Current Gestational Age News and Events

Current Gestational Age News and Events, Gestational Age News Articles.
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New model helping identify pregnant women whose previous kidney injury puts them, babies at risk
Young pregnant women, who appear to have fully recovered from an acute injury that reduced their kidney function, have higher rates of significant problems like preeclampsia and low birthweight babies, problems which indicate their kidneys have not actually fully recovered. MCG scientists have developed a rodent model that is enabling studies to better understand, identify and ideally avoid this recently identified association. (2021-02-22)

Adult neurogenesis may hold clues for more effective treatment of alcoholism
Neuroplasticity, the remarkable ability of the brain to modify and reorganize itself, is affected by or in response to excessive alcohol, whether through individual consumption or exposure in the womb. It is now well accepted that the birth and integration of new neurons continue beyond development and into adulthood. New discoveries and insights on how alcohol impacts this and other plastic processes are discussed in ''Alcohol and Neural Plasticity,'' a special issue of Brain Plasticity. (2021-02-10)

Increased risk of dying from COVID for people with severe mental disorders
People with severe mental disorders have a significantly increased risk of dying from COVID-19. This has been shown in a new study from Umeå University and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. Among the elderly, the proportion of deaths due to COVID-19 was almost fourfold for those with severe mental disorders compared to non-mentally ill people in the same age. (2021-02-03)

Heightened immigration enforcement has troubling impact on US citizen children
Harsher immigration law enforcement by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement leads to decreased use of prenatal care for immigrant mothers and declines in birth weight, according to new Duke University research. In the study, published in PLoS ONE, researchers examine the effects of the federal 287(g) immigration program. (2021-02-03)

Diabetes during pregnancy may increase risk of heart disease
An analysis of more than 1,000 women found that a history of gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) doubled the risk of heart artery calcification - a marker of increased risk for heart disease - many years after pregnancy, at the average age of 48, even if blood sugar returned to healthy levels. (2021-02-01)

Light pollution linked to preterm births, reduced birth weights
Researchers discovered that light pollution is linked to preterm birth, a shortened gestational length, and reduced birth weight. babies born too early have higher rates of death and disability. In 2018, preterm birth and low birth weight accounted for roughly 17% of infant deaths (deaths before one year of age). Researchers hope this spawns policy discussion around minimizing light pollution. (2021-01-28)

Fetal and neonatal therapies improve prognosis of congenital cytomegalovirus infection
A cross-institutional research group has revealed for the first time in the world that infants with symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection who were treated with a combination of immunoglobulin fetal therapy and neonatal therapy with antiviral drugs were less likely to experience the severe aftereffects associated with the infection than those who only received the neonatal therapy. (2021-01-28)

Heart disease #1 cause of death rank likely to be impacted by COVID-19 for years to come
Heart disease remains the #1 cause of death worldwide in the latest annual Statistical Update from the American Heart Association Experts say the effects of COVID-19 are likely to influence cardiovascular health and mortality rates for many years, directly and as a result of increased lifestyle-related risks during and after the pandemic. (2021-01-27)

Light pollution linked to preterm birth increase
Scientists conducted the first study to examine the fetal health impact of light pollution based on a direct measure of skyglow, an important aspect of light pollution. Using an empirical regularity discovered in physics, called Walker's Law, a team from Lehigh University, Lafayette College and the University of Colorado Denver in the U.S., found evidence of reduced birth weight, shortened gestational length and preterm births. (2021-01-25)

Prenatal BPA exposure may contribute to the male bias of autism spectrum disorder
Autism has a higher prevalence in males than females. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a common chemical found in plastics, our food, and even the human placenta. Higher prenatal exposure to BPA is thought to increase the risk of autism. Researchers have, for the first time, identified autism candidate genes that may be responsible for the sex-specific effects of BPA. (2021-01-19)

Research finds increased first-trimester exercise may reduce gestational diabetes risk
Pregnant women who exercise more during the first trimester of pregnancy may have a lower risk of developing gestational diabetes, according to a new study led by Samantha Ehrlich, an assistant professor in the Department of Public Health at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. The analysis found that lower risk was associated with at least 38 minutes of moderate intensity exercise each day--more than current recommendations of at least 30 minutes a day five days a week. (2021-01-11)

