Current Gorillas News and Events

Current Gorillas News and Events, Gorillas News Articles.
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'Sex, lasers and male competition:' fruit flies win genetic race with rivals
Male fruit flies with the most impressive sexual ornamentation also have super sperm that can outcompete that of rivals in the post-mating fertilization game. (2021-02-12)

Scientists find Ebola virus antibodies in people before 2018 DRC outbreak
Scientists found antibodies to Ebola virus in people up to a year before the 2018 Ebola virus disease outbreak began in the Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, or DRC. This suggests that either early cases may have been missed or that exposure occurs more commonly than previously thought, according to a study led by the University of California, Davis. (2020-11-04)

Violent encounters between gorillas slow population growth rate
A new study by the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund and UC Davis used five decades of data to show how social behavior explains fluctuations in the growth rate of a subpopulation of mountain gorillas. The researchers found that as gorilla group density increases, violent encounters between groups occur more frequently. As a result, infant mortality has increased dramatically, causing the population growth to slow down significantly in recent years. (2020-11-04)

Mountain gorillas are good neighbours - up to a point
Mountain gorilla groups are friendly to familiar neighbours - provided they stay out of ''core'' parts of their territory - new research shows. (2020-10-28)

Molecular mechanism of cross-species transmission of primate lentiviruses
A research group at The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo (IMSUT) showed that gorilla APOBEC3G potentially plays a role in inhibiting SIVcpz replication. Intriguingly, the research group demonstrated that an amino acid substitution in SIVcpz Vif, M16E, is sufficient to overcome gorilla APOBEC3G-mediated restriction. (2020-10-07)

Primate brain size does not predict their intelligence
A research team from the German Primate Center has systematically investigated the cognitive abilities of lemurs, which have relatively small brains compared to other primates. Conducting systematic tests with identical methods revealed that cognitive abilities of lemurs hardly differ from those of monkeys and great apes. Instead, this study revealed that the relationship between brain size and cognitive abilities cannot be generalized and it provides new insights into the evolution of primates. (2020-09-25)

Jellyfish with your chips?
Jellyfish could replace fish and chips on a new sustainable takeaway menu to help keep threatened species off the plate. University of Queensland researchers found 92 endangered and 11 critically endangered species of seafood were caught in oceans around the world after analysing global industrial fishing records. (2020-09-21)

Protected areas can 'double' imperilled species populations
A University of Queensland-led research team has revealed that many endangered mammal species are dependent on protected areas, and would likely vanish without them. Professor James Watson, of UQ and the Wildlife Conservation Society, said despite the success of protected areas, their popularity as a go-to conservation tool has started to wane. (2020-09-06)

Following African elephant trails to approach conservation differently
Elephant trails may lead the way to better conservation approaches. 'Think of elephants as engineers of the forests. Elephants shape the landscape in many ways that benefit humans. We're talking thousands of miles of trails. If we think about the loss of elephants over time, then we will see the forest structure change and human activities also would shift.' (2020-08-31)

Emerging infectious disease and challenges of social distancing in human and non-human animals
Humans are not the only social animal struggling with new infectious diseases. This review examines the behavioral responses to emerging diseases across the animal kingdom from frogs and wolves to lobsters, bats, and humans. The paper also addresses whether or not technology helps when it comes to dealing with humans and social distancing. (2020-08-12)

Gorilla relationships limited in large groups
Mountain gorillas that live in oversized groups may have to limit the number of strong social relationships they form, new research suggests. (2020-07-28)

Big brains and dexterous hands
Primates with large brains can master more complex hand movements than those with smaller brains. However, fine motor skills such as using tools can take time to learn, and humans take the longest of all. Large-brained species such as humans and great apes do not actually learn more slowly than other primates but instead start later, researchers at the University of Zurich have shown. (2020-07-24)

Dolphins learn in similar ways to great apes
Dolphins learn new foraging techniques not just from their mothers, but also from their peers, a study by the University of Zurich has found. More than 1,000 bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Western Australia were observed over 10 years and found to have cultural behavior that is similar to great apes. (2020-06-25)

