Current Germanium News and Events

Current Germanium News and Events, Germanium News Articles.
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An optical coating like no other
The technology, based on Fano resonance, results in a coating that fully reflects only a very narrow wavelength. The technology could improve the effectiveness of devices that use hybrid thermal-electric power generation as a solar energy option. (2021-02-04)

Fine tuned: adjusting the composition and properties of semiconducting 2D alloys
Semiconducting 2D alloys could be key to overcoming the technical limitations of modern electronics. Although 2D Si-Ge alloys would have interesting properties for this purpose, they were only predicted theoretically. Now, scientists from Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have realized the first experimental demonstration. They have also shown that the Si to Ge ratio can be adjusted to fine tune the electronic properties of the alloys, paving the way for novel applications. (2021-02-02)

Electrically switchable qubit can tune between storage and fast calculation modes
To perform calculations, quantum computers need qubits to act as elementary building blocks that process and store information. Now, physicists have produced a new type of qubit that can be switched from a stable idle mode to a fast calculation mode. The concept would also allow a large number of qubits to be combined into a powerful quantum computer, as researchers from the University of Basel and TU Eindhoven have reported in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. (2021-01-11)

Electrons falling flat: Germanium falls into a 2D arrangement on zirconium diboride
Scientists have recently revealed, both theoretically and experimentally, that germanium atoms can arrange themselves into a 2D 'bitriangular' lattice on zirconium diboride thin films grown on germanium single crystals to form a 'flat band material' with an embedded 'kagome' lattice. The result provides experimental support to a theoretical prediction of flat bands emerging from trivial atomic geometry and indicates the possibility of their existence in many more materials. (2020-12-04)

Strain engineering of 2D semiconductor and graphene
Strain engineering can significantly manipulate the two-dimensional (2D) materials' electronic and optical properties, which endow it the potential applications in optoelectronics and nanophotonics. To summarize recent fascinating work about the strain engineering of 2D materials, scientists in China write a review article that gives people a comprehensive introduction to this field, including the strain field theory, tunable band structure and optical properties of 2D materials under strain field, and their photonic applications. (2020-11-23)

Germanium telluride's hidden properties at the nanoscale revealed
Germanium Telluride is an interesting candidate material for spintronic devices. In a comprehensive study at BESSY II, a Helmholtz-RSF Joint Research Group has now revealed how the spin texture switches by ferroelectric polarization within individual nanodomains. (2020-11-06)

Scientists identify solid electrolyte materials that boost lithium-ion battery performance
The discovery could help battery researchers design the first solid electrolytes that are safe, cheap and efficient. (2020-09-21)

Materials science researchers develop first electrically injected laser
Materials science researchers have demonstrated the first electrically injected laser made with germanium tin. Used as a semiconducting material for circuits on electronic devices, the diode laser could improve micro-processing speed and efficiency at much lower costs. (2020-08-07)

FSU News: MagLab geochemists solve mystery of Earth's vanishing crust
A team of geochemists based at the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory has found new evidence that Earth has been consistently churning out crust since its formation 4.5 billion years ago and that some crust is made of ancient, resurfaced chunks. (2020-06-26)

Configurable circuit technology poised to expand silicon photonic applications
Researchers have developed a new way to build power efficient and programmable integrated switching units on a silicon photonics chip. The new technology is poised to reduce production costs by allowing a generic optical circuit to be fabricated in bulk and then later programmed for specific applications such as communications systems, LIDAR circuits or computing applications. (2020-05-28)

Researchers develop material capable of being invisible or reflective
Scientists have proposed a new metamaterial capable of changing its optical properties without any mechanical input. This development could result in a significant improvement in the reliability of complex optical devices while making them cheaper to manufacture. (2020-05-20)

Designing flexible and stretchable single crystal electronic systems
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in collaboration with a Purdue team have discovered that certain crystals are more flexible and stretchable compared to current materials used for electronic applications. These new materials could therefore be used for making sensors and in robotics. (2020-05-13)

Eindhoven researchers present revolutionary light-emitting silicon
Emitting light from silicon has been the 'Holy Grail' in the microelectronics industry for decades. Solving this puzzle would revolutionize computing, as chips will become faster than ever. Researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology now succeeded: they have developed an alloy with silicon that can emit light. The results have been published in the journal Nature. The team will now start creating a silicon laser to be integrated into current chips. (2020-04-08)

Neutron research: Magnetic monopoles detected in Kagome spin ice systems
Magnetic monopoles are actually impossible. At low temperatures, however, certain crystals can contain so-called quasi-particles that behave like magnetic monopoles. Now an international cooperation has proven that such monopoles also occur in a Kagome spin ice system. Decisive factors were, among others, measurements with inelastic neutron scattering at the NEAT instrument of the Berlin neutron source BER II*. The results have been published in the journal Science. (2020-04-07)

