Current Grand Canyon News and Events

Current Grand Canyon News and Events, Grand Canyon News Articles.
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Hidden conflict in the mutually beneficial relationship between legumes and rhizobia
The mutually beneficial relationship between legumes and rhizobia is one of the most well-known and agronomically important examples of symbiosis. A study led by Chapman University's Kenjiro Quides tested the boundaries of this relationship -- and found that it's not always as perfectly harmonious as previously thought. Reported in the journal Evolution, the results suggest a hidden conflict in the symbiotic relationship and provides support for the conclusion that rhizobia have an evolutionary advantage. (2021-02-10)

Early study points to potential therapeutic avenue for a pair of rare pediatric diseases
Scientists have devised a new approach for detecting and potentially heading off the effects of two rare pediatric diseases before birth. The study, performed in mouse models of the diseases and published today in Cell Reports, represents an important step toward much-needed early interventions for Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and Silver-Russell syndrome. (2021-02-09)

Methane emissions from coal mines are higher than previously thought
Methane emissions from coal mines are likely higher than previously calculated, because of emissions from abandoned mines and higher content in deep coal seams. (2021-01-29)

Deep-sea plastic accumulations by turbidity currents: NW South China sea
Benthic plastic litter is a main source of pollutants in oceans, but how it disperses is largely unknown. This study by Guangfa Zhong and Xiaotong Peng, published today in Geology, presents novel findings on the distribution patterns and dispersion mechanisms of deep-sea plastic waste in a submarined canyon located in the northwestern South China Sea. (2021-01-26)

Three-site study highlight effectiveness of FEND nasal calcium rich salts
In a paper published in Molecular Frontiers Journal, researchers from Cambridge, Massachusetts and Bangalore, India study the effectiveness of FEND product to significantly improve airway hygiene by reducing and suppressing respiratory droplets potentially containing airborne pathogens and other contaminants. (2021-01-11)

Breaking bad: how shattered chromosomes make cancer cells drug-resistant
UC San Diego and Ludwig Cancer Research scientists describe how a phenomenon known as ''chromothripsis'' breaks up chromosomes, which then reassemble in ways that ultimately promote cancer cell growth. (2020-12-23)

Oregon researchers find that like adults, children by age 3 prefer seeing fractal patterns
By the time children are 3 years old they already have an adult-like preference for visual fractal patterns commonly seen in nature, according to University of Oregon researchers. (2020-12-11)

Rochester researchers uncover key clues about the solar system's history
Researchers have used magnetism to determine, for the first time, when asteroids that are rich in water and amino acids first arrived in the inner solar system. (2020-12-04)

After more than a decade, ChIP-seq may be quantitative after all
For more than a decade, scientists studying epigenetics have used a powerful method called ChIP-seq to map changes in proteins and other critical regulatory factors across the genome. While ChIP-seq provides invaluable insights into the underpinnings of health and disease, it also faces a frustrating challenge: its results are often viewed as qualitative rather than quantitative, making interpretation difficult. But, it turns out, ChIP-seq may have been quantitative all along. (2020-11-20)

Near-atomic 'maps' reveal structure for maintaining pH balance in cells
For the first time, scientists have visualized a new class of molecular gates that maintain pH balance within brain cells, a critical function that keeps cells alive and helps prevent stroke and other brain injuries. These gates, called proton-activated chloride channels (PAC), nest within cell membranes and regulate the passage of small molecules called chloride ions into and out of cells. This allows cells to sense and respond to their environment. (2020-11-04)

The BrainHealth project could create a resilient economy
Scientists at Center for BrainHealth® worked with researchers across the world to develop a science-based plan that could help the economy recover and prevent similar collapses in the future. The Brain Capital Grand Strategy is an economic reimagination wherein organizations invest in employees' brain health as a critical, measurable asset. Improving brain health helps people tap into their brain's limitless potential, catalyze innovative thinking and improve their productivity, in turn strengthening the transforming economy. (2020-10-26)

