Current Golden Ratio News and Events

Current Golden Ratio News and Events, Golden Ratio News Articles.
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Controlling deflection in construction beams
In civil engineering, flexural beams are used to control the effect of vibrations that can cause cracks to appear in surfaces (concrete slabs) and beams. This is particularly important in buildings that require high tensile strength and where the use of machinery can cause a lot of vibrations that can disturb structural integrity. (2021-02-22)

RUDN University physicists analyzed the role of gravity in elementary particles formation
Gravity might play a bigger role in the formation of elementary particles than scientists used to believe. A team of physicists from RUDN University obtained some solutions of semi-classical models that describe particle-like waves. They also calculated the ratio between the gravitational interaction of particles and the interaction of their charges. (2021-02-17)

Bacteria and algae get rides in clouds
Human health and ecosystems could be affected by microbes including cyanobacteria and algae that hitch rides in clouds and enter soil, lakes, oceans and other environments when it rains, according to a Rutgers co-authored study. (2021-02-16)

Small mammals climb higher to flee warming temperatures in the Rockies
The golden-mantled ground squirrel is one of the most photographed animals in the Rocky Mountains. It's also joining many other species of rodents and shrews in Colorado that are making an ominous trek: They're climbing uphill to escape from climate change. (2021-02-11)

How messenger substances influence individual decision-making
A research team of psychologists and physicists from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) and Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg investigated the neurobiological processes in various forms of decision-making. They report in the journal Nature Communications that a different ratio of two messenger substances affects short-term and long-term strategic decisions differently. (2021-02-10)

Physicists have optimized the method of smelting the MAX phase
Physicists from the Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University in collaboration with their foreign colleagues have optimized the method for obtaining highly pure Cr2AlC MAX-phase, which is necessary for studying the magnetic properties of this compound when it is doped with manganese. The unique properties of magnetic MAX materials could be used in a wide range of new technologies from magnetic cooling to spintronics. (2021-02-10)

Children's finger length points to mothers' income level
Low-income mothers feminize their children in the womb by adjusting their hormones, whereas high-income mothers masculinize their children, a major study based on finger length, led by a Swansea University expert, has found. The phenomenon is an unconscious evolutionary response aimed at boosting their offspring's chances of successful reproduction. It helps, in part, explain associations between low income, low levels of testosterone before birth, and major causes of mortality such as cardiovascular disease. (2021-02-09)

The Ramanujan Machine
The study, which was published in the journal Nature, was carried out by undergraduates from different faculties under the tutelage of Assistant Professor Ido Kaminer of the Andrew and Erna Viterbi Faculty of Electrical Engineering at the Technion. (2021-02-05)

How elephants evolved to become big and cancer-resistant
In this new study, 'We explored how elephants and their living and extinct relatives evolved to be cancer-resistant,' says University at Buffalo biologist Vincent Lynch. He adds, regarding the findings, 'Elephants have lots and lots and lots of extra copies of tumor suppressor genes, and they all contribute probably a little bit to cancer resistance.' (2021-02-04)

Fine tuned: adjusting the composition and properties of semiconducting 2D alloys
Semiconducting 2D alloys could be key to overcoming the technical limitations of modern electronics. Although 2D Si-Ge alloys would have interesting properties for this purpose, they were only predicted theoretically. Now, scientists from Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have realized the first experimental demonstration. They have also shown that the Si to Ge ratio can be adjusted to fine tune the electronic properties of the alloys, paving the way for novel applications. (2021-02-02)

Ecologists conducted a novel study on vegetation transpiration from a global network of 251 sites
An ecologist from RUDN University together with colleagues from 14 countries compared three methods for estimating ecosystem transpiration in a study. In the first ever research with such a comprehensive data-set, the team used land-atmosphere water vapor flux data of collected at 251 locations all over the planet, from Australia to Greenland. The outcome of the research help to understand the role of plants in the global water and carbon cycles in the current predicament of global warming. (2021-01-28)

Scientists show impact of human activity on bird species
Scientists have shown where bird species would exist in the absence of human activity under research that could provide a new approach to setting conservation priorities. (2021-01-25)

