Current Gestures News and Events | Page 2

Current Gestures News and Events, Gestures News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 2 of 10 | 369 Results
A little kindness goes a long way for worker performance and health
Small gestures of kindness by employers can have big impacts on employees' health and work performance, according to an international team of researchers. The team specifically examined the effects of employers enhancing the lunches of bus drivers in China with fresh fruit and found that it reduced depression among the drivers and increased their confidence in their own work performance. (2019-09-10)

Positive effect of music and dance on dementia proven by New Zealand study
Stereotypically viewed as passive and immobile, a University of Otago, New Zealand, pilot study has shown the powerful influence music and dance can have on older adults with dementia. (2019-08-07)

The UC3M programs a humanoid robot to communicate in sign language
Scientists from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) have published a paper featuring the results of research into interactions between robots and deaf people, in which they were able to programme a humanoid - called TEO - to communicate in sign language. (2019-07-08)

Study: Social robots can benefit hospitalized children
A new study demonstrates, for the first time, that 'social robots' used in support sessions held in pediatric units at hospitals can lead to more positive emotions in sick children. (2019-06-26)

Soft, social robot brings coziness to homes -- and classrooms
A new social robot that can be customized with handcrafted material, such as wood and wool, brings simplicity and fun to home robotics -- and will soon be used to help teach math to fourth graders. (2019-05-22)

Gestures and visual animations reveal cognitive origins of linguistic meaning
Gestures and visual animations can help reveal the cognitive origins of meaning, indicating that our minds can assign a linguistic structure to new informational content 'on the fly' -- even if it is not linguistic in nature. (2019-04-25)

Artificial intelligence enables recognizing and assessing a violinist's bow movements
In playing music, gestures are extremely important, in part because they are directly related to the sound and the expressiveness of the musicians. Today, technology exists that captures movement and is capable of detecting gestural details very precisely. (2019-04-02)

Gesturing related to storytelling style, not nationality, study
New research by University of Alberta scientists suggests that the amount you gesture when telling a story has more to do with what you're saying than where you're from. (2019-03-26)

Imperceptible movements guide juvenile zebra finch song development
New research from Cornell University shows zebra finches engage in socially guided vocal learning, where they learn their songs by watching their mothers' reactions to their immature songs. (2019-01-31)

Do bigger brains equal smarter dogs? New study offers answers
Larger dogs have better short-term memory and self-control than smaller breeds, according to research led by the Arizona Canine Cognition Center at the University of Arizona. (2019-01-28)

Telling stories using rhythmic gesture helps children improve their oral skills
For the first time it has been shown that a brief training session with rhythmic gestures has immediate benefits for narrative discourse in children of 5 and 6 years of age in a study published recently in Developmental Psychology led by Pilar Prieto, ICREA research professor and coordinator of the Prosodic Studies Group and of the Department of Translation and Language Sciences, together with her collaborators, Ingrid Vilà-Giménez and Alfonso Igualada (Cognition and Language Research Group, Open University of Catalonia). (2019-01-17)

Force Push VR brings Jedi powers to life
Force Push provides a more physical, nuanced experience than traditional hand controllers allow in VR. It responds to the speed and magnitude of hand gestures to accelerate or decelerate objects in a way that users can understand intuitively. (2018-11-30)

Football coaches between victories, defeats and emotions
Football coaches who have their emotions under control are more successful. This has now been reported in the Sports journal by scientists from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main. Because emotions and how they are dealt with have a great impact on the performance of coaches and therefore also the team as a whole. (2018-11-13)

New tool streamlines the creation of moving pictures
It's often easy to imagine balloons soaring or butterflies fluttering across a still image, but realizing this vision through computer animation is easier said than done. Now, a team of researchers has developed a new tool that makes animating such images much simpler. (2018-10-24)

Energy harvesting and innovative inputs highlight tech show gadgetry
A battery-free energy harvester, a novel conductive system for smartwatches, and a prototype that extends body language to the human ear feature at new tech conference. (2018-10-15)

Clues that suggest people are lying may be deceptive, study shows
The verbal and physical signs of lying are harder to detect than people believe, a study suggests. (2018-10-12)

Even small gifts boost business
If a sales agent brings their customer a small gift, the customer is much more likely to make a purchase, a study by the university of Zurich has shown. This works particularly well when the person receiving the gift is the boss. The fact that even small gifts can result in conflicts of interest has implications for the debate about where the line should be drawn between tokens of appreciation and attempted bribery. (2018-10-04)

Scientists unlock secret of how the brain encodes speech
People like the late Stephen Hawking are unable to speak because their muscles are paralyzed. Scientists want to help these individuals communicate by developing a brain machine interface to decode the commands the brain is sending to the tongue, palate, lips and larynx. New research has moved science closer by unlocking new information about how the brain encodes speech. They discovered the brain controls speech in a similar way to how it controls arm movements. (2018-09-26)

The art of storytelling: researchers explore why we relate to characters
For thousands of years, humans have relied on storytelling to engage, to share emotions and to relate personal experiences. Now, psychologists at McMaster University are exploring the mechanisms deep within the brain to better understand just what happens when we communicate. (2018-09-13)

Decoding robotic surgery skills
Researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of USC are looking to technology to help deconstruct expert surgeons' robotic surgery skills so they can create an objective, standardized way to train the next generation of surgeons. (2018-09-11)

Talking to an android
Researchers have significantly upgraded the interaction system for the conversational android ERICA, by implementing 'backchanneling' and 'attentive listening' ability. (2018-08-20)

Despite negative consequences, benevolent sexism helps in search for mate
Some women may like it when a man opens the door on a first date or offers to pay the bill at dinner, while others may find the gestures insulting. New research provides an alternative explanation as to why some women respond positively. (2018-07-25)

