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Current Gps News and Events, Gps News Articles.
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Why the Victoria Plate in Africa rotates
The East African Rift System is a newly forming plate tectonic boundary at which the African continent is being separated into several plates. According to GPS data, one of those, the Victoria microplate, is moving in a counterclockwise rotation relative to Africa in contrast to the other plates involved. Now, researchers have found evidence that suggests that the configuration of weaker and stronger lithospheric regions controls the rotation of continental microplates and Victoria in particular. (2020-06-08)

Bluetooth technology, the best ally to detect COVID-19 cases through smartphone contact tracing
A study carried out by researchers at the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV) and published in the IEEE Access journal concludes that Bluetooth technology is the best ally to detect possible COVID-19 cases through smartphone contact tracing. The key is the high level of precision, higher than other technologies, such as GPS, cell phone networks and Wi-Fi. (2020-06-08)

Interpreting DTC testing results imposes a major burden on genetics services
A study from Australia finds that because patients are increasingly approaching GPs about the results of direct-to consumer genetic testing, and GPs are ill-equipped to advise them, this is having an impact on already overloaded clinical genetics services. (2020-06-05)

Research tackles hidden 'tablet overload' as COVID isolation fears grow
New research provides a roadmap to help the millions of older Britons struggling with 'shopping lists' of medication, as fears grow that the current coronavirus lockdown could be further isolating the most vulnerable. (2020-06-04)

CNIC researchers discover a system essential for limb formation during embryonic development
Scientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC) have identified a system that tells embryonic cells where they are in a developing organ (2020-06-03)

How to improve the pneumococcus vaccine
Pneumococcus kills 1 million children annually according to the World Health Organization. The key to the pathogen's virulence is its thick sugar capsule, which is also the active ingredient in vaccines. Different strains have different capsules. Researchers just identified a new capsule for the pneumococcus -- the 100th to be found after more than a century of research on the pathogen. (2020-05-19)

Engineers develop low-cost, high-accuracy GPS-like system for flexible medical robots
Roboticists at the University of California San Diego have developed an affordable, easy to use system to track the location of flexible surgical robots inside the human body. The system performs as well as current state of the art methods, but is much less expensive. Many current methods also require exposure to radiation, while this system does not. Their findings are published in the April 2020 issue of IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters. (2020-05-18)

A new high-resolution, 3D map of the whole mouse brain
In a study published in the journal Cell, Allen Institute scientists describe the third iteration of the Allen Mouse Brain Common Coordinate Framework, or CCFv3, a complete, high-resolution 3D atlas of the mouse brain. (2020-05-07)

Training GPs to identify domestic violence leads to dramatic increase in finding victims
A training programme that teaches GPs how to identify domestic violence and abuse (DVA) victims has led to a 30-fold increase in DVA referrals, according to a collaborative study of 205 general practices led by Queen Mary University of London, in partnership with the Centre for Academic Primary Care, Bristol Medical School. (2020-05-06)

Scientists observes changes in Earth's surface movement months before big earthquakes
Months prior to the earthquakes in Chile 2010 and Japan 2011, oscillations of the earth's surface occurred, in extensions of about 1,000 kilometers in each country, after which the decoupling of the tectonic plates was generated, causing both major earthquakes. (2020-05-06)

'Wobble' may precede some great earthquakes, study shows
The land masses of Japan shifted from east to west to east again in the months before the strongest earthquake in the country's recorded history, a 2011 magnitude-9 earthquake that killed more than 15,500 people, new research shows. (2020-04-29)

Early GP referrals are leading to cancer patients surviving longer
Early GP referrals are likely to lead to cancer patients surviving longer, a study by King's College London has found. (2020-04-20)

Quantum entanglement offers unprecedented precision for GPS, imaging and beyond
UA engineers have demonstrated for the first time that it's possible to connect a network of sensors through quantum entanglement. The experiment opens a door to unprecedented levels of sensitivity in GPS navigation, medical imaging and astronomy. (2020-04-17)

