Current Glass News and Events

Current Glass News and Events, Glass News Articles.
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Seeing stable topology using instabilities
The researchers explore how topological phases of light in nonlinear optical media undergo the process of modulational instability. (2021-02-19)

Swimming upstream on sound waves
ETH researchers are among the first scientists to have succeeded in propelling microvehicles against a fluid flow using ultrasound. In future, these tiny vehicles are set to be introduced into the human bloodstream, thereby revolutionising the field of medicine. (2021-02-19)

A comparative study of surface hardness between two bioceramic materials
This study aimed to evaluate the setting behaviour of MTA Angelus and NeoMTA by comparing their hardness after placing them in dry and moist conditions. (2021-02-16)

Porous materials unfavorable for coronavirus survival
As COVID-19 spreads via respiratory droplets, researchers have become increasingly interested in the drying of droplets on impermeable and porous surfaces; surfaces that accelerate evaporation can decelerate the spread of the virus. In Physics of Fluids, researchers show a droplet remains liquid for a much shorter time on a porous surface, making it less favorable to survival of the virus. On paper and cloth, the virus survived for only three hours and two days, respectively. (2021-02-09)

Scientists create armour for fragile quantum technology
An ANU-led international team has invented the equivalent of 'body armour' for extremely fragile quantum systems, which will make them robust enough to be used as the basis for a new generation of low-energy electronics. (2021-02-08)

How does incident solar radiation affect urban canyons?
Toyohashi University of Technology proposed a numerical bead model to predict the upward-to-downward reflection ratio of glass bead retro-reflective (RR) material purposed for urban heat island (UHI) mitigation and reducing energy consumption. These results will contribute to existing research on the absorption or reflection of solar radiation to improve urban thermal and lighting conditions, and to reduce building energy consumption. (2021-01-25)

New technique builds super-hard metals from nanoparticles
Brown University researchers have shown a way to make bulk metals by smashing tiny metal nanoparticles together, which allows for customized grain structures and improved mechanical and other properties. (2021-01-22)

What stops flows in glassy materials?
Researchers from the Institute of Mechanics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Hong Kong University of Science and Technology recently conducted experimental studies for the first time on glassy systems composed of nonspherical particles. (2021-01-17)

Spreading the sound
Tsukuba University scientists describe the diffusion of sound in disordered materials, such as glass, using a new mathematical model. This work may lead to stronger and cheaper displays for touchscreen devices. (2021-01-15)

Glass frogs living near roaring waterfalls wave hello to attract mates
A University of California, Berkeley, conservationist has discovered that the glass frog Sachatamia orejuela can be added to the list of species that make use of visual cues in response to their acoustic environments. This is the first time a member of the glass frog family (Centrolenidae) has been observed using visual communication in this manner. (2021-01-15)

Researchers develop laser-based process to 3D print detailed glass objects
Researchers have developed a new laser-based process for 3D printing intricate parts made of glass. With further development, the new method could be useful for making complex optics for vision, imaging, illumination or laser-based applications. (2021-01-12)

Analytical measurements can predict organic solar cell stability
researchers have developed an analytical measurement ''framework'' which could allow organic solar cell researchers and manufacturers to determine which materials will produce the most stable solar cells prior to manufacture. (2021-01-11)

Researchers turn coal powder into graphite in microwave oven
The University of Wyoming team created an environment in a microwave oven to successfully convert raw coal powder into nano-graphite, which is used as a lubricant and in items ranging from fire extinguishers to lithium ion batteries. (2021-01-06)

Neither liquid nor solid
Discovery of liquid glass sheds light on the old scientific problem of the glass transition: An interdisciplinary team of researchers from the University of Konstanz has uncovered a new state of matter, liquid glass, with previously unknown structural elements - new insights into the nature of glass and its transitions. (2021-01-05)

Controlling cardiac waves with light to better understand abnormally rapid heart rhythms
Over 300,000 people die each year in the US due to sudden cardiac death. In many cases, sudden cardiac death is caused by abnormally rapid heart rhythms called tachycardias, which means the heart cannot pump adequate blood to the body. In Chaos, researchers use mice to study tachycardias and find there are intrinsic mechanisms that exist in heart tissue that they hypothesize lead to the self-termination of rapid cardiac rhythm. (2020-12-22)

