have invented the first-ever 'armored' emulsions. The armor comes in the form of tiny soft U-shaped cups, about a half-millimeter in length. With a hydrophobic (water-repelling) exterior and hydrophilic (water-attracting) interior, each U-shaped particle captures a fluid droplet resulting in an emulsion that stays intact following mixing. The research was published in Science Advances. (2020-11-12)

FAST helps reveal the origin of fast radio bursts
Researchers from Beijing Normal University, Peking University and National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) found that there is weak correlation between fast radio bursts(FRBs) and soft gamma-ray repeater J1935+2145(SGRs). (2020-11-04)

Do the twist: Making two-dimensional quantum materials using curved surfaces
Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have discovered a way to control the growth of twisting, microscopic spirals of materials just one atom thick. The continuously twisting stacks of two-dimensional materials built by a team led by UW-Madison chemistry Professor Song Jin create new properties that scientists can exploit to study quantum physics on the nanoscale. (2020-10-22)

The Milky Way galaxy has a clumpy halo
Astronomers at the University of Iowa have determined our galaxy is surrounded by a clumpy halo of hot gases that is continually being supplied with material ejected by birthing or dying stars. The halo also may be where matter unaccounted for since the birth of the universe may reside. Results published in the journal Nature Astronomy. (2020-10-19)

A RUDN University physicist simplified the Einstein-lovelock theory for black holes
Allowing for quantum corrections, the Einstein-Lovelock theory describes black holes with an equation that contains an infinite number of terms. However, according to a RUDN University physicist, the geometry of a black hole in this theory can be presented in a compact form, and a limited number of terms can suffice to describe the observed values. This could help scientists study black holes in theories with quantum corrections to Einstein's equations. (2020-10-03)

AI learns to trace neuronal pathways
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory scientists dramatically improved the efficiency of automated methods for tracing neuronal connections. They taught a computer to recognize different parts of neurons, then used the math of topology to see how those neurons are likely to connect. (2020-09-28)

Antiferromagnet lattice arrangements influence phase transitions
New research published in EPJ B reveals that the nature of the boundary at which an antiferromagnet transitions to a state of disorder slightly depends on the geometry of its lattice arrangement. (2020-09-28)

A Sudoku-solving algorithm holds promise for protein medicine
Computational biologists from the University of Toronto have developed an artificial intelligence algorithm that has the potential to design novel protein molecules as finely tuned therapeutics. (2020-09-23)

Marine sponges inspire the next generation of skyscrapers and bridges
Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) are using the glassy skeletons of marine sponges as inspiration for the next generation of stronger and taller buildings, longer bridges, and lighter spacecraft. The researchers showed that the diagonally-reinforced square lattice-like skeletal structure of Euplectella aspergillum, a deep-water marine sponge, has a higher strength-to-weight ratio than the traditional lattice designs that have used for centuries in the construction of buildings and bridges. (2020-09-21)

Next-gen organoids grow and function like real tissues
Bioengineers at EPFL have created miniature intestines in a dish that match up anatomically and functionally to the real thing better than any other lab-grown tissue models. The biological complexity and longevity of the new organoid technology is an important step towards enabling drug testing, personalized medicine, and perhaps, one day, transplantations. (2020-09-16)

Virtual tourism could offer new opportunities for travel industry, travelers
A new proposal for virtual travel, using advanced mathematical techniques and combining livestream video with existing photos and videos of travel hotspots, could help revitalize an industry that has been devastated by the coronavirus pandemic, according to researchers at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University. (2020-09-09)

Physicists achieve tunable spin wave excitation
Physicists have demonstrated new methods for controlling spin waves in nanostructured bismuth iron garnet films via short laser pulses. The solution has potential for applications in energy-efficient information transfer and spin-based quantum computing. (2020-09-08)

The mathematical magic of bending grids
A mathematical discovery opens up new possibilities for architecture and design: For any desired curved surface a flat grid of straight bars can be calculated that can be folded out to the desired curved structure. The result is a stable form that can even carry loads. (2020-08-24)

Novel 3D-printed device demonstrates enhanced capture of carbon dioxide emissions
The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers have designed and additively manufactured a first-of-its-kind aluminum device that enhances the capture of carbon dioxide emitted from fossil fuel plants and other industrial processes. (2020-08-24)

Inside the ice giants of space
A new theoretical method paves the way to modelling the interior of the ice giants Uranus and Neptune, thanks to computer simulations on the water contained within them. The tool, developed by scientists from SISSA in Trieste and the University of California at Los Angeles, allows one to analyse thermal and electric processes occurring at physical conditions that are often impossible to reproduce experimentally, with a much easier and low-cost approach. (2020-08-10)

Grasshopper jumping on Bloch sphere finds new quantum insights
New research at the University of Warwick has (pardon the pun) put a new spin on a mathematical analogy involving a jumping grasshopper and its ideal lawn shape. This work could help us understand the spin states of quantum-entangled particles. (2020-08-10)

Molecular forces: The surprising stretching behavior of DNA
Experiments with DNA molecules show that their mechanical properties are completely different from what those of macroscopic objects - and this has important consequences for biology and medicine. Scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) has now succeeded in explaining these properties in detail by combining ideas from civil engineering and physics. (2020-08-05)

Manifestation of quantum distance in flat band materials
IBS research team found a way to measure the quantum distance of Bloch states in solids by applying magnetic field. (2020-08-05)