Changes in abortion in Texas following executive order ban during pandemic
Changes were assessed in abortions performed and at what gestational age following a Texas order postponing nonmedically necessary surgeries due to the COVID-19 pandemic compared with abortions performed during the same months in 2019. (2021-01-04)

New research highlights the importance of the thymus in successful pregnancies
How the immune system adapts to pregnancies has puzzled scientists for decades. Now, findings from an international group of researchers, led by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, reveal important changes that occur in the thymus to prevent miscarriages and gestational diabetes. The results are published in the journal Nature. (2020-12-23)

New research highlights the importance of a forgotten organ in ensuring healthy pregnancies
An international research team led by UBC has uncovered for the first time the importance of a small gland tucked behind the sternum that works to prevent miscarriage and diabetes in pregnant women. (2020-12-23)

The thymus as key to healthy pregnancies
How the immune system adapts to pregnancy has puzzled researchers for decades. An international team of researchers, including scientists from IMBA (Institute of Molecular Biotechnology) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences has now discovered that important changes in the thymus occur in order to prevent miscarriages and gestational diabetes. The results are published in the journal Nature. (2020-12-23)

Artificial intelligence predicts gestational diabetes in Chinese women
Machine learning, a form of artificial intelligence, can predict which women are at high risk of developing gestational diabetes and lead to earlier intervention, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2020-12-22)

BAME babies at highest risk of Vitamin D deficiency
A third of all babies and half of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) babies are vitamin D deficient, a large study of 3000 newborn's in the West Midlands has shown. (2020-12-16)

Human egg cells are imperfect surprisingly often
More than 7% of human oocytes contain at least one exchangeless chromosome pair, demonstrating a remarkably high level of meiotic recombination failure, finds a study appearing December 10 in the American Journal of Human Genetics. The findings suggest that right from the get-go of human egg cell development, a striking proportion of oocytes are predestined to be chromosomally abnormal. But the frequency of exchangeless chromosomes is not affected by maternal age. (2020-12-10)

Breast cancer survivors are less likely to get pregnant, but often have healthy babies and good long-term health
A large meta-analysis of breast cancer survivors of childbearing age indicated that they are less likely than the general public to get pregnant, and they face higher risk of certain complications such as preterm labor. However, most survivors who do get pregnant deliver healthy babies and have no adverse effects on their long-term survival, according to data presented at the 2020 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. (2020-12-09)

Participation in competitive sport in adolescence brings midlife health benefits to women
Females who participate in competitive sport during adolescence have better fitness at midlife than do females with no competitive sport background in adolescence, reveals a study conducted at the University of Jyväskylä. (2020-12-07)

Gestational age linked to ADHD in children with Down syndrome
A new study by the UC Davis MIND Institute finds a connection between gestational age and ADHD in children with Down syndrome. An earlier gestational age is linked to higher ADHD symptoms later in childhood. (2020-12-04)

Small and large birth weight linked to genetics of mother and baby -- except in tiniest babies
Genetics of mother and baby contribute to most cases where babies are born very large or very small, according to new research. (2020-12-02)

Protein commonly screened for in pregnancy is linked to gestational diabetes
Laboratory research and analysis of epidemiological data by Silvia Corvera, MD, and Tiffany Moore Simas, MD, MPH, MEd, and colleagues show that low levels of a protein commonly seen in screening tests for chromosomal disorders during the first trimester of pregnancy is associated with adipose tissue remodeling, glucose resistance and gestational diabetes mellitus in pregnant women. (2020-11-30)

Early birth linked to greater risk of hospital visits during childhood
Being born early (before 37 weeks' gestation) is associated with a higher risk of hospital admission throughout childhood than being born at full term (40 weeks' gestation), finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-11-25)

Early life risk factors predict higher obesity and cardiometabolic risk
Early life risk factors in the first 1000 days cumulatively predict higher obesity and cardiometabolic risk in early adolescence, according to new research led by the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute. The study is the first to evaluate the combined influence of early life risk factors with direct measures of adiposity (body mass index, fat-mass index) and metabolic risk in early adolescence. (2020-11-16)

Children born extremely preterm are more likely to be diagnosed with depression
A study using extensive nationwide registry data showed that girls born extremely preterm, earlier than 28 weeks gestational age, were three times more likely to be diagnosed with depression than peers born close to the expected date of delivery. Increased risk of depression also applied to girls and boys with poor fetal growth born full-term and post-term. The effects of poor fetal growth were more evident with increasing gestational age. (2020-11-12)