How does incident solar radiation affect urban canyons?
Toyohashi University of Technology proposed a numerical bead model to predict the upward-to-downward reflection ratio of glass bead retro-reflective (RR) material purposed for urban heat island (UHI) mitigation and reducing energy consumption. These results will contribute to existing research on the absorption or reflection of solar radiation to improve urban thermal and lighting conditions, and to reduce building energy consumption. (2021-01-25)

Predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1266, Zhuzhi Wen, Jingying Hou, Zun Mai, Huifen Huang, Yangxin Chen, Dengfeng Geng and Jingfeng Wang from Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China and Guandong Province Key Laboratory of Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, Guangzhou, China consider predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope. (2021-01-22)

A massive advance in spectrometry
Kanazawa University scientists use computer simulations of charged molecules to help improve the accuracy of mass spectrometers. By understanding the collisions between ions that reduce excess charges, this work may lead to more sensitive radiocarbon dating and medical testing. (2021-01-18)

Bees respond to wildfire aftermath by producing more female offspring
Researchers have found that the blue orchard bee, an important native pollinator, produces female offspring at higher rates in the aftermath of wildfire in forests. (2021-01-14)

Unexplained 7-fold variation in euthanasia rates across the Netherlands
There's a 7-fold unexplained variation in rates of euthanasia across The Netherlands, reveals an analysis of health insurance claims data, published online in the journal BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care. (2021-01-14)

COVID-19 pandemic had big impact on commercial fishing in Northeast
With restaurants and supply chains disrupted due to the global coronavirus pandemic, two-fifths of commercial fishermen surveyed from Maine through North Carolina did not go fishing earlier this year, according to a Rutgers study that also documented their resilience and adaptation. Of those who kept fishing, nearly all reported a decline in income compared with previous years, according to the survey of 258 fishers in the Northeast published in the journal PLOS ONE. (2020-12-17)

Scientists precisely predict intricate evolutions of multiple-period patterns in bilayers
Surface instability of compliant film/substrate bilayers has raised considerable interests due to its broad applications, yet it is still a challenge to precisely predict and continuously trace secondary bifurcation transitions in the nonlinear post-buckling region. Now researchers at Fudan University develop lattice models to precisely capture the nonlinear morphology evolution with multiple mode transitions that occur in film/substrate systems. (2020-12-15)

Caribbean coral reefs under siege from aggressive algae
Human activity endangers coral health around the world. A new algal threat is taking advantage of coral's already precarious situation in the Caribbean and making it even harder for reef ecosystems to grow. Just-published research details how an aggressive, golden-brown, crust-like alga is rapidly overgrowing shallow reefs, taking the place of coral that was damaged by extreme storms and exacerbating the damage caused by ocean acidification, disease, pollution, and bleaching. (2020-11-30)

Emergency imaging trends in pediatric vs. adult patients for abdominal pain
According to AJR, although pediatric CT use has decreased for the evaluation of abdominal pain (perhaps due to implementing an ultrasound-first strategy for suspected appendicitis), CT use has continued to increase among adults with abdominal pain in U.S. emergency department (ED) visits. Although trends in CT use have previously been reported for children and adults, this study is the first to contrast the two cohorts in the ED setting in a nationally representative sample. (2020-11-20)

Three reasons why COVID-19 can cause silent hypoxia
To crack the mystery of what causes silent hypoxia, a condition when oxygen levels in the body are abnormally low, BU biomedical engineers used computer modeling to test out three different scenarios that help explain how and why the lungs stop providing oxygen to the bloodstream. (2020-11-19)

Risk of target organ damage in patients with masked hypertension versus sustained hypertension
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1261, Yue Wu, Guoyue Zhang, Rong Hu and Jianlin Du from The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China consider the risk of target organ damage in patients with masked hypertension versus sustained hypertension. (2020-11-19)

Smaller than ever--exploring the unusual properties of quantum-sized materials
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) synthesize sub-nanometer particles with precisely controlled proportions of indium and tin using specific macromolecular templates called dendrimers. Through a screening process spanning different metallic ratios, they discovered unusual electronic states and optical properties originating from size-miniaturization and elemental-hybridization. Their approach could be a first step in the development of sub-nanoparticles with unique functionalities and characteristics for electronic, magnetic, and catalytic applications. (2020-11-12)