Researchers help expand search for new state of matter
Scientists have been striving to establish the existence of quantum spin liquids, a new state of matter, since the 1970s. A recent discovery by University of Arkansas physicists could help researchers solve the mystery and result in the next generation of computing. (2020-04-06)

Research institutes careers media about us high-efficiency laser for silicon chips
Transistors work electrically, but data can be transmitted more quickly by using light. Scientists from Forschungszentrum J├╝lich have now come a step closer to integrating lasers directly in silicon chips. Together with researchers from Centre de Nanosciences et de Nanotechnologies in Paris and the French company STMicroelectronics as well as CEA-LETI Grenoble, they have developed a compatible semiconductor laser made of germanium and tin, whose efficiency is comparable with conventional GaAs semiconductor lasers on Si. (2020-03-24)

Peppered with gold
Terahertz waves are becoming more important in science and technology. But generating these waves is still a challenge. A team at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), TU Dresden and University of Konstanz has now developed a germanium component that generates short terahertz pulses with an advantageous property: the pulses have an extreme broadband spectrum and thus deliver many different terahertz frequencies at the same time. The development promises a broad range of applications in research and technology. (2020-03-16)

Anomalies in structure of polyvalent metal melts explained
Metals and their alloys are the main structural materials of modern civilization. The properties of metal melts are well studied. However, according to Anatoly Mokshin, one of the co-authors of the publication, Chair of the Department of Computational Physics at Kazan Federal University, for more than 25 years, scientists from all over the world have been trying to explain experimentally observed structural features of the melts of such metals as gallium, germanium and bismuth. These features are called ''structural anomalies.'' (2020-02-28)

A new look at 'strange metals'
'Strange metals' could be the key to finally understanding high-temperature superconductors. After years of research, scientists have now found a way to analyze these materials, answering important questions in materials science. (2020-01-16)

Bending an organic semiconductor can boost electrical flow
Slightly bending semiconductors made of organic materials can roughly double the speed of electricity flowing through them and could benefit next-generation electronics such as sensors and solar cells, according to Rutgers-led research. The study is published in the journal Advanced Science. (2019-12-03)

Liquid-liquid transitions crystallize new ideas for molecular liquids
Researchers from The University of Tokyo, Institute of Industrial Science, and Tokyo Metropolitan University experimentally demonstrated that liquid-liquid transitions of a molecular liquid were coupled to crystallization behavior. The team was able to enhance the crystallization of triphenyl phosphite by applying heat treatments at temperatures relevant to the liquid phase transitions. The findings could lead to better control of crystallization in applications in science and technology, for example, in protein chemistry and nanomaterials. (2019-11-25)

T-shirt generates electricity from temperature difference between body and surroundings
Researchers of the Faculty of Science of the University of Malaga (UMA) have designed a low-cost T-shirt that generates electricity from the temperature difference between the human body and the surroundings. We are talking about the 'e-textile' prototype, developed in collaboration with the Italian Institute of Technology in Genoa (IIT) based on sustainable methods and low-cost materials like tomato skin. (2019-11-22)

Light-based 'tractor beam' assembles materials at the nanoscale
Researchers have adapted a light-based technology employed widely in biology -- known as optical traps or optical tweezers -- to operate in a water-free liquid environment of carbon-rich organic solvents. The optical tweezers act as a light-based 'tractor beam' that can assemble nanoscale semiconductor materials precisely into larger structures. Unlike the tractor beams of science fiction, which might grab massive spaceships, these optical tweezers can trap materials that are nearly one billion times shorter than a meter. (2019-11-04)

Using computational chemistry to produce cheaper infrared plastic lenses
A University of Arizona team created the next generation of long-wave infrared plastic lenses. The plastic, a sulfur-based polymer forged from waste generated by refining fossil fuels, is incredibly useful for lenses, window and other devices requiring transmission of infrared light, or IR, which makes heat visible. The new lens material could make IR cameras and sensor devices more accessible to consumers. (2019-10-29)

Newly created magnets are cheaper, more effective and 'smarter'
Ferromagnets, or more precisely, magnets -- are extremely demanded materials in modern electronics. The magnets present in almost every device -- TVs, computers, fridges, cars, smartphones, etc. But it is necessary to remember, that ferromagnetic alloys are made of rare-earth elements (REE) that is way an effective and high-powered magnet is an expensive thing. (2019-10-28)

Closing in on elusive particles
In the quest to prove that matter can be produced without antimatter, the GERDA experiment at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory in Italy is looking for signs of neutrinoless double beta decay. The experiment has the greatest sensitivity worldwide for detecting the decay in question. To further improve the chances of success, a follow-up project, LEGEND, uses an even more refined decay experiment. (2019-09-05)

