Current Gps News and Events

Current Gps News and Events, Gps News Articles.
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Slow motion precursors give earthquakes the fast slip
At a glacier near the South Pole, earth scientists have found evidence of a quiet, slow-motion fault slip that triggers strong, fast-slip earthquakes many miles away, according to Cornell University research published in Science Advances. (2021-02-16)

Routine blood tests could be key to stopping the silent killer of liver disease
New research has shown that results of blood tests routinely performed by GPs everywhere contain a hidden fingerprint that can identify people silently developing potentially fatal liver cirrhosis. The researchers have developed an algorithm to detect this fingerprint that could be freely installed on any clinical computer, making this a low-cost way for GPs to carry out large scale screening using patient data they already hold. (2021-02-11)

Bats on the rise
Bats carried aloft to almost 2,000 metres by air currents (2021-02-09)

Well-built muscles underlie athletic performance in birds
Muscle structure and body size predict the athletic performance of Olympic athletes, such as sprinters. The same, it appears, is true of wild seabirds that can commute hundreds of kilometres a day to find food, according to a recent paper by scientists from McGill and Colgate universities published in the Journal of Experimental Biology. (2021-01-19)

How to keep drones flying when a motor fails
Robotics researchers at the University of Zurich show how onboard cameras can be used to keep damaged quadcopters in the air and flying stably -- even without GPS. (2021-01-13)

Breaking through the resolution barrier with quantum-limited precision
Researchers at Paderborn University have developed a new method of distance measurement for systems such as GPS, which achieves more precise results than ever before. Using quantum physics, the team led by Leibniz Prize winner Professor Christine Silberhorn has successfully overcome the so-called resolution limit. (2021-01-05)

Archaeologists from Kuzbass created a 3D model of a part of the Tepsei archaeological site
The scientists worked in cooperation with specialists from the RSSDA laboratory (Moscow). Together, they completed a 3D virtual model of one of the clusters. (2020-12-24)

Doctors should change the way that they ask patients about self-harm and suicide
Doctors can better help patients with mental health concerns by adopting a different questioning style around self-harm and suicide, experts have said. (2020-12-21)

Scientists discover a new type of brain cell that could help detect distance
A new kind of brain cell has been discovered which will help to understand how we remember where we left objects, such as car keys and mobile phones. (2020-12-21)

Deep, slow-slip action may direct largest earthquakes and their tsunamis
Megathrust earthquakes and subsequent tsunamis that originate in subduction zones like Cascadia -- Vancouver Island, Canada, to northern California -- are some of the most severe natural disasters in the world. Now a team of geoscientists thinks the key to understanding some of these destructive events may lie in the deep, gradual slow-slip behaviors beneath the subduction zones. This information might help in planning for future earthquakes in the area. (2020-12-21)

Patients don't receive recommended follow-up care after weight loss surgery
New research shows that patients don't receive the recommended follow-up care from their GPs after weight loss surgery - potentially leading to serious health consequences. (2020-12-16)

Frequency data for stable power supply
In the renewable energies era, grid frequency will be an increasingly important indicator of stability of power supply. Under the direction of the Helmholtz Association, an interdisciplinary research consortium has analyzed frequency fluctuations in twelve synchronous grid areas on three continents. For data recording, scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed a portable, GPS-synchronized recorder based on a new measurement technology. First results have now been published in Nature Communications. (DOI: 10.1038/s41467-020-19732-7) (2020-12-14)

How commercial vessels could become tsunami early-warning systems
If a tsunami formed along the Cascadia Subduction Zone off the coast of Oregon, residents might have just 20-30 minutes to get to safety. Scientists have proposed a new forecasting system that could provide seaside towns with critical early warnings. (2020-12-10)

Hotspots of cheetah activity is a key to solving the cheetah-farmer conflict in Namibia
New insights into the cheetah's spatial behaviour provide a viable solution to the human-wildlife conflict: In the core areas of male cheetah territories, all local males and females frequently meet to exchange information. Moving their breeding herds out of these hotspots, farmers reduced livestock losses by more than 80 percent. These insights are the result of a close cooperation between scientists from Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) and farmers in central Namibia. (2020-12-07)