Decrease in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions due to COVID-19 detected by atmospheric observations
Atmospheric observations at Hateruma Island, Japan, successfully detected the decrease in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions in China associated with the COVID-19 outbreak. The weather in Hateruma island is frequently influenced by the northwest monsoon travelling over China, which carries the emission signals of air pollutants. The observed ratios of CO2 and CH4 variabilities showed a significant decrease during February-March 2020, corresponding to about a 30% decrease in China's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions, according to a chemistry-transport model simulation. (2020-11-06)

UM research essential to global arctic animal migration archive
Now, scientists can track the movements of thousands of Arctic and sub-Arctic animals over three decades with the new global Arctic Animal Movement Archive. (2020-11-06)

Ecological "big-data" reveals insights into a changing arctic
The Arctic Animal Movement Archive (AAMA) - a new ecological dataset, which combines three decades of animal tracking studies from across the Arctic - provides a powerful new ecological tool to understand the rapidly changing region better. (2020-11-05)

New database shows Arctic animals' changing behavior in face of climate change
Three decades of data on animal migration and movements in the Arctic, tracked through a massive database developed by environmental engineers, shows that animals in one of Earth's coldest regions are shifting their behaviors because of climate change. (2020-11-05)

Archive of animal migration in the Arctic
A global archive with movement data collected across three decades logs changes in the behaviour of Arctic animals (2020-11-05)

Dynamic photonic barcodes record energy transfer at the biointerface
Chen's group recently developed bioresponsive dynamic barcodes, introducing the concept of resonance energy transfer at the interface of the microcavity. (2020-10-30)

Gut hormone blocks brain cell formation and is linked to Parkinson's dementia
A gut hormone, ghrelin, is a key regulator of new nerve cells in the adult brain, a Swansea-led research team has discovered. It could help pave the way for new drugs to treat dementia in patients with Parkinson's Disease. (2020-10-21)

Serum creatinine-to- cystatin C ratio predicts mortality
In patients initiating continuous renal replacement therapy for acute kidney injury, higher serum creatinine-to-cystatin C ratios were associated with lower mortality. (2020-10-21)

A new way of looking at the Earth's interior
Current understanding is that the chemical composition of the Earth's mantle is relatively homogeneous. But experiments conducted by ETH researchers now show that this view is too simplistic. Their results solve a key problem facing the geosciences - and raise some new questions. (2020-10-21)

Are climate scientists being too cautious when linking extreme weather to climate change?
Climate science has focused on avoiding false alarms when linking extreme events to climate change. But it could learn from how weather forecasters warn the public of hazardous events to include a second key metric: the probability of detection. (2020-10-16)

New blood test predicts which COVID-19 patients will develop severe infection
Scientists have developed, for the first time, a score that can accurately predict which patients will develop a severe form of Covid-19. (2020-10-14)

Mapping out rest stops for migrating birds
A team of researchers have developed a new metric called the stopover-to-passage ratio that can help determine if a majority of birds are flying over a particular site or stopping at the site to refuel or rest. The answer to this question can have important implications for what action is ultimately taken on the ground to help migratory birds. (2020-10-14)

Magnitude comparison distinguishes small earthquakes from explosions in US west
By comparing two magnitude measurements for seismic events recorded locally, researchers can tell whether the event was a small earthquake or a single-fire buried chemical explosion. (2020-10-13)

Diamond-studded silk wound dressing detects infection and improves healing
Scientists have developed a next generation wound dressing that can detect infection and improve healing in burns, skin grafts and chronic wounds. (2020-10-13)

More evidence of benefits of REGN-COV2 antibody cocktail to both protect from and treat disease
In June, two studies in Science reported an antibody cocktail against SARS-CoV-2 developed from studies in humanized mice and recovering patients. (2020-10-09)

Exploring the golden hour: Delays in trauma treatment linked to disability and death
Some clinicians consider that after a traumatic injury, patients are most likely to survive if they receive medical treatment within one hour--the so-called 'golden hour.' A new study led by Chiang Wen-Chu at National Taiwan University Hospital, Yunlin Branch, and published October 6th, 2020 in PLOS Medicine, explores that idea, finding that longer delays in treatment could increase a patient's risk of disability or death. (2020-10-06)

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