Scientists suggested a method to improve performance of methanol fuel cells
Fuel cells based on methanol oxidation have a huge potential in the motor and technical industries. To increase their energy performance, scientists suggest using electrodes made of thin palladium-based metallic glass films. A group of researchers from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), Austria, Turkey, Switzerland, and the UK has developed a new metallic glass for this application. The results were reported in the Nanoscale journal. (2020-12-22)

Putting on the pressure improves glass for fiber optics
Rapid, accurate communication worldwide is possible via fiber optic cables, but as good as they are, they are not perfect. Now, researchers from Penn State and AGC Inc. in Japan suggest that the silica glass used for these cables would have less signal loss if it were manufactured under high pressure. (2020-12-22)

Turning sweat against itself with a metal-free antiperspirant
Body odor is an unpleasant smell, produced when bacteria living on the skin break down the proteins in sweat. To avoid stinking, some people apply antiperspirants that clog sweat ducts with foreign materials, such as metals, to slow perspiration. As a step toward a more natural solution, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have turned sweat against itself using an evaporation-based approach in which the salts in sweat create a gel-like plug. (2020-12-16)

What lessons can medicine learn from Father Christmas?
As Father Christmas gears up for the busiest 24 hours of his year, what skills does he use to get a seemingly impossible job done effectively and safely - and can they be applied to medicine? (2020-12-16)

Trapping nanoparticles with optical tweezers
In new research published in EPJ E, Janine Emile and Olivier Emile at the University of Rennes, France, demonstrate a novel tweezer design, which enabled them to trap fluorescent particles just 200 nanometres across for the first time. (2020-12-11)

A theory as clear as glass
Scientists at The University of Tokyo ran molecular dynamics simulations to compose a more complete theory of the factors that drive crystallization instead of glass formation. They found that tiny changes in material composition can frustrate crystal growth, leading to vitrification. This work may lead to advances in the field of industrial glassmaking. (2020-12-11)

Bend, don't break: new tool enables economic glass design
Computer scientists develop a design tool that opens up the use of a cost-efficient technology for curved glass panels. The tool is based on a deep neural network and allows for the free-form design of beautiful glass façades. (2020-12-07)

Titanium atom that exists in two places at once in crystal to blame for unusual phenomenon
Bombarding a crystal with neutrons reveals a quantum quirk that frustrates heat transfer. (2020-12-03)

Ozone breaks down THC deposited on surfaces from thirdhand cannabis smoke
Second- and thirdhand tobacco smoke have received lots of attention, but much less is known about the compounds deposited on surfaces from cannabis smoke. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have discovered that ozone --a component of outdoor and indoor air -- can react with tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of cannabis, on glass or cotton surfaces to produce new compounds, which they characterized for the first time. (2020-12-02)

Glass beads from medieval sites suggest more complex trade networks
Glass beads from remote medieval sites in Mali and Senegal suggest long distance trade networks may have been more extensive than previously thought -- while a modern bead fragment also implicates a modern grave looter! (2020-12-02)

African trade routes sketched out by mediaeval beads
The chemical composition of glass beads and their morphological characteristics can reveal where they come from. Archaeologists from the University of Geneva analyzed glass beads found at rural sites in Mali and Senegal from between the 7th and 13th centuries AD. The scientists demonstrate that the glass they are made of probably came from Egypt, the Levantine coast and the Middle East. The results show that international trade linking Africa to Europe and Asia during was connected with local and regional trade. (2020-12-02)

Older adults in wealthier countries drink more alcohol
A new global study finds older people in wealthy countries consume more alcohol than their counterparts in middle-income countries, on average, although a higher cost of alcohol is associated with less frequent drinking. Across counties, people drink less as they get older, but at different rates and starting points. The study was led by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the Robert N. Butler Columbia Aging Center. Findings are published in the journal Addiction. (2020-12-01)

