Current Gibbons News and Events

Current Gibbons News and Events, Gibbons News Articles.
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Research sheds new light on cause of deadly lung disease
New research could shed light on the mystery cause of a lung disease that is a major killer, and potentially unlock new treatments (2020-12-08)

A deadly long-distance hunter: DNA study reveals insights about the scimitar-toothed cat
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have mapped the entire nuclear genome of a sabre-toothed cat. The genetic study reveals new insights about a socially intelligent pack animal, specialized in endurance-based hunting over long distances. (2020-10-15)

New fossil ape is discovered in India
A 13-million-year-old fossil unearthed in northern India comes from a newly discovered ape, the earliest known ancestor of the modern-day gibbon. The discovery fills a major void in the ape fossil record and provides important new evidence about when the ancestors of today's gibbon migrated to Asia from Africa. (2020-09-08)

New and diverse experiences linked to enhanced happiness, new study shows
New and diverse experiences are linked to enhanced happiness, and this relationship is associated with greater correlation of brain activity, new research has found. The results reveal a previously unknown connection between our daily physical environments and our sense of well-being. (2020-05-18)

Babies born prematurely can catch up their immune systems, study finds
Researchers from King's College London & Homerton University Hospital have found babies born before 32 weeks' gestation can rapidly acquire some adult immune functions after birth, equivalent to that achieved by infants born at term. (2020-03-09)

Study calculates links between prescription medications and risk for suicide
A review of 922 prescription medications taken by almost 150 million people over an 11-year period shows that just 10 of these drugs were associated with an increased rate of suicide attempts. (2019-11-05)

Georgia State research finds early life racial discrimination linked to depression, accelerated aging
Early life stress from racial discrimination puts African Americans at greater risk for accelerated aging, a marker for premature development of serious health problems and perhaps a shorter life expectancy, according to a study led by a Georgia State University psychology researcher. (2019-09-30)

Gibbons' large, long-term territories put them under threat from habitat loss
Wild gibbons living in the peat swamps of southern Borneo require between 20 and 50 hectares of forest territory for each group, making their populations particularly vulnerable to habitat loss, according to a study publishing July 31 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Dr. Susan Cheyne at the Borneo Nature foundation, and colleagues. (2019-07-31)

Offering children a wide variety and large quantities of snack food encourages them to eat more
Offering children a wide variety and large quantities of snack food encourages them to eat more - and may contribute to weight problems, a new study has found. The research, led by the Murdoch Children's Research Institute and published in the latest International Journal of Obesity, also found that how snacks are presented (in a large or small container) has little influence on how much children snack. (2019-07-19)

Study reveals new genomic roots of ecological adaptation in polar bear evolution
Scientists from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Vanderbilt University and Clark University have shed new light on the genomic foundation of the polar bear's ecological adaption by pinpointing rapid changes in the bear's gene copy numbers in response to a diet shifting from vegetation to meat. (2019-06-17)

2017 North Korean nuclear test 10 times larger than previous tests, new study finds
North Korea detonated a nuclear device in 2017 equivalent to about 250 kilotons of TNT, a new study in AGU's Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth estimates. The 2017 test was an order of magnitude larger than the previous five underground tests at North Korea's Punggye-ri test site, according to the new study, which took into account the geology of the test site to estimate the size of the explosions from distant seismic recordings of the blasts. (2019-06-03)

Risk of suicide attempt by children doubles if parent uses opioids
In a tale of two epidemics, researchers from the University of Chicago and the University of Pittsburgh found that children of parents who use opioids have an increased risk of attempting suicide. (2019-05-22)

Parental use of prescription opioids associated with risk of suicide attempt by children
Opioid use by parents was associated with increased risk of suicide attempt by their children in a study that linked medical claims for opioid prescriptions for parents with medical claims for suicide attempts by their children. This observational study included 184,000 children whose parents used opioids and about 148,000 children whose parents didn't. (2019-05-22)