Light pollution alters predator-prey interactions between cougars and mule deer in western US
A new study provides strong evidence that exposure to light pollution alters predator-prey dynamics between mule deer and cougars across the intermountain West, a rapidly growing region where nighttime skyglow is an increasing environmental disturbance. (2020-10-19)

Early trauma influences metabolism across generations
A study by the Brain Research Institute at UZH reveals that early trauma leads to changes in blood metabolites - similarly in mice and humans. Experiments with mice have show that these potentially harmful effects on health are also passed to the next generation. The researchers have identified a biological mechanism by which traumatic experiences become embedded in germ cells. (2020-10-15)

Spotlight on artificial intelligence: ONR to highlight AI research at DoD Symposium
Leaders from the Office of Naval Research will discuss how the Department of the Navy can best harness the power and potential of artificial intelligence (AI) during two panel sessions at the Department of Defense (DoD) Artificial Intelligence Symposium and Exposition, held Sept. 9-10, 2020. The two-day virtual event is sponsored by the DoD's Joint Artificial Intelligence Center. (2020-09-09)

Native desert bighorn sheep in ecologically intact areas are less vulnerable to climate change
In the American Southwest, native desert bighorn sheep populations found in landscapes with minimal human disturbance, including several national parks, are less likely to be vulnerable to climate change. (2020-08-26)

A watershed moment for US water quality
A new federal rule that determines how the Clean Water Act is implemented leaves millions of miles of streams and acres of wetlands unprotected based on selective interpretation of case law and a distortion of scientific evidence, researchers say in a new publication. (2020-08-13)

NASA's Aqua satellite shows two views of the apple fire
NASA's Aqua satellite took images of the Apple Fire as it continued to spread north across the head of the Mill Creek Canyon, and east into the San Gorgonio Wilderness near San Bernardino, Calif. on Aug. 3, 2020. (2020-08-04)

NASA satellites show two views of California's Apple Fire
NASA's satellites were working overtime as they snapped pictures of the large Apple Fire in Banning Canyon near San Bernardino, California on Aug. 02, 2020. This fire began on July 31, 2020 and the cause of the fire is still under investigation. To date the fire has consumed 20,516 acres and is 5% contained. (2020-08-03)

Researchers describe structure of SARS-CoV-2 proteins suitable for design of new drugs
Group of researchers at IOCB Prague determined and analyzed the precise structure of the Nsp16 and Nsp10 protein complex of the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. They identified several fundamental characteristics, which can be targeted by inhibitors that suppress the activity of the Nsp16 and Nsp10 protein complex and may, in the future, serve as drugs to combat many coronaviruses. (2020-07-30)

China 2050: How the US should prepare for an ascendant China -- RAND Report
New RAND report says US should prepare for a triumphant or ascending People's Republic of China -- scenarios that not only align with current PRC national development trends but also represent the most challenging future scenarios for the US military. (2020-07-24)

Northern California's COVID-19 epidemic resulted from multiple virus strains entering state
Distinct from virus transmission patterns identified elsewhere, analysis of SARS-CoV-2 genomes from a small number of California-based patients suggests the virus arrived in northern California through a complex series of introductions, not only from state to state but also from international travel. (2020-06-08)

Atomic blueprint of 'molecular machine' reveals role in membrane protein installation
Van Andel Institute scientists have revealed the first known atomic structure of a 'molecular machine' responsible for installing critical signaling proteins into cellular membranes. The findings, published today in Nature, shed new light on how this process works, and lay the foundation for potential future therapies for diseases like cancer, Alzheimer's and cystic fibrosis. (2020-06-03)

Near-atomic 'blueprint' reveals inner workings of drug target for cancer, other diseases
Van Andel Institute scientists have for the first time described the near-atomic level structure of a molecular pathway that plays critical roles in human development, blood pressure regulation, inflammation and cell death. The findings were published today in the journal Nature. (2020-06-03)

