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Current Glacier News and Events, Glacier News Articles.
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Climate science: Amazon fires may enhance Andean glacier melting
Burning of the rainforest in southwestern Amazonia (the Brazilian, Peruvian and Bolivian Amazon) may increase the melting of tropical glaciers in the Andes, according to a study in Scientific Reports. (2019-11-28)
Icebergs as a source of nutrients
The importance of icebergs as an important source of nutrients in the polar regions has long been discussed. (2019-11-20)
Satellite and reanalysis data can substitute field observations over Asian water tower
Satellite data sets are found reliable to reproduce the total column water vapor characteristics over the Tibetan Plateau. (2019-11-12)
Drones help map Iceland's disappearing glaciers
Dr. Kieran Baxter from the University of Dundee has created composite images that compare views from 1980s aerial surveys to modern-day photos captured with the help of state-of-the-art technology. (2019-10-30)
Reframing Antarctica's meltwater pond dangers to ice shelves and sea level
On Antarctica, meltwater ponds riddle a kilometer-thick, 10,000-year-old ice shelf, which shatters just weeks later. (2019-10-25)
Disappearing Peruvian glaciers
It is common knowledge that glaciers are melting in most areas across the globe. (2019-10-07)
Surface melting causes Antarctic glaciers to slip faster towards the ocean
Study shows for the first time a direct link between surface melting and short bursts of glacier acceleration in Antarctica. (2019-09-20)
Ecologist revives world's longest running succession study
With a grant from National Geographic, CU Denver assistant professor assembled a team to hunt down and expand eight long-forgotten, 103-year-old succession plots. (2019-09-16)
Underwater soundscapes reveal differences in marine environments
Storms, boat traffic, animal noises and more contribute to the underwater sound environment in the ocean, even in areas considered protected. (2019-09-04)
Vintage film shows Thwaites Glacier ice shelf melting faster than previously observed
Newly available archival film has revealed the eastern ice shelf of Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica is melting faster than previous estimates, suggesting the shelf may collapse sooner than expected. (2019-09-02)
Glacier-fed rivers may consume atmospheric carbon dioxide
Glacier-fed rivers in northern Canada may be consuming significant amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-08-27)
Tidewater glaciers: Melting underwater far faster than previously estimated?
A tidewater glacier in Alaska is melting underwater at rates upwards of two orders of magnitude greater than what is currently estimated, sonar surveys reveal. (2019-07-25)
Underwater glacial melting is occurring at higher rates than modeling predicts
Researchers have developed a new method to allow for the first direct measurement of the submarine melt rate of a tidewater glacier, and, in doing so, they concluded that current theoretical models may be underestimating glacial melt by up to two orders of magnitude. (2019-07-25)
Underwater glacial melting occurring much faster than predicted
Underwater melting of tidewater glaciers is occurring much faster than previously thought, according to a new study by researchers at Rutgers and the University of Oregon. (2019-07-25)
Volcanoes shaped the climate before humankind
Five large volcanic eruptions occurred in the early 19th century. (2019-07-24)
USF geoscientists discover mechanisms controlling Greenland ice sheet collapse
New radar technology allowed USF geoscientists to look at Greenland's dynamic ice-ocean interface that drives sea level rise. (2019-07-19)
Strong storms also play big role in Antarctic ice shelf collapse
Warming temperatures and changes in ocean circulation and salinity are driving the breakup of ice sheets in Antarctica, but a new study suggests that intense storms may help push the system over the edge. (2019-07-18)
New virus found in one-third of all countries may have coevolved with human lineage
Published in Nature Microbiology, a new study has investigated the origin and evolution of a virus called crAssphage, which may have coevolved with human lineage. (2019-07-11)
New measurements shed light on the impact of water temperatures on glacier calving
Calving, or the breaking off of icebergs from glaciers, has increased at many glaciers along the west coast of Svalbard. (2019-07-01)
Unlocking secrets of the ice worm
WSU researchers have identified an ice worm on Vancouver Island that is closely related to ice worms 1,200 miles away in southern Alaska. (2019-06-26)
A 3D view of climatic behavior at the third pole