For-profit dialysis provider charges private insurers 4 times more than government payers
Private insurers covering people receiving treatment for dialysis paid four times more than government insurance programs such as Medicare paid for the same service. Government programs paid, on average, $248 per dialysis session, compared with $1,041 per session for people with private insurance. (2019-05-14)

Mammals' unique arms started evolving before the dinosaurs existed
One of the things that makes mammals special is our diverse forelimbs -- bat wings, whale flippers, gibbon arms, and cheetah legs have evolved to do different, specialized tasks. Scientists wanted to see where this mammalian trait started evolving, so they examined fossils from early mammal relatives to see when the upper arm bones started diversifying. They discovered that the trait took root 270 million years ago -- 30 million years before the earliest dinosaurs existed. (2019-03-18)

ZEB1 throttles therapeutic target, protecting KRAS-mutant lung cancer
A cellular identity switch protects a cancer-promoting genetic pathway from targeted therapy, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center today reported in Science Translational Medicine. (2019-03-13)

Surgery for uncomplicated appendicitis in adults is effective and safe
There has been a growing debate over whether uncomplicated appendicitis should be treated with antibiotics rather than surgery. UCLA research finds that more than 97 percent of the surgeries for appendicitis were laparoscopic, or minimally invasive, and most patients were discharged the same day or the next day. Only 3 percent of the procedures resulted in complications. This indicates that surgery is safe and effective. (2019-02-25)

Late Miocene ape maxilla (upper jaw) discovered in western India
An ape maxilla (upper jaw) from the Late Miocene found in the Kutch basin, in western India, significantly extends the southern range of ancient apes in the Indian Peninsula, according to a study published in Nov. 14, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ansuya Bhandari from the Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeosciences, Lucknow, India, and colleagues. (2018-11-14)

First study of Humpback whale survivors of orca attacks in the Southeastern Pacific
Scars left by orca attacks indicate that most victims are young whales on the first trip from breeding to feeding grounds. Increasing numbers of scars may mean that there are more orcas in the Southern Pacific, researchers say. (2018-11-06)

Where have all the turtles gone, and why does it matter?
About 61 percent of the world's 356 turtle species are threatened or already extinct, and the decline could have ecological consequences. (2018-09-12)

For one tropical tree, effective seed dispersal relies especially on elephants
Deer, bears, gibbons, but especially elephants, play an important role in seed dispersal for a large-fruited tree in the forests of Thailand, according to a new study publishing July 18 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Kim McConkey of the National Institute of Advanced Studies in Bangalore and colleagues from BIOTEC, Thailand. The data illustrate the complexity of forest ecology and hint that, at least for this one species, changes have occurred that have diminished its overall reproductive success. (2018-07-18)

The lady's ape: Extinct gibbon discovered in royal ancient Chinese tomb
A new genus and species of gibbon has been identified in the most unexpected of places -- interred in the tomb of an ancient Chinese noble-woman. (2018-06-21)

Computational method puts finer point on multispecies genomic comparisons
A new computational tool will potentially help geneticists to better understand what makes a human a human, or how to differentiate species in general, by providing more detailed comparative information about genome function. (2018-06-20)

Rhesus macaque model offers route to study Zika brain pathology
Rhesus macaque monkeys infected in utero with Zika virus develop similar brain pathology to human infants, according to a report by researchers at the California National Primate Research Center and School of Veterinary Medicine at UC Davis. The findings may open up new ways to study the infection in an animal model. (2018-06-20)

Comprehensive care physician model improves care, lowers hospitalization
Patients who need frequent hospitalization account for a disproportionate amount of health care spending. In 2012, the University of Chicago Medicine began enrolling patients in a clinical trial designed to reduce frequent stays. Hospitalization rates for these patients were 15 to 22 percent lower. They also reported a better experience. (2018-05-16)

Increase in heart rate as blood pressure falls could be early sign of neurological disease
A simple bedside test that matches a change in heart rate with a drop in blood pressure after a patient stands may help doctors diagnose certain degenerative brain diseases, according to a new study led by researchers at NYU School of Medicine. (2018-03-28)