Digitize your dog into a computer game
Researchers from CAMERA at the University of Bath have developed motion capture technology that enables you to digitise your dog without a motion capture suit and using only one camera. (2020-06-16)

The genome of chimpanzees and gorillas could help to better understand human tumors
A new study by researchers from the Institute of Evolutionary Biology (IBE), a joint center of UPF and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), shows that, surprisingly, the distribution of mutations in human tumors is more similar to that of chimpanzees and gorillas than that of humans. (2020-05-21)

Lifestyle trumps geography in determining makeup of gut microbiome
Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis studied the gut microbiomes of wild apes in the Republic of Congo, of captive apes in zoos in the US, and of people from around the world and discovered that lifestyle is more important than geography or even species in determining the makeup of the gut microbiome. (2020-04-06)

Research identifies regular climbing behavior in a human ancestor
A new study led by the University of Kent has found evidence that human ancestors as recent as two million years ago may have regularly climbed trees. (2020-03-30)

Among wild mammals too, females live longer
In all human populations, average lifespans are longer for women than for men. But what about for other mammals, in the wild? A team led by Jean-François Lemaître, a CNRS, compiled demographic data for 134 populations of 101 mammalian species -- from bats to lions, orcas to gorillas -- making their study the widest reaching and most precise to date. (2020-03-23)

Study finds gorillas display territorial behavior
Scientists have discovered that gorillas really are territorial -- and their behavior is very similar to our own. (2020-03-12)

Zoology: Western gorillas may be territorial
Groups of western gorillas may defend the centres of their home ranges against neighbouring groups, a study in Scientific Reports suggests. These findings may suggest that western gorillas are territorial. (2020-03-12)

These feet were made for walking
Many of us take our feet for granted, but they have a challenging job in the biomechanics department. When we push off with the ball of the foot, the force we apply exceeds our body weight, causing the middle of the foot to bend. Yet the foot maintains its shape because it is stiff enough to withstand this force. A new Nature study has shown the importance of a little-studied structure called the transverse arch. (2020-02-26)

Researchers were not right about left brains
The left and right side of the brain are involved in different tasks. This functional lateralization and associated brain asymmetry are well documented in humans. Scientists now challenge the long-held notion that the human pattern of brain asymmetry is unique. They found the same asymmetry pattern in chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans. However, humans were the most variable in this pattern. This suggests that lateralized, uniquely human cognitive abilities evolved by adapting a presumably ancestral asymmetry pattern. (2020-02-14)

Tourists pose continued risks for disease transmission to endangered mountain gorillas
Researchers at Ohio University have published a new study in collaboration with Ugandan scientists, cautioning that humans place endangered mountain gorillas at risk of disease transmission during tourism encounters. (2020-02-13)

Zoo animal research skewed towards 'popular' species
Research on zoo animals focuses more on 'familiar' species like gorillas and chimpanzees than less well known ones like the waxy monkey frog, scientists say. (2019-10-31)

Differences in human and non-human primate saliva may be caused by diet
Humans are known to be genetically similar to our primate relatives. But major differences can be found in our saliva, according to new research by scientists at the Forsyth Institute and the University of Buffalo. (2019-10-31)

Detection dogs and DNA on the trail of endangered lizards
Detection dogs trained to sniff out the scat of an endangered lizard in California's San Joaquin Valley, combined with genetic species identification, could represent a new noninvasive sampling technique for lizard conservation worldwide. (2019-10-30)

Leipzig primate researchers initiate global collaboration
In order to investigate evolutionary questions, scientists require the largest and most versatile samples possible. If those samples are not available in one place, research institutions can support each other. This is the rationale behind ManyPrimates, a project that aims to establish a culture of global collaboration in primate cognition research. It was set up by researchers from the Leipzig Research Center for Early Childhood Development (LFE) at Leipzig University, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, and Zoo Leipzig. (2019-10-29)

A secret in saliva: Food and germs helped humans evolve into unique member of great apes
University at Buffalo researchers discovered that the human diet -- a result of increased meat consumption, cooking and agriculture -- has led to stark differences in the saliva of humans compared to that of other primates. (2019-10-16)

Resurrection of 50,000-year-old gene reveals how malaria jumped from gorillas to humans
For the first time, scientists have uncovered the likely series of events that led to the world's deadliest malaria parasite being able to jump from gorillas to humans. Researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the University of Montpellier reconstructed an approximately 50,000-year-old gene sequence that was acquired by the ancestor of Plasmodium falciparum, giving it the ability to infect human red blood cells. (2019-10-15)

Taking evolution to heart
An international research group at UBC, Harvard University and Cardiff Metropolitan University has discovered how the human heart has adapted to support endurance physical activities. This research examines how the human heart has evolved and how it adapts in response to different physical challenges, and will bring new ammunition to the international effort to reduce hypertensive heart disease--one of the most common causes of illness and death in the developed world. (2019-09-16)

Female gorillas detect and avoid sick groups
Gorillas are social animals, living in groups that females will migrate to join, becoming members of harems. Though some factors motivating these migrations were previously known, a research team has just demonstrated that female gorillas are able to avoid conspecifics liable to transmit yaws, which leads to conspicuous ulcers on the animals' faces. (2019-09-11)

NUS study reveals similarities in human, chimpanzee, and bonobo eye colour patterns
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have revealed that chimpanzees and bonobos share the contrasting colour pattern seen in human eyes, which makes it easy for them to detect the direction of someone's gaze from a distance. (2019-09-04)

First human ancestors breastfed for longer than contemporary relatives
By analyzing the fossilized teeth of some of our most ancient ancestors, a team of scientists led by the universities of Bristol (UK) and Lyon (France) have discovered that the first humans significantly breastfed their infants for longer periods than their contemporary relatives. (2019-08-29)

Unexpected nut eating by gorillas
Scientists from the Max Planck institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and Washington University in St. Louis have observed a population of western lowland gorillas in Loango National Park, Gabon using their teeth to crack open the woody shells of Coula edulis nuts. The researchers combined direct feeding observations and mechanical tests of seed casings to show that gorillas may be taxing their teeth to their upper limits, year after year, to access this energy rich food source. (2019-08-02)

Study documents impacts of selective logging on Congo's intact forest landscapes
A new study says that the tropical forests of Western Equatorial Africa (WEA) -- which include significant stands of Intact Forest Landscapes (IFLs) -- are increasingly coming under pressure from logging, poaching, and associated disturbances. (2019-07-15)

Gorillas found to live in 'complex' societies, suggesting deep roots of human social evolution
Algorithms reveal 'social tiers' in gorillas seen in only a few other species, such as dolphins and humans. Researchers suggest that some of these social bonds may be analogous to 'old friendships' and 'tribes' in humans. They argue that 'collaborative foraging' may be an evolutionary driver for gorilla societies -- and consequently our own. (2019-07-09)

Understanding what makes captive gorilla hearts tick
We've known for some time that heart disease is prevalent in captive gorilla populations and is a leading cause of death. This is why, in 2010, the Great Ape Heart Project based at Zoo Atlanta (www.greatapeheartproject.org) was formed. The project provides a network of clinical, pathologic and research strategies to aid in the understanding and treating of cardiac disease in all the ape species. (2019-06-26)

Roads and deforestation explode in the Congo basin
Logging roads are expanding dramatically in the Congo Basin, leading to catastrophic collapses in animal populations living in the world's second-largest rainforest, according to research co-led by a scientist at James Cook University in Australia. (2019-06-24)

Human ancestors were 'grounded,' new analysis shows
African apes adapted to living on the ground, a finding that indicates human evolved from an ancestor not limited to tree or other elevated habitats. The analysis adds a new chapter to evolution, shedding additional light on what preceded human bipedalism. (2019-04-30)

Gorillas gather around and groom their dead
It is now known that many animals exhibit unique behaviors around same-species corpses, ranging from removal of the bodies and burial among social insects to quiet attendance and caregiving among elephants and primates. Researchers in Rwanda and Democratic Republic of Congo have been able to take a close look at the behavioral responses to the deaths of three individuals -- both known and unknown -- in gorillas and have reported their findings in PeerJ -- the Journal of Life and Environmental Sciences. (2019-04-03)

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