In mice, cadmium exposure during pregnancy linked to obesity in female offspring
In a mouse study aimed at modeling human exposure to the toxic metal cadmium, researchers found that female offspring of mice exposed to cadmium during pregnancy became obese in adulthood, developed fatty livers and could not process glucose normally. Male offspring were not affected in the same way. The study also sheds light on how cadmium exposure could affect mitochondrial function and developmental signaling pathways in the liver. (2020-11-12)

Model helps predict which infants may develop NAS
A new Vanderbilt-designed prediction model may make it easier to determine which infants will go on to develop neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), a drug withdrawal syndrome in newborns that occurs after exposure to opioids during pregnancy. (2020-11-12)

Sixty-year old cohort study reveals adolescent value predicts wellbeing in older age
Subjective wellbeing leads to better health, but we did not know what in our younger years determines our wellbeing in old age. Researchers at the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science have demonstrated that adolescents who valued their interests and curiosity had higher wellbeing in old age from a 60-year-old cohort in the UK. We additionally found that adolescents with low self-control who valued money and steady jobs had significantly lower wellbeing in old age. (2020-11-11)

Age gates on alcohol websites are ineffective, Texas A&M research shows
''Age gates'' that aim to keep underage users off alcohol websites are mostly ineffective, a Texas A&M University alcohol researcher found. (2020-11-11)

Safe pregnancy is possible for women with interstitial lung disease
A new study shows that women with interstitial lung disease (ILD) related to autoimmune disease may not need to terminate their pregnancies--despite the increased risk of adverse outcomes--provided they have close monitoring from their team of multidisciplinary physicians before, during and after pregnancy. Results of the research was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology's annual meeting. (2020-11-06)

Diet and lifestyle during pregnancy linked to modifications in infants' DNA
A new study has shown pregnant women with obesity could reduce the health risks for their infants through improved diet and more physical activity. (2020-11-06)

Using artificial intelligence can improve pregnant women's health
Disorders such as congenital heart birth defects or macrosomia, gestational diabetes and preterm birth can be detected earlier when artificial intelligence is used. In the latter case, studies into cases involving artificial intelligence found a correlation between the number of pre-term births and the environmental pollution to which the pregnant women had been previously exposed. (2020-11-04)

Starting kindergarten on the right foot
Going into kindergarten already well-prepared gives a child advantagesgives a child many advantages later in life and lowers costs for society in the long term, researchers in Canada find. (2020-11-02)

Neanderthal children grew and were weaned similar to us
From the analysis of three milk teeth belonging to Neanderthal children who lived between 70,000 and 45,000 years ago in Northeastern Italy, it emerges that their growth rate was very similar to ours: the discovery leads to exclude that late weaning could be among the causes that led to the disappearance of this human species (2020-11-02)

Mammography screening saves lives also in older age
Mammography, which is an x-ray picture of the breast, is efficient also for women over the age of 70. For women invited to regular mammography screening over the age of 70, the reduction in mortality rate was significant. This according to a vast new study from Sweden. (2020-10-20)

Blood tests could be developed to help predict pregnancy complications new study suggests
UCLA researchers say a blood test commonly used to detect fetal genetic abnormalities may help predict complications associated with pregnancy before symptoms develop. Their preliminary study, appearing in Epigenetics, links certain cell-free DNA signatures to adverse outcomes in pregnancy, including ischemic placental disease and gestational diabetes. (2020-10-13)

Young women who suffer a heart attack have worse outcomes than men
Women aged 50 or younger who suffer a heart attack are more likely than men to die over the following 11 years, according to a new study published in the European Heart Journal. The study found that women were less likely to undergo therapeutic invasive procedures after admission to hospital with a heart attack or to be treated with certain medical therapies upon discharge, such as aspirin, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors and statins. (2020-10-13)

Age does not contribute to COVID-19 susceptibility
Scientists have estimated that the age of an individual does not indicate how likely they are to be infected by SARS-CoV-2. However, development of symptoms, progression of the disease, and mortality are age-dependent. (2020-10-12)

Pregnancy complications linked to heightened risk of heart disease and stroke in later life
Pregnancy complications such as miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, diabetes in pregnancy (gestational diabetes) and pre-term birth are linked to a heightened risk of heart disease in later life, suggests an overarching (umbrella) analysis of data published by The BMJ today. (2020-10-07)

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