Collaborative research addresses need for conservation of springs in drying climate
Hydrogeologist Abe Springer contributed results and implications on springs as refugia from his research group's springs ecohydrology research and helped develop a geomorphological-based classification system for springs ecosystems. (2020-06-03)

Researchers study genetic outcomes of translocating bighorn sheep
Bighorn sheep have maintained a distinctive population genetic structure in Wyoming, even with historical population losses and translocations. (2020-06-03)

Releasing molecular 'brake' kick-starts immune cell function
The immune system's ability to marshal specialized cells to fight off infection relies in part on tiny molecules called microRNAs, which act as a release for the 'brakes' that keep cells dormant until needed, according to a new study published in the journal Cell Reports. (2020-05-18)

Food webs determine the fate of mercury pollution in the Colorado River, Grand Canyon
In the Grand Canyon reach of the Colorado River, two species play an outsized role in the fate of mercury in the aquatic ecosystem, and their numbers are altered by flood events. (2020-05-15)

Variance in tree species results in the cleanest urban air
What kind of an effect do trees have on aerosol particle concentrations in cities? Modelling carried out at the University of Helsinki revealed that the air was cleanest on the street level with three rows of trees of variable height situated along boulevard-type city street canyons. (2020-05-07)

The great unconformity
The geologic record is exactly that: a record. The strata of rock tell scientists about past environments, much like pages in an encyclopedia. Except this reference book has more pages missing than it has remaining. So geologists are tasked not only with understanding what is there, but also with figuring out what's not, and where it went. (2020-05-07)

Catastrophic outburst floods carved Greenland's 'Grand Canyon'
Buried a mile beneath Greenland's thick ice sheet is a network of canyons so deep and long that the largest of these has been called Greenland's 'Grand Canyon.' This megacanyon's shape suggests it was carved by running water prior to widespread glaciation, but exactly when and how the island's grandest canyon formed are topics of intense debate. (2020-04-30)

How catastrophic outburst floods may have carved Greenland's 'grand canyon'
For years, geologists have debated how and when canyons under the Greenland Ice Sheet formed, especially one called 'Greenland's Grand Canyon.' Its shape suggests it was carved by running water and glaciers, but until now its genesis remained unknown, scientists at UMass Amherst and Denmark's Center for Ice and Climate say. (2020-04-30)

What makes Saturn's atmosphere so hot
New analysis of data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft found that electric currents, triggered by interactions between solar winds and charged particles from Saturn's moons, spark the auroras and heat the planet's upper atmosphere. (2020-04-06)

New framework will help decide which trees are best in the fight against air pollution
A study from the University of Surrey has provided a comprehensive guide on which tree species are best for combating air pollution that originates from our roads -- along with suggestions for how to plant these green barriers to get the best results. (2020-03-26)

Wildfire perceptions largely positive after hiking in a burned landscape
Results from pre- and post-hike surveys of a burned landscape indicate that people understand and appreciate the role of fire in natural landscapes more than is perceived. (2020-03-26)

The life and death of one of America's most mysterious trees
A symbol of life, ancient sundial or just firewood? Tree-ring scientists trace the origin of a tree log unearthed almost a century ago. (2020-03-17)

New prize-winning research highlights potential of immune intervention in improving regenerative medicine
Joana Neves is the 2019 grand prize winner of the Sartorius & Science Prize for Regenerating Medicine & Cell Therapy, for work in mice that offers a promising approach to improve the outcome of regenerative stem cell-based therapies aimed at delaying age-related degenerative diseases. (2020-03-12)

App detecting jaundice may prevent deaths in newborns
A smartphone app that allows users to check for jaundice in newborn babies simply by taking a picture of the eye may be an effective, low-cost way to screen for the condition, according to a pilot study led by UCL and UCLH. The study found that a