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Current Geophysics News and Events

Current Geophysics News and Events, Geophysics News Articles.
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Researchers produce new map of seismic hazards
Builders of hydroelectric dams are required to perform seismic hazard studies before their designs are approved. (2017-08-21)
This week from AGU: New study details ocean's role in fourth-largest extinction
Extremely low oxygen levels in Earth's oceans could be responsible for extending the effects of a mass extinction that wiped out millions of species on Earth around 200 million years ago, according to a new study published in Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems. (2017-08-16)
Stanford researchers find similar characteristics in human-induced and natural earthquakes
New research shows manmade and naturally occurring earthquakes in the central US share the same characteristics, information that will help scientists predict and mitigate damage from future earthquakes. (2017-08-02)
This week from AGU: Water quality improvements increase bay home prices
This week from AGU includes research highlighted on AGU's blog and from Eos.org. (2017-07-19)
New research uses satellites to predict end of volcanic eruptions
Researchers from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa recently discovered that infrared satellite data could be used to predict when lava flow-forming eruptions will end. (2017-07-13)
OU team details foreshock activities leading up to Pawnee earthquake
A University of Oklahoma geophysics professor, Xiaowei Chen, details the foreshock activities leading up to the Pawnee earthquake, and highlights the complicated relationship between seismicity and wastewater injection rates in a research study published this week in Scientific Reports. (2017-07-12)
Researchers document early, permananet human settlement in Andes
Examining human remains and other archaeological evidence from a site at nearly 12,500 feet above sea level in Peru, the scientists show that intrepid hunter-gatherers -- men, women and children -- managed to survive at high elevation before the advent of agriculture, in spite of lack of oxygen, frigid temperatures and exposure to elements. (2017-06-28)
Hydraulic fracturing rarely linked to felt seismic tremors
New research suggests hydraulic fracturing and saltwater disposal has limited impact on seismic events. (2017-06-26)
Annotated photos highlight long-term international collaboration in atmospheric sciences
International cooperation is an essential prerequisite for long-term success in atmospheric sciences, an enterprise of global scale by its very nature. (2017-04-12)
As sea level rises, much of Honolulu and Waikiki vulnerable to groundwater inundation
New research from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa reveals a large part of the heavily urbanized area of Honolulu and Waikiki, Hawai'i is at risk of groundwater inundation--flooding that occurs as groundwater is lifted above the ground surface due to sea level rise. (2017-03-28)
Researchers discover dust plays prominent role in nutrients of mountain forest ecoystems
This study shows that dust may be crucial in mountainous forest ecosystems, dominating nutrient budgets despite continuous replacement of depleted soils with fresh bedrock via erosion. (2017-03-28)
Liverpool scientists awarded £1 million Leverhulme grant to explore Earth's deep interior
Scientists from the University of Liverpool are seeking to answer unsolved questions about Earth's core and mantle with a major research project supported by the Leverhulme Trust. (2017-03-21)
Looking for 'fingerprints' at the intersection of weather and climate
Scientists have found the seasonal 'fingerprints' of Arctic sea ice, El Nino, and other climate phenomena in a new study that probes the global interactions between weather and climate. (2017-03-13)
Colorado Governor is keynote speaker at SSA Annual Meeting
Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper will be the keynote speaker at the 2017 SSA Annual Meeting's Public Policy Luncheon, scheduled for 12 noon CT on 19 April, at the Sheraton Downtown Denver. (2017-03-02)
Ozone watch
The symposium covers all issues related to atmospheric ozone, including trends of ozone in the stratosphere and troposphere, ozone-climate interactions, latest emerging techniques for ozone observations, and effects of ozone on human health, ecosystems and food production. (2017-02-01)
This Week from AGU: Coal mine dust lowers spectral reflectance of Arctic snow
This Week from AGU: Coal mine dust lowers spectral reflectance of Arctic snow. (2017-02-01)
Watching water freeze (video)
Every winter, snow and ice dusts mountains and makes roads slick in cold climates. (2016-12-21)
Breakup of supercontinent Pangea cooled mantle and thinned crust
The oceanic crust produced by the Earth today is significantly thinner than crust made 170 million years ago during the time of the supercontinent Pangea, according to University of Texas at Austin researchers. (2016-12-13)
Mars ice deposit holds as much water as Lake Superior
Frozen beneath a region of cracked and pitted plains on Mars lies about as much water as what's in Lake Superior, largest of the Great Lakes, a team of scientists led by the University of Texas at Austin has determined using data from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. (2016-11-22)