Logging threatening endangered caribou
University of Guelph researchers found habitat and food web changes from forestry are encouraging more wolf packs to prey on caribou. Researchers attached video and GPS-tracking radio collars to caribou and wolves to monitor foraging and movements, including signs wolves had killed a caribou. Overs 6 years they collected and compared data from a site with extensive logging and a site untouched by forestry and found caribou in the disturbed site were not self-sustaining. (2020-04-15)

A talk with your GP may prevent cardiovascular disease
Having a general practitioner (GP) who is trained in motivational interviewing may reduce your risk of getting cardiovascular disease. But only if you do not already have diabetes or are at risk of developing it. This is shown by a new randomised study from Aarhus University. (2020-04-14)

Scientists develop 'backpack' computers to track wild animals in hard-to-reach habitats
To truly understand an animal species is to observe its behavior and social networks in the wild. With new technology described today (April 2) in PLOS Biology, researchers are able to track tiny animals that divide their time between flying around in the sky and huddling together in caves and hollow trees -- by attaching little backpacks to them with glue. (2020-04-02)

American robins now migrate 12 days earlier than in 1994
A new study, published in Environmental Research Letters, concludes that robin migration is kicking off earlier by about five days each decade. The study is also the first to reveal the environmental conditions along the migration route that help the birds keep up with the changing seasons. (2020-04-01)

Small, precise and affordable gyroscope for navigating without GPS
A small, inexpensive and highly accurate gyroscope, developed at the University of Michigan, could help drones and autonomous cars stay on track without a GPS signal. (2020-03-23)

6000-8000 km round trip flight of migratory wading birds tracked
Plovers winter and migrate utilizing rice paddy fields along their annual route. Little ringed plovers breeding in Nagano, Japan were tracked along their 6000 to 8000km round trip journey to gather previously unknown data regarding their course and preferred fueling sites. (2020-03-18)

Differences between self-identified general practitioners and board-certified family doctors
Physicians who identify as 'general practitioners' are a group distinct from board-certified 'family physicians,' according to a new study that was supported, in part, by the American Board of Family Medicine Foundation. The authors recommend that GPs and FPs be considered separate groups for research, workforce and policy purposes. (2020-03-09)

Repeat antibiotic prescribing linked to higher risk of hospital admissions
Epidemiologists at the University of Manchester have discovered an association between the number of prescriptions for antibiotics and a higher risk of hospital admissions. (2020-03-01)

Intervention to help GPs identify and treat patients with hepatitis C found to be effective
The first UK clinical trial to increase the identification and treatment of hepatitis C (HCV) patients in primary care has been found to be effective, acceptable to staff and highly cost-effective for the NHS. The University of Bristol-led Hepatitis C Assessment to Treatment Trial (HepCATT), published in the British Medical Journal today, provides robust evidence of effective action GPs should take to increase HCV testing and treatment. (2020-02-26)

Solar storms could scramble whales' navigational sense
When our sun belches out a hot stream of charged particles in Earth's general direction, it doesn't just mess up communications satellites. It might also be scrambling the navigational sense of California gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus), causing them to strand on land, according to a Duke University graduate student. Gray whales were 4.3 times more likely to strand when a lot of radio frequency noise from a solar outburst was hitting the Earth. (2020-02-24)

GP care is valuable for children with life-limiting conditions reducing the need for A+E
Regular involvement of a GP in the care of children and young people with life-limiting conditions can reduce hospital admissions, a new study has found. (2020-02-18)

Shortness of breath and cough increase as first symptom of lung cancer
GPs are being urged to consider shortness of breath and cough as potential predictors of lung cancer, after a study found they were becoming more common as the first symptom in diagnosis. (2020-01-27)

Multimorbidity leads to general practitioners suffering burnout
The risk of general practitioners (GPs) suffering burnout increases with the number of patients with complex medical histories. A new study from the Research Unit for General Practice in Denmark is the first to document a correlation between patients with multimorbidity and increased incidences of burnout among their general practitioners. (2020-01-23)