"Inchworm" pattern of Indonesian earthquake rupture powered seismic "boom"
A sonic boom-like seismic phenomenon of supershear rupture occurred during the 2018 Palu earthquake in Indonesia. University of Tsukuba researchers investigated the relationship between this phenomenon and the complex geometry of the Palu-Koro fault. An ''inchworm-like'' pattern of repeated rupture deceleration and acceleration along the fault was detected, associated with bends in the fault trace. This slip evolution may have enhanced the propagation of supershear rupture and contributed to the generation of the 2018 Palu tsunami. (2020-07-27)

The immune system facilitates alcohol addiction
The activation of the immune system could eventually perpetuate some of the deleterious effects of alcohol, like addiction. It is the conclusion of a research carried out by an international team led by Dr. Santiago Canals, from the Institute of Neurosciences in Alicante (Spain), a joint center of the Spanish National Research Council and the University Miguel Hernández in Elche, and Dr. Wolfgang Sommer, from the Central Institute of Mental Health of the University of Heidelberg (Germany). (2020-07-21)

Plato was right. Earth is made, on average, of cubes
The ancient philosopher Plato posited the shapes of the building blocks of the universe. According to him, the earth was formed of cubes. In new research, Douglas Jerolmack of the University of Pennsylvania and Gabor Domokos of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics and colleagues find a fundamental truth in that premise. Studying the shapes and fragmentation patterns of a variety of rocks, they found that the average of all their forms is a cube. (2020-07-20)

High-order synthetic dimensions in waveguide photonic lattices
In the recent work, scientists from Max-Born-Institute have shown that a multitude of high-dimensional synthetic lattices naturally emerge in (abstract) photon-number space when a multiport photonic lattice is excited by N indistinguishable photons. (2020-07-06)

Order from noise: How randomness and collective dynamics define a stem cell
Without stem cells, human life would not exist. Due to them, a lump of cells becomes an organ, and a fertilized egg develops into a baby. But what actually makes a stem cell? Are these a stable population of specially gifted cells? Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria discovered that instead, stem cells might emerge due to the collective behavior of cells within the organs. (2020-07-06)

Quantum physics: Realization of an anomalous Floquet topological system
An international team led by physicists from the Ludwig-Maximilians Universitaet (LMU) in Munich realized a novel genuine time-dependent topological system with ultracold atoms in periodically-driven optical honeycomb lattices. (2020-07-03)

The Kerguelen oceanic plateau sheds light on the formation of continents
How did the continents form? Although to a certain extent this remains an open question, the oceanic plateau of the Kerguelen Islands may well provide part of the answer, according to a French-Australian team led by the Géosciences Environnement Toulouse laboratory (CNRS/Université Toulouse III-Paul Sabatier/IRD/CNES). (2020-06-19)

22,000 tiny tremblors illustrate 3D fault geometry and earthquake swarm evolution
By mapping the more than 22,000 tremblors, researchers composed a detailed, three-dimensional image of the complex fault structure below southern California's Cahuilla Valley. (2020-06-18)

Order from disorder
An international team of researchers have harnessed turbulence in light to create a specific type of high-precision laser, known as a laser frequency comb, in a system previously thought incapable of producing such a laser. The discovery could be used in a new generation of devices for applications such as optical spectroscopy and sensing. (2020-06-17)

Crop pathogens 'remarkably adaptable'
Pathogens that attack agricultural crops show remarkable adaptability to new climates and new plant hosts, new research shows. (2020-06-11)

New distance measurements bolster challenge to basic model of universe
A cosmic measurement technique independent of all others adds strong evidence pointing to a problem with the current theoretical model describing the composition and evolution of the Universe. (2020-06-11)

An unusual cobalt compound
A research team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) and Carleton University in Ottawa has manufactured a novel, highly versatile cobalt compound. The molecules of the compound are stable, extremely compact and have a low molecular weight so that they can be evaporated for the production of thin films. Accordingly, they are of interest for applications such as battery or accumulator production. Because of their special geometry, the compound also has a very unusual spin configuration of ½. (2020-06-09)

Cosmic quasars embrace 1970s fashion trend
Researchers have studied more than 300 quasars -- spinning black holes that produce beams of plasma. The team has found that the shape of these so-called astrophysical jets changes from parabolic to conical at some distance from the black hole, reminiscent of the iconic flared jeans of the '70s. By effectively measuring these 'cosmic pants,' the researchers aim to interpret the workings of the central engine that accelerates matter to nearly the speed of light at the centers of remote active galaxies. (2020-06-08)

Australia's ancient geology controls the pathways of modern earthquakes
New research near Uluru in Australia's arid centre shows that rock structures formed deep within the ancient Gondwana supercontinent controlled the rupture pathways of one of Australia's largest modern earthquakes. (2020-06-04)

Scientist captures new images of Martian moon Phobos to help determine its origins
Christopher Edwards, assistant professor in Northern Arizona University's Department of Astronomy and Planetary Science, just processed new images of the Martian moon Phobos that give scientists insight into the physical properties of the moon and its composition. (2020-06-02)

NUI Galway mathematician publishes article in world's top mathematics journal
An Irish mathematician, Dr Martin Kerin, from the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Applied Mathematics at NUI Galway, has had a research article published in the Annals of Mathematics, widely regarded as the top journal for pure mathematics in the world. The article resolves a question ?rst asked around 60 years ago on the geometrical properties of seven-dimensional objects which very closely resemble spheres. (2020-05-28)

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