Could the heat of the Earth's crust become the ultimate energy source?
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology and Sanoh Industrial developed a very stable battery cell that can directly convert heat into electricity, thus finally providing a way for exploiting geothermal energy in a sustainable way. (2019-07-17)

Giving nanowires a DNA-like twist
Argonne National Laboratory played a critical role in the discovery of a DNA-like twisted crystal structure created with a germanium sulfide nanowire, also known as a 'van der Waals material.' Researchers can tailor these nanowires in many different ways -- twist periods from two to twenty micrometers, lengths up to hundreds of micrometers, and radial dimensions from several hundred nanometers to about ten micrometers. By this means, they can adjust the electrical and optical properties to optimize performance for different applications. (2019-07-10)

Crystal with a twist: Scientists grow spiraling new material
Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have created new inorganic crystals made of stacks of atomically thin sheets that unexpectedly spiral like a nanoscale card deck. Their surprising structures, reported in a new study in the journal Nature, may yield unique optical, electronic and thermal properties, including superconductivity, the researchers say. (2019-06-20)

Why you should care about better fiber optics
With a new method, the gallium antimonide is initially distributed throughout the silicon. This is a simpler and cheaper method than others to grow crystals, and the technology offers many possible applications. (2019-05-23)

Photonics: The curious case of the disappearing cylinders
A pair of researchers at Tokyo Tech describes a way of making a submicron-sized cylinder disappear without using any specialized coating. Their findings could enable invisibility of natural materials at optical frequency and eventually lead to a simpler way of enhancing optoelectronic devices, including sensing and communication technologies. (2019-04-22)

Semiconductor scientists discover effect that was thought impossible
Superinjection, the effect used in lasers and LEDs creation can work in 'pure' semiconductors, which was previously considered impossible. This opens up new prospects for designing highly efficient blue, violet, ultraviolet, and white LEDs, as well as light sources for optical wireless communication (Li-Fi), new types of lasers, transmitters for the quantum internet, and optical devices for early disease diagnostics. (2019-04-22)

Scientists synthesize new nanowires to improve high-speed communication
Scientists from the Institute of Process Engineering, City University of Hong Kong and their collaborators synthesized highly crystalline ternary In0.28Ga0.72Sb nanowires to demonstrate high carrier mobility and fast IR response. The new nanowire could help to improve high-speed communication. (2019-04-10)

AD alloyed nanoantennas for temperature-feedback identification of viruses and explosives
Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) in collaboration with colleagues from Far Eastern Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences (FEB RAS), ITMO University and Swinburne University of Technology (Australia) developed a method for efficient mass production of silicon-germanium fully alloyed nanoantennas. On their basis, optical biosensory platforms and next-generation chemical sensors for fast and accurate tracing of viruses, pollutions, explosives, etc. at low concentrations are expected to appear. Related paper was published in Nanoscale. (2019-04-01)

First transport measurements reveal intriguing properties of germanene
Germanene is a 2D material that derives from germanium and is related to graphene. As it is not stable outside the vacuum chambers in which is it produced, no real measurements of its electronic properties have been made. Scientists at the University of Groningen have now managed to produce devices with stable germanene. The material is an insulator, and it becomes a semiconductor after moderate heating and a very good metallic conductor after stronger heating. (2019-02-07)

Taking magnetism for a spin: Exploring the mysteries of skyrmions
Scientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have discovered the relaxation dynamics of a zero-field state in skyrmions, a spinning magnetic phenomenon that has potential applications in data storage and spintronic devices. (2019-01-23)

Twisting light to enable high-capacity data transmission
For the first time, researchers have used tiny gears made of germanium to generate a vortex of twisted light that turns around its axis of travel much like a corkscrew. Because germanium is compatible with the silicon used to make computer chips, the new light source could be used to boost the amount of data that can be transmitted with chip-based optical computing and communication. (2018-12-21)

Researchers develop method to non-destructively measure the salt content of concrete structures
Researchers have used a method, using the RANS compact neutron source, to non-destructively measure the salt content of structures such as bridges, tunnels, and elevated roadways, which can suffer from degradation due to exposure to salt from seawater and other sources. (2018-12-20)

Researchers use a virus to speed up modern computers
Researchers have successfully developed a method that could lead to unprecedented advances in computer speed and efficiency. (2018-12-04)

A new light on significantly faster computer memory devices
A team of scientists from ASU's School of Molecular Sciences and Germany have published in Science Advances online today an explanation of how a particular phase-change memory (PCM) material can work one thousand times faster than current flash computer memory, while being significantly more durable with respect to the number of daily read-writes. (2018-11-30)

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