Research across several areas of the 'Third Pole' -- the high-mountain region centered on the Tibetan Plateau -- shows a seasonal cycle in how near-surface temperature changes with elevation. (2019-06-19)
Mountain-dwellers can adapt to melting glaciers without caring about climate change
For many people, climate change feels like a distant threat -- something that happens far away, or far off in the future. (2019-06-10)
Patagonia ice sheets thicker than previously thought, study finds
A new study UC Irvine and collaborators of Patagonia's ice fields finds that many glaciers in the region are much thicker than previously thought. (2019-06-03)
Asia's glaciers provide buffer against drought
A new study to assess the contribution that Asia's high mountain glaciers make to relieving water stress in the region is published this week (May 29, 2019) in the journal Nature. (2019-05-29)
Melting small glaciers could add 10 inches to sea levels
A new review of glacier research data paints a picture of a future planet with a lot less ice and a lot more water. (2019-05-22)
24% of West Antarctic ice is now unstable
In only 25 years, ocean melting has caused ice thinning to spread across West Antarctica so rapidly that a quarter of its glacier ice is now affected, according to a new study. (2019-05-16)
Study finds 24 percent of West Antarctic ice is now unstable
In only 25 years, ocean melting has caused ice thinning to spread across West Antarctica so rapidly that a quarter of its glacier ice is now affected, according to a new study. (2019-05-16)
Warming climate threatens microbes in alpine streams, new research shows
Changes to alpine streams fed by glaciers and snowfields due to a warming climate threaten to dramatically alter the types of bacteria and other microbes in those streams, according to new research. (2019-05-15)
New study boosts understanding of how ocean melts Antarctic Ice Sheet
An innovative use of instruments that measure the ocean near Antarctica has helped Australian scientists to get a clearer picture of how the ocean is melting the Antarctic ice sheet. (2019-05-14)
Traces of Roman-era pollution stored in the ice of Mont Blanc
The deepest layers of carbon-14 dated ice found in the French Alps provide a record of atmospheric conditions in the ancient Roman era. (2019-05-09)
Tsunami signals to measure glacier calving in Greenland
Scientists have employed a new method utilizing tsunami signals to calculate the calving magnitude of an ocean-terminating glacier in northwestern Greenland, uncovering correlations between calving flux and environmental factors such as air temperature, ice speed, and ocean tides. (2019-05-08)
Almost half of World Heritage sites could lose their glaciers by 2100
Glaciers are set to disappear completely from almost half of World Heritage sites if business-as-usual emissions continue. (2019-04-30)
Accounting for ice-earth feedbacks at finer scale suggests slower glacier retreat
Accounting for the way the Antarctic ice sheet interacts with the solid earth below -- an important but previously poorly captured phenomena -- reveals that ice sheet collapse events may be delayed for several decades, at this major ice structure. (2019-04-25)
More than 90% of glacier volume in the Alps could be lost by 2100
New research on how glaciers in the European Alps will fare under a warming climate has come up with concerning results. (2019-04-09)
Melting glaciers causing sea levels to rise at ever greater rates
Melting ice sheets in Greenland and the Antarctic as well as ice melt from glaciers all over the world are causing sea levels to rise. (2019-04-08)
Beware a glacier's tongue
Glaciers extending into freshwater lakes can form long, submerged terraces that menacingly rise above the surface when icy chunks fall into the water. (2019-04-02)
New tool maps a key food source for grizzly bears: huckleberries
Researchers have developed a new approach to map huckleberry distribution across Glacier National Park that uses publicly available satellite imagery. (2019-03-26)
Tall ice-cliffs may trigger big calving events -- and fast sea-level rise
Glaciers that drain ice sheets such as Antarctica or Greenland often flow into the ocean, ending in near-vertical cliffs. (2019-03-22)
Mystery of green icebergs may soon be solved
Researchers have proposed a new idea that may explain why some Antarctic icebergs are tinged emerald green rather than the normal blue, potentially solving a decades-long scientific mystery. (2019-03-04)
Thousands of tiny quakes shake Antarctic ice at night
UChicago scientists placed seismometers on the McMurdo Ice Shelf and recorded hundreds of thousands of tiny 'ice quakes' that appear to be caused by pools of partially melted ice expanding and freezing at night. (2019-03-04)
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