Emotional robot lets you feel how it's 'feeling'
Cornell University researchers have developed a prototype of a robot that can express 'emotions' through changes in its outer surface. The robot's skin covers a grid of texture units whose shapes change based on the robot's feelings. (2018-07-16)

Chimpanzees start using a new tool-use gesture during an alpha male take over
Similar to humans, non-human primates combine gestures, facial expressions, and vocalizations in various ways to communicate effectively. Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology investigated one such signal, the 'leaf clip' gesture, which re-emerged in a wild chimpanzee group during an alpha takeover. Importantly, the gesture was produced only by adult male chimpanzees, immediately preceded their pant hoot vocalizations and was associated with acoustic changes in those calls. (2018-06-28)

Controlling robots with brainwaves and hand gestures
System enables people to correct robot mistakes on multi-choice problems. (2018-06-20)

Human encouragement might influence how dogs solve problems
Human encouragement might influence how dogs solve problems. (2018-06-06)

Patients and caregivers value caring, continuity, and accountability in care transitions
In the transition from hospital to home, patients and caregivers seek clear accountability, continuity, and caring attitudes across the care continuum. One-hundred and thirty-eight patients and 110 family caregivers participating in focus groups and interviews identified three desired outcomes of care transition services: feeling prepared and able to implement care plans, unambiguous accountability from the healthcare system, and feeling cared for and cared about by clinicians. (2018-05-14)

Wearable ring, wristband allow users to control smart tech with hand gestures
New technology created by a team of Georgia Tech researchers could make controlling text or other mobile applications as simple as '1-2-3.' Using acoustic chirps emitted from a ring and received by a wristband, like a smartwatch, the system is able to recognize 22 different micro finger gestures that could be programmed to various commands -- including a T9 keyboard interface, a set of numbers, or application commands like playing or stopping music. (2018-05-14)

Paint job transforms walls into sensors, interactive surfaces
Walls are what they are -- big, dull dividers. With a few applications of conductive paint and some electronics, however, walls can become smart infrastructure that sense human touch, and detect things like gestures and when appliances are used. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and Disney Research found that they could transform dumb walls into smart walls at relatively low cost using simple tools and techniques, such as a paint roller. (2018-04-23)

Dartmouth College brings smartwatch innovations to CHI2018
The latest developmental research seeks to increase the functionality of wearables while also adding to the overall user experience. (2018-04-19)

Scholars: In #MeToo movement, lessons of restorative and transitional justice important
A new paper from a team of University of Illinois legal scholars argues that reformers of the burgeoning #MeToo movement ought to heed the core principles of restorative and transitional justice and take into account the needs of both victims and offenders, as well as the larger community. (2018-04-13)

'Social brain' networks are altered at a young age in autism
As infants develop, they respond to social cues such as voices, faces and gestures. Their brain develops a network of regions that specialise in translating these cues, the 'social brain'. A common observation in infants later diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders is reduced sensitivity towards these social cues. A team of researchers from the University of Geneva brings evidence of how this phenomenon hinders the normal development of the social brain at early developmental stages. (2018-02-27)

Bonobo and chimpanzee gestures share many meanings
If a bonobo and a chimpanzee were to meet face to face, they could probably understand each other's gestures. In an article publishing 27 February in the open access journal PLOS Biology, researchers from the Universities of St Andrews, York, and Kyoto have found that many of the gestures used by bonobos and chimpanzees share the same meanings. (2018-02-27)

Bonobo and chimpanzee gestures share multiple meanings
Two closely related great ape species, the bonobo and chimpanzee, use gestures that share the same meaning researchers have found. (2018-02-27)

UBC engineers advance the capability of wearable tech
Creating the perfect wearable device to monitor muscle movement, heart rate and other tiny bio-signals without breaking the bank has inspired scientists to look for a simpler and more affordable tool. Now, a team of researchers at UBC's Okanagan campus have developed a practical way to monitor and interpret human motion, in what may be the missing piece of the puzzle when it comes to wearable technology. (2018-02-22)

Chimpanzee self-control is related to intelligence, Georgia State study finds
As is true in humans, chimpanzees' general intelligence is correlated to their ability to exert self-control and delay gratification, according to new research at Georgia State University. (2018-02-08)

Autism might be better detected using new two-minute questionnaire
Researchers at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School have developed a two-minute questionnaire for parents that could help pediatricians and other primary care providers detect autism in toddlers, at a time when intervention might be crucial. The Psychological Development Questionnaire (PDQ-1) had an 88 percent likelihood of correctly identifying which of the youngster that screened positive because of the questionnaire had autism spectrum disorder (ASD). (2018-02-05)

Dyslexia: When spelling problems impair writing acquisition
Several studies have sought to identify the source of the problems encountered by individuals with dyslexia when they read. Little attention has been paid to the mechanisms involved in writing. Researchers decided to look at the purely motor aspects of writing in children diagnosed with dyslexia. Their results show that orthographic processing in children with dyslexia is so laborious that it can modify or impair writing skills, despite the absence of dysgraphia in these children. (2017-11-28)

Defending the science of infant imitation
In a counter-response recently published in the journal Developmental Science, Elizabeth Simpson and her co-authors argue that the Current Biology study failed to use appropriate methods, and is highly flawed. She argues that there is overwhelming evidence that infant imitation is real. (2017-11-28)

Love actually: Americans agree on what makes people 'feel the love'
Americans may disagree on many things, but love might not be one of them. According to researchers, people in the US largely agree about what makes them feel loved, coming to a general consensus that it may be small gestures that matter most. (2017-11-06)

Page 2 of 10 | 369 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.