Novel classification can lead to new ways to diagnose and treat cancer
A novel approach to studying cancer has enabled researchers to group about 10,000 human cancers of 32 different types into 10 classes based on the molecular pathways that drive tumor growth. A better understanding of these pathways can potentially lead to novel ways to diagnose and treat cancer. (2018-02-12)

Exposure to trees, the sky and birdsong in cities beneficial for mental wellbeing
Researchers at King's College London, landscape architects J & L Gibbons and art foundation Nomad Projects have used smartphone-based technology to assess the relationship between nature in cities and momentary mental wellbeing in real time. The study will be published in BioScience. (2018-01-09)

Mammals switched to daytime activity after dinosaur extinction
Mammals only started being active in the daytime after non-avian dinosaurs were wiped out about 66 million years ago (mya), finds a new study led by UCL and Tel Aviv University's Steinhardt Museum of Natural History. (2017-11-06)

Coloring the heartbeat
Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death around the world. Finding easy early ways to screen for good drugs is vital (2017-11-05)

Few women with history of breast cancer and ovarian cancer take a recommended genetic test
More than 80 percent of women living with a history of breast or ovarian cancer at high-risk of having a gene mutation have never taken the test that can detect it. (2017-08-18)

New 13-million-year-old infant skull sheds light on ape ancestry
The discovery in Kenya of a remarkably complete fossil ape skull reveals what the common ancestor of all living apes and humans may have looked like. (2017-08-09)

Quality of psychiatric treatment -- not number of beds -- should be focus of suicide prevention
Health care providers should focus on the overall quality of psychiatric care, depression screening and outpatient services to prevent suicide, not the number of available inpatient psychiatric beds, argue researchers from the University of Chicago and Columbia University in a new statistical analysis. (2017-06-14)

Substantial differences between US counties for death rates from ischemic heart disease, stroke
Although the absolute difference in US county-level cardiovascular disease mortality rates have declined substantially over the past 35 years for both ischemic heart disease and cerebrovascular disease, large differences remain, according to a study published by JAMA. (2017-05-16)

Mandatory headwear does not influence surgical site infections
Surgical site infections are noteworthy and costly health complications. Patients with infections are likely to stay longer an intensive care unit and a hospital. Those with infections have an increased risk of hospital readmission or death. In an attempt to address this, hospital policy in the United States changed in February 2016 and made it obligatory to wear a bouffant cap and not traditional surgeons caps in order to prevent infections from occurring. (2017-05-10)

The New England Journal of Medicine hosts summit to explore clinical trial data sharing
The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) will host the 'Aligning Incentives for Sharing Clinical Trial Data' summit and live web event on April 3-4, 2017 in Boston, MA. The goal of the summit is to initiate an open and balanced discussion among clinical trialists, data analysts, and patient participants, as well as the government and funding agencies that support research, to identify sustainable solutions for the complex issues around sharing clinical trial data. (2017-03-20)

New broad-spectrum antiviral protein can inhibit HIV, other pathogens in some primates
University of Colorado Boulder researchers have discovered that a protein-coding gene called Schlafen11 (SLFN11) may induce a broad-spectrum cellular response against infection by viruses including HIV-1. (2017-01-18)

Research reveals insight into how lung cancer spreads
A cellular component known as the Golgi apparatus may play a role in how lung cancer metastasizes, according to researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center whose findings were reported in the Nov. 21 online issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. (2016-11-21)

Virologists unravel mystery of late C20th gibbon leukaemia outbreak
The mystery of an outbreak of lymphoma and leukaemia in gibbon colonies in the US, Bermuda and Thailand in the late 1960s and early 1970s has been solved by animal disease detectives at The University of Nottingham. (2016-11-17)

New subtypes of lung cancer can lead to personalized therapies with better outcome
Analysis of vast amounts of molecular data from a set of more than 1,000 non-small cell lung cancers identifies distinct subtypes, each with its own molecular profile and potentially different response to therapy. (2016-10-24)

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