New maps created by Stanford scientists reveal safe locations for wastewater injection
New maps of the geologic forces contributing to earthquakes in Texas and Oklahoma could help reduce the likelihood of manmade temblors associated with wastewater injection. (2016-11-11)
Unusual Martian region leaves clues to planet's past
Researchers studied an unusual region on Mars -- an area with high elevation called Thaumasia Planum. (2016-11-02)
A new Goldilocks for habitable planets
The search for habitable, alien worlds needs to make room for a second 'Goldilocks,' according to a Yale University researcher. (2016-08-19)
Safer air travel: Existing navigation data can help pilots avoid turbulence
Detecting turbulence remains the Achilles' heel of modern-day aviation. The reports submitted by pilots, subjective and often very inaccurate, are the least expensive and the most frequently used method for trying to predict where it will occur. (2016-08-11)
Magma-limestone interaction can trigger explosive volcanic eruptions -- and affect the global carbon cycle
In a new study researchers from Sweden and Italy show what happens when magma meets limestone on its way up to the surface. (2016-08-08)
Digging deeper into Mars
Scientists continue to unravel the mystery of life on Mars by investigating evidence of water in the planet's soil. (2016-07-25)
Stanford researchers calculate groundwater levels from satellite data
A new computer algorithm that can (2016-06-09)
Diego Melgar Moctezuma honored with Charles F. Richter Early Career Award
Early in his career, seismologist Diego Melgar Moctezuma has already made significant research contributions in the areas of earthquake rupture and early warning, tsunami modeling, and community outreach regarding earthquakes and geosciences. (2016-05-24)
Seismologist Michael E. Wysession honored for contributions to geosciences education
For his exceptional leadership in geosciences education and his devotion to public understanding of earthquakes and their impact on society, the Seismological Society of America will present Michael E. (2016-05-24)
BSSA Editor-in-Chief Diane Doser honored with SSA Distinguished Service Award
For her two decades of outstanding dedication and leadership of the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, the Seismological Society of America will present Diane I. (2016-05-24)
Evidence of repeated rapid retreat of the East Antarctic ice sheet
Research published in the journal Nature on May 19, 2016 has revealed that vast regions of the Totten Glacier in East Antarctica are fundamentally unstable and have contributed significantly to rising sea levels several times in the past. (2016-05-18)
World's shallowest slow-motion earthquakes detected offshore of New Zealand
Research published in the May 6 edition of Science indicates that slow-motion earthquakes or 'slow-slip events' can rupture the shallow portion of a fault that also moves in large, tsunami-generating earthquakes. (2016-05-05)
What lies beneath West Antarctica?
Three recent publications by early career researchers at three different institutions across the country provide the first look into the biogeochemistry, geophysics and geology of Subglacial Lake Whillans, which lies 800 meters (2,600 feet) beneath the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. (2016-04-29)
Europa's heaving ice might make more heat than scientists thought
A new set of experiments sheds light on how much heat is created when ice is deformed, which could help scientists understand the possibility of a subsurface ocean on one of Jupiter's moons. (2016-04-14)
Researchers define links within 2 supercontinents
A new paper argues that the rocks or crust now exposed in southern Siberia were once connected to northern North America for nearly a quarter of the Earth's history. (2016-04-11)
Gravity glasses offer a view of the Earth's interior
How does the ice on the polar caps change? And which are the geological characteristics of the Earth's crust beneath? (2016-03-14)
Faults control the amount of water into the Earth during continental breakup
New light has been shed on the processes by which ocean water enters the solid Earth during continental breakup. (2016-03-07)
New study pinpoints stress factor of mega-earthquake off Japan
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego researchers published new findings on the role geological rock formations offshore of Japan played in producing the massive 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake -- one of only two magnitude nine mega-earthquakes to occur in the last 50 years. (2016-03-02)
Ancient rocks of Tetons formed by continental collisions
Plate tectonics were operating in what is now western Wyoming long before the collisions that created the Himalayas starting 40 million years ago. (2016-01-29)
This week from AGU: Blogs from #AGU15, ocean sounds & winds, & 5 new research papers
A new analysis helps consumers choose which appliances to swap for more efficient models and save money in the process, with some surprising results. (2016-01-06)
When trees die, water slows
Mountain pine beetle populations have exploded over the past decade, and these insects have infected and killed thousands of acres of western pine forests. (2015-12-16)
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