Scientists determine the structure of glass-shaping protein in sponges
Researchers from TU Dresden and the Swiss Light Source at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland are the first to determine the three dimensional (3D) structure of a protein responsible for glass formation in sponges. They explain how the earliest and, in fact, the only known natural protein-mineral crystal is formed. The results were published in the journal PNAS. (2020-11-25)

Breathing problems in teens: COVID-19 or lung injury due to vaping?
In a case series of three teen patients, UC Davis Health pediatricians present common manifestations of COVID-19 and lung injury due to vaping (EVALI). As EVALI and COVID-19 share many symptoms, it is critical for health providers to get the vaping history of teenagers with unexplained breathing problems. (2020-11-19)

Surprises in 'active' aging
Aging is a process that affects not only living beings. Many materials, like plastics and glasses, also age -- ie they change slowly as their particles try to pack better. Biological materials, such as living tissue, show similar behaviour to glasses except that the particles are actual cells with their own propulsion. Researchers at Göttingen University used computer simulations to explore the aging behaviour of these ''living'' glassy systems. Research was published in Physical Review Letters. (2020-11-18)

Virginia Tech lab proves the concept of a natural approach to antiperspirants
The Virginia Tech Nature-Inspired Fluids and Interfaces Lab, led by Associate Profesor Jonathan Boreyko, has just made a major breakthrough in the study of natural antiperspirants. (2020-11-16)

Looking inside the glass
Scientists at The University of Tokyo used electron spectroscopy to probe the coordination structures formed by the silicon atoms in aluminosilicate glass. This work may lead to innovations in the touchscreen and solar panel sectors. (2020-11-16)

Novel glass materials made from organic and inorganic components
Researchers from the Universities of Jena and Cambridge have succeeded in creating a new class of hybrid glass materials that combine organic and inorganic components. To do this, the scientists use special material combinations in which chemical bonds between organometallic and inorganic glasses can be generated. They included materials composed of organometallic networks. This is primarily because their framework structures can be created in a targeted manner. (2020-11-16)

New technology allows more precise view of the smallest nanoparticles
Scientists have reported a new optical imaging technology, using a glass side covered with gold nanodiscs that allows them to monitor changes in the transmission of light and determine the characteristics of nanoparticles as small as 25 nanometers in diameter. (2020-11-16)

Dissecting colloidal glasses using laser as a lancet
IBS researchers in South Korea probe the cage formation of the glass at surgical precision and elucidate the onset of glass transition. (2020-11-11)

Turning heat into power with efficient organic thermoelectric material
Thermoelectric materials can turn a temperature difference into electricity. Organic thermoelectric materials could be used to power wearable electronics or sensors; however, the power output is still very low. An international team led by Jan Anton Koster, Professor of Semiconductor Physics at the University of Groningen, has now produced an n-type organic semiconductor with superior properties that brings these applications a big step closer. Their results were published in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-11-11)

Getting single-crystal diamond ready for electronics
Researchers from Osaka University and collaborating partners polished single-crystal diamond to near-atomic smoothness without damaging it. This will improve the performance and sustainability of future electronics. (2020-11-10)

Higher-resolution imaging of living, moving cells using plasmonic metasurfaces
Researchers at Kyushu University have demonstrated that placing cells on a plasmonic metasurface of self-assembled gold nanoparticle can improve the resolution of images of living cells taken in real-time under a widefield fluorescence microscope. The metasurface effectively confines light emission from parts of the cell near the metasurface to a nano-thickness plane, providing a simple method to improving both axial and lateral resolution. (2020-11-06)

?NTU scientists develop energy-saving 'liquid window'
Scientists at the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a liquid window panel that can simultaneously block the sun to regulate solar transmission, while trapping thermal heat that can be released through the day and night, helping to reduce energy consumption in buildings. (2020-11-05)

Research lays groundwork for ultra-thin, energy efficient photodetector on glass
Though we may not always realize it, photodetectors contribute greatly to the convenience of modern life. Also known as photosensors, photodetectors convert light energy into electrical signals to complete tasks such as opening automatic sliding doors and automatically adjusting a cell phone's screen brightness in different lighting conditions. (2020-11-04)

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