Mobility behavior may be the key to predicting, promoting individual well-being
DSI postdoctoral fellow Sandrine Müller uses smartphone sensor data to study human behavior. (2020-11-16)

East African Rift System is slowly breaking away, with Madagascar splitting into pieces
''The rate of present-day break-up is millimeters per year, so it will be millions of years before new oceans start to form,'' said Stamps, an assistant professor in the Virginia Tech College of Science.  (2020-11-13)

New maps document big-game migrations across the western United States
For the first time, state and federal wildlife biologists have come together to map the migrations of ungulates across America's West. The maps will help land managers and conservationists pinpoint actions necessary to keep migration routes open and functional to sustain healthy big-game populations. (2020-11-12)

Dark matter from the depths of the universe
Cataclysmic astrophysical events such as black hole mergers could release energy in unexpected forms. Exotic low-mass fields (ELFs), for example, could propagate through space and cause feeble signals detectable with quantum sensor networks such as the atomic clocks of the GPS network or the magnetometers of the GNOME network. These results are particularly interesting in the context of the search for dark matter, as low-mass fields are regarded as promising candidates for this exotic form of matter. (2020-11-11)

Using light to reprogramme the brain's GPS
Neuroscientists at UCL have used laser beams to ''switch on'' neurons in mice, providing new insight into the hidden workings of memory and showing how memories underpin the brain's inner GPS system. (2020-11-06)

An underwater navigation system powered by sound
Underwater backscatter localization developed at MIT could allow for battery-free ocean exploration. The system is akin to subsea GPS and has potential applications in marine conservation, aquaculture, underwater robotics, and more. (2020-11-02)

Birdwatching from afar: amazing new AI-enabled camera system to target specific behaviors
Osaka University researchers have developed an innovative animal-borne data-collection system assisted by artificial intelligence to track previously unobserved behaviors in wild animals. The method uses low-cost sensors to automatically detect and record behaviors of specific interest. The new system greatly outperformed previous random sampling methods in capturing the target behavior and the researchers were able to observe previously unreported foraging behaviors in gulls. These findings can be applied to support further data collection in the wild. (2020-11-02)

Professional view of vitamin D jeopardizing elderly care home residents' health
The professional perception of vitamin D as a medicine, rather than as a key nutrient, is constraining practice and jeopardising the health of elderly care home residents in England, conclude researchers in the journal BMJ Nutrition Prevention & Health. (2020-10-12)

Women more likely to embrace behaviors aimed at preventing the spread of COVID-19
Women are more likely than are men to follow guidelines outlined by medical experts to prevent the spread of COVID-19, new research finds. (2020-10-05)

Tracking sea turtle egg traffickers with GPS-enabled decoy eggs
By placing 3D-printed and GPS-enabled decoy sea turtle eggs into nests on the beach, it's possible to gather key evidence needed to expose rampant illegal trade of the eggs, suggests a study publishing in the journal Current Biology on October 5, 2020. The researchers specifically tested how well the decoy eggs work and their safety for the endangered turtles. (2020-10-05)

Flood risks: More accurate data due to COVID-19
Emerging use of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) makes it possible to continuously measure shallow changes in elevation of Earth surface. A study by the University of Bonn now shows that the quality of these measurements may have improved significantly during the pandemic, at least at some stations. The results show which factors should be considered in the future when installing GPS antennas. (2020-09-23)

Paying GPs to provide contraception information linked to reduced abortions
Providing general practitioners (GPs) with financial incentives to offer information about long-acting contraceptives, such as the hormonal implant, is associated with an increase in their use, and a fall in the number of abortions . (2020-09-14)

More than half of "sudden" cardiac arrest victims had contacted health services before
Today scientists report that 58% of ''sudden'' cardiac arrest sufferers sought medical help during the two weeks before the event. The research is presented today at ESC Congress 2020. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is the third leading cause of death worldwide. Cardiac arrest is lethal within minutes if left untreated and it is estimated that, on average, less than 10% of victims survive. (2020-08-25)

Electronic alert reduces excessive prescribing of short-acting asthma relievers
An automatic, electronic alert on general practitioners' computer screens can help to prevent excessive prescribing of short-acting asthma reliever medication, according to research to be presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress (2020-08-23)

First ever observation of 'time crystals' interacting
For the first time ever, scientists have witnessed the interaction of a new phase of matter known as 'time crystals'. The discovery may lead to applications in quantum information processing. First theorised in 2012 by Nobel Laureate Frank Wilczek and identified in 2016, time crystals exhibit the bizarre property of being in constant, repeating motion in time despite no external input. (2020-08-17)

The bouncer in the brain
How do you keep orientation in a complex environment, like the city of Vienna? You can thank your brain's ''global positioning system'' (GPS), the hippocampus, for this sense of orientation. To further understand its functions, scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) analyzed single neurons of this GPS in mice. They discovered that so-called granule cells filter and sharpen spatial information. The researchers recently published their findings in Neuron. (2020-08-06)

Most GP trainees willing to use mindfulness to tackle burnout: new study
Mindfulness could help trainee GPs to build their resilience and reduce burnout, helping to reduce the number of newly qualified GPs leaving the profession, according to University of Warwick researchers. (2020-08-03)

Higher end of normal blood platelet count could indicate cancer
Blood platelet counts at the higher end of normal suggest a high risk of cancer in men aged 60 or over, and should be investigated, according to new University of Exeter research. (2020-07-27)

Primary care physicians during the COVID-19 epidemic
Scientists from the University of Geneva has analysed clinical data from more than 1,500 ambulatory patients tested for COVID-19. Their results point out the great disparity in symptoms between inpatient and outpatient care and the diagnostic difficulties that can result. They highlight the need for greater involvement of primary care physicians in defining and implementing health policies aimed at controlling such an epidemic, as well as the need to strengthen academic research in primary care. (2020-07-22)

New research shows that laser spectral linewidth is classical-physics phenomenon
New ground-breaking research from the University of Surrey could change the way scientists understand and describe lasers - establishing a new relationship between classical and quantum physics. (2020-07-10)

Movement ecology bears fruits: ATLAS supports map-based navigation of wild bats
Hebrew University and Tel Aviv University researchers collaborated on tracking wild bats' foraging habits in their natural habitat. They found evidence that the animals navigate using an advanced cognitive map. (2020-07-09)

Integrating pharmacists into general practice can optimize patient treatment
Research undertaken by RCSI University of Medicine and Health Sciences suggests that integrating pharmacists into general practice (GP) teams facilitates collaboration to optimise treatment plans for patients with long-term medical needs and alleviate pressures on GP practices. (2020-06-29)

Including patients in hospital discharge communication would improve outcomes of care
Sending discharge letters to UK patients as well as their GPs when they leave hospital could make a substantial difference to patient outcomes, according to a new study by University of Warwick researchers. (2020-06-16)

How Dashcams help and hinder forensics
Dashcams are vital for helping police investigate car incidents, however the way the footage is submitted to police, managed and processed can cause problems. A researcher at WMG, University of Warwick has assessed seven different types of dashcams' SD storage systems to see how they help and hinder digital forensics. (2020-06-11)

New study finds surface disturbance can limit mule deer migration
Researchers used 145 migrations from 56 individual deer to examine disturbance effects at various scales. Results consistently showed that mule deer use of migration corridors steeply declined when surface disturbance from roads and well pads surpassed 3%. Mule deer were able to migrate through areas where surface disturbance was lower. (2020-06-10)

New hints of volcanism under the heart of northern Europe
Scientists have discovered new evidence for active volcanism next door to some of the most densely populated areas of Europe. The study 'crowd-sourced' GPS monitoring data from antennae across western Europe to track subtle movements in the Earth's surface, thought to be caused by a rising subsurface mantle plume. The work is published in Geophysical Journal International. (2020-06-09)

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