Study provides insight on how to minimize the impacts of severe weather on wildlife
Data collected are providing crucial new insights for scientists seeking to minimize the impacts of severe weather and climate change on wildlife. (2020-01-23)

Including irregular time intervals improves animal movement studies
Studies of animal movement and behavior--including those addressing disease spread and animal conservation--should monitor animals at both regular and irregular time points to improve understanding of animal movement behavior, according to a new study by Penn State statisticians. The study is the first to provide guidance about sampling regimes for this type of biological research. (2020-01-14)

Asian black bears' smart strategy for seasonal energy balance
A collaboration led by scientists at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Japan, has discovered that daily energy balance of Asian black bears exhibited seasonal change with a twin-peak pattern: up in spring, down to the lowest point in summer, and up again in autumn. From spring to summer, the energy balance is surprisingly negative. Interestingly, bears obtain about 80% of the energy they need in a year by eating acorns in autumn. (2019-12-23)

Berlin's bright sky isn't a bat's thing
People can hardly imagine a city without night-time street lighting. But how do nocturnal animals such as bats respond to the illuminated urban landscape? In a recent study, scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW), together with German and international colleagues, equipped common noctule bats (Nyctalus noctula) with mini GPS transmitters and recorded their trajectories in the sky above Berlin. They show that common noctules avoid brightly lit, built-up areas. (2019-12-20)

Astrophysics and AI may offer key to early dementia diagnosis
Crucial early diagnosis of dementia in general practice could improve thanks to a computer model designed in a collaboration between Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) and astrophysicists at the University of Sussex. (2019-12-17)

Dramatic rise in patients 'cured' of heart condition after GP performance pay scheme
The introduction of a performance-related financial incentive scheme for GPs led to a dramatic almost 5-fold rise in the number of patients whose heart rhythm condition was said to have been 'cured'. (2019-12-05)

25-fold surge in vitamin D supplement prescriptions for kids in UK primary care
The number of vitamin D supplement prescriptions written for children in primary care in the UK has surged 25-fold in under 10 years, reveals an analysis of family doctor (GP) prescribing data, published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2019-12-03)

Prescribing for self, family, and friends widespread among young Irish doctors, poll shows
Prescribing for self, family, friends and colleagues is widespread among young Irish doctors, suggest the results of a survey, published online in the Journal of Medical Ethics. (2019-12-03)

A quarter of cancer patients experience avoidable delay to diagnosis
One in four cancer patients experienced a delay to their diagnosis that could have been avoided, according to a new study by Cancer Research UK. (2019-12-03)

Australian GPs widely offering placebos, new study finds
Most Australian GPs have used a placebo in practice at least once, with active placebos (active treatments used primarily to generate positive expectations) more commonly used than inert placebos, according to a new study from University of Sydney. (2019-12-02)

Structures near airports increase risk of airplane-goose collisions
From mid-November 2015 through February 2016, scientists used GPS transmitters to track the movements of Canada geese near Midway International Airport in Chicago. They discovered that -- in the colder months, at least -- some geese are hanging out on rooftops, in a rail yard and in a canal close to Midway's runways. This behavior increases the danger of collisions between geese and airplanes, the researchers say. (2019-11-21)

Practice characteristics and job satisfaction among GPs in 11 countries
Organizational and functional features of general practitioner practices in 11 countries were studied in search of underlying reasons for job dissatisfaction. (2019-11-12)

GP clinics could help bridge mental health treatment gap, study finds
Patients experiencing mild to moderate mental health issues could be managed effectively by GP practices, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. This could also help reduce the stigma faced by these individuals. However, specialist treatment may still prove more cost-effective in the long term, say the researchers. (2019-11-07)

Blood test can help GPs spot ovarian cancer in women with suspicious symptoms
Testing for levels of CA125 in the blood is a useful tool for gauging the likelihood of ovarian cancer and could help detect other types of cancer among patients in primary care, according to research presented at the 2019 NCRI Cancer Conference. (2019-11-04)

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