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Current Gold Nanoparticles News and Events, Gold Nanoparticles News Articles.
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Researchers identify nanoparticles that could deliver therapeutic mRNA before birth
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Pennsylvania have identified ionizable lipid nanoparticles that could be used to deliver mRNA as part of fetal therapy. The proof-of-concept study, published today in Science Advances, engineered and screened a number of lipid nanoparticle formulations for targeting mouse fetal organs and has laid the groundwork for testing potential therapies to treat genetic diseases before birth. (2021-01-13)

Strategy tested in mice protects against SARS-CoV-2 & coronaviruses that represent human threats
An immunization strategy tested in mice protects against infection from SARS-CoV-2, as well as from potentially emerging animal coronaviruses, researchers say. (2021-01-12)

Nanoparticle immunization technology could protect against many strains of coronaviruses
Caltech researchers are studying a new type of immunization that may be able to protect against many variants of viruses. (2021-01-12)

University at Buffalo researchers report quantum-limit-approaching chemical sensing chip
University at Buffalo researchers are reporting an advancement of a chemical sensing chip that could lead to handheld devices that detect trace chemicals -- everything from illicit drugs to pollution -- as quickly as a breathalyzer identifies alcohol. (2021-01-11)

'Swiss Army knife' catalyst can make natural gas burn cleaner
'Swiss Army knife' catalyst can bring the combustion temperature of methane down by about half - from above 1400 degrees Kelvin down to 600 to 700 degrees Kelvin. (2021-01-11)

NTU Singapore develops oral insulin nanoparticles that could be an alternative to jabs
NTU Singapore scientists have developed insulin nanoparticles that may become an alternative to insulin injections for diabetics. Delivering insulin orally would be preferable over insulin jabs because it causes less pain, but remains challenging because insulin gets degraded in the gut before it can reach the bloodstream to regulate blood glucose. To overcome this challenge, the scientists designed a nanoparticle loaded with insulin at the core, then coated with alternating layers of insulin and chitosan. (2021-01-11)

Single-dose COVID-19 vaccine triggers antibody response in mice
Across the world, health care workers and high-risk groups are beginning to receive COVID-19 vaccines, offering hope for a return to normalcy amidst the pandemic. However, the vaccines authorized for emergency use in the U.S. require two doses to be effective, which can create problems with logistics and compliance. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have developed a nanoparticle vaccine that elicits a virus-neutralizing antibody response in mice after only a single dose. (2021-01-08)

Nanoparticle vaccine for COVID-19
Researchers at Stanford are working to develop a single-dose vaccine for SARS-CoV-2 that could potentially be stored at room temperature. (2021-01-08)

Heat treatment may make chemotherapy more effective
The study, published in the Journal of Materials Chemistry B, found that ''loading'' a chemotherapy drug on to tiny magnetic particles that can heat up the cancer cells at the same time as delivering the drug to them was up to 34% more effective at destroying the cancer cells than the chemotherapy drug without added heat. (2021-01-05)

Better together: Scientists discover applications of nanoparticles with multiple elements
As catalysts for fuel cells, batteries and processes for carbon dioxide reduction, alloy nanoparticles that are made up of five or more elements are shown to be more stable and durable than single-element nanoparticles. (2021-01-04)

Nanoparticle drug-delivery system developed to treat brain disorders
To facilitate successful delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain, a team of bioengineers, physicians, and collaborators at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Boston Children's Hospital created a nanoparticle platform, which can facilitate therapeutically effective delivery of encapsulated agents in mice with a physically breached or intact BBB. In a mouse model of traumatic brain injury (TBI), they observed that the delivery system showed three times more accumulation in brain than conventional methods of delivery. (2021-01-01)

Understanding nanoparticle entry mechanism into tumors
Announcing a new publication for BIO Integration journal. In this commentary the authors Phei Er Saw and Sangyong Jon from Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, Korea, consider how the entry mechanism of nanoparticles into tumors determines the future direction of nanomedicine development. (2020-12-23)

Nanoparticles could improve oil production
A team of scientists from Siberian Federal University together with their colleagues from Novosibirsk studied the effect of nanoparticles on oil production efficiency. When added to the water that displaces oil from a reservoir, nanoparticles improve the separation of oil drops from mine rock and their washing to the surface. The work received a grant from the Russian Science Foundation, and an article about it was published in the Journal of Molecular Liquids. (2020-12-22)

NTU Singapore scientists invent glue activated by magnetic field
Scientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), have developed a new way to cure adhesives using a magnetic field. (2020-12-22)

'Soft' nanoparticles give plasmons new potential
Rice University scientists couple gold nanoparticles with soft polymers that pull energy from the gold's plasmonic response to light. That energy can then be used to catalyze chemical reactions. (2020-12-22)

New electron microscopy technique offers first look at previously hidden processes
Northwestern researchers have developed a new microscopy method that allows scientists to see the building blocks of 'smart' materials being formed at the nanoscale. (2020-12-22)

Nanotechnology -- nanoparticles as weapons against cancer
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have developed a novel type of nanoparticle that efficiently and selectively kills cancer cells, thus opening up new therapeutic options for the treatment of tumors. (2020-12-18)

Sound waves spin droplets to concentrate, separate nanoparticles
Mechanical engineers at Duke University have devised a method for spinning individual droplets of liquid to concentrate and separate nanoparticles for biomedical purposes. The technique is much more efficient than traditional centrifuge approaches, working its magic in under a minute instead of taking hours or days, and requires only a tiny fraction of the typical sample size. The invention could underline new approaches to applications ranging from precision bioassays to cancer diagnosis. (2020-12-18)

New nanobiomaterial from the silk of a mite with 'promising biomedical properties'
An international team of researchers has developed a new nanomaterial from the silk produced by the Tetranychus lintearius mite. This nanomaterial has the ability to penetrate human cells without damaging them and, therefore, has ''promising biomedical properties''. (2020-12-17)

Physicists solve geometrical puzzle in electromagnetism
A team of scientists have solved the longstanding problem of how electrons move together as a group inside cylindrical nanoparticles. (2020-12-16)

Colorful, magnetic Janus balls could help foil counterfeiters (video)
Counterfeiters who sell knockoffs of popular shoes, handbags and other items are becoming increasingly sophisticated, forcing manufacturers to find new technologies to stay one step ahead. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed tiny ''Janus balls'' that show their colored side under a magnetic field. These microparticles could be useful in inks for anti-counterfeiting tags, which could be verified with an ordinary magnet, the researchers say. (2020-12-16)

SUTD and MIT scientists first to simulate a large-scale virus, M13
Scientists from the Singapore University of Technology and Design and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed a procedure that combines various resolution levels in a computer simulation of a biological virus. Their procedure maps a large-scale model that includes features, such as a virus structure, nanoparticles, etc, to its corresponding coarse-grained molecular model. This approach opens the prospects to a whole-length virus simulation at the molecular level. (2020-12-16)

Catalytic activity of individual cobalt oxide nanoparticles determined
Precious metal-free nanoparticles could serve as powerful catalysts in the future, for example for hydrogen production. To optimize them, researchers must be able to analyze the properties of individual particles. A new method for this has been suggested by a team from Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum and from the University of Duisburg-Essen. The group developed a method using a robotic arm that allows them to select individual particles under an electron microscope and place them on a nanoelectrode for electrochemical analysis. (2020-12-15)

3D printers may be toxic for humans
Several studies that aim to characterize and quantify the release and composition, particle size, and residence time in the indoor environment will be presented in the Exposure and Risk Assessment of 3D Printing and Emerging Materials symposium on December 15, from 12:00-1:30 p.m. ET at the 2020 Society for Risk Analysis virtual Annual Meeting held December 13-17, 2020. (2020-12-15)

Chemists from RUDN University synthesized chitin-based antibiotics
?hemists from RUDN University discovered previously unknown derivatives of chitin, a biopolymer that forms the exoskeletons of insects and carapaces of crayfish and other arthropods. The new compounds and their nanoparticles have antibacterial properties and are able to catalyze chemical reactions. (2020-12-14)

Chemists from RUDN University used crab shells to improve palladium catalysts
?hemists from RUDN University synthesized soluble biopolymers based on chitin from crab shells. Together with palladium, they form effective catalysts for organic reactions, and their nanoparticles can be re-used over ten times. (2020-12-14)

When less is more: A single layer of atoms boosts the nonlinear generation of light
A wide array of technologies, ranging from lasers and optical telecommunication to quantum computing rely on nonlinear optical interaction. Typically, these nonlinear interactions, which allow a beam of light, for example, to change its frequency, are implemented by bulk materials. (2020-12-14)

Researchers control multiple wavelengths of light from a single source
KAIST researchers have synthesized a collection of nanoparticles, known as carbon dots, capable of emitting multiple wavelengths of light from a single particle. Additionally, the team discovered that the dispersion of the carbon dots, or the interparticle distance between each dot, influences the properties of the light the carbon dots emit. The discovery will allow researchers to understand how to control these carbon dots and create new, environmentally responsible displays, lighting, and sensing technology. (2020-12-11)

Trapping nanoparticles with optical tweezers
In new research published in EPJ E, Janine Emile and Olivier Emile at the University of Rennes, France, demonstrate a novel tweezer design, which enabled them to trap fluorescent particles just 200 nanometres across for the first time. (2020-12-11)

Making cheaper, biocompatible E-skin electrodes
DGIST materials scientists and colleagues in Korea have improved electrical conductivity in a polymer electrode for E-skin applications. Their approach is simple and cheap, but further enhancements are needed for the polymer to become a viable alternative to more expensive gold electrodes. The scientists published their findings in the journal Biosensors and Bioelectronics. (2020-12-10)

Researchers identify the physical mechanism that can kill bacteria with gold nanoparticles
A multidisciplinary team of researchers have discovered that the mechanical deformation of bacteria is a toxic mechanism that can kill bacteria with gold nanoparticles. The results of this research are a breakthrough in researchers' understanding the antibacterial effects of nanoparticles and their efforts to find new materials with bactericide properties. (2020-12-10)

Silver linings: Adding silver to the nanoclusters can do wonders for their luminescence
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have discovered that a silver-doped platinum thiolate nanometal complex shows 18-fold greater photoluminescence than the original platinum complex. In their recent paper, they provide insights into the causes of this, crowning a new approach to creating efficient non-toxic and biocompatible compounds for bioimaging. (2020-12-08)

Tiny nanospindles enhance use of ultrasound to fight cancer
Ultrasound can be used to treat cancer when used in combination with molecules that sensitize the system to sound waves. These sonosensitizers generate toxic reactive oxygen species that attack and kill tumor cells. In Applied Physics Review, scientists report a new type of sonosensitizer based on a vanadium-doped titanium dioxide that enhances the amount of damage ultrasound inflicts on tumors. Studies in mice showed tumor growth was markedly suppressed when compared to a control group. (2020-12-08)

Paper-based electrochemical sensor can detect COVID-19 in less than five minutes
A team from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's Grainger College of Engineering has developed a rapid, ultrasensitive test using a paper-based electrochemical sensor that can detect the presence of the virus in less than five minutes. It uses a graphene biosensor and is adaptable to other viruses. (2020-12-07)

Nanomaterials enable dual-mode heating and cooling device
Engineers at Duke University have demonstrated a dual-mode heating and cooling device for building climate control that, if widely deployed in the U.S., could cut HVAC energy use by nearly 20 percent. The invention uses a combination of mechanics and nanomaterials to either harness or expel certain wavelengths of light. Depending on conditions, rollers move a sheet back and forth to expose either heat-trapping materials or cooling materials. (2020-12-02)

No nanoparticle risks found in field tests of spray sunscreens
People can continue using mineral-based aerosol sunscreens without fear of exposure to dangerous levels of nanoparticles or other respirable particulates, according to Penn State research published in the journal Aerosol Science and Engineering. (2020-12-02)

Virus-like probes could help make rapid COVID-19 testing more accurate, reliable
Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed new and improved probes, known as positive controls, that could make it easier to validate rapid, point-of-care diagnostic tests for COVID-19 across the globe. The advance could help expand testing to low-resource, underserved areas. (2020-12-01)

Pumping a nanoparticle to lase at low power
A laser pointer small enough to get inside a cancer cell and stop its 'engine'? The stuff of science fiction? Scientists working at the nanoscale are chipping away at how to build miniature laser devices capable of intracellular bio-imaging and sensing. (2020-12-01)

A shapeshifting material based on inorganic matter
By embedding titanium-based sheets in water, a group led by scientists from the RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science has created a material using inorganic materials that can be converted from a hard gel to soft matter using temperature changes, recreating the strange behavior of sea cucumbers. (2020-11-30)

Mine ponds amplify mercury risks in Peru's Amazon
The proliferation of pits and ponds created in recent years by miners digging for gold in Peru's Amazon has altered the landscape and amplified the risk of mercury poisoning, a new study shows. In some watersheds, there's been a 670% increase in land area covered by abandoned mining pits that have filled in with water. Low-oxygen conditions in these ponds accelerate the conversion of submerged mercury, a leftover from the mining, into highly toxic methylmercury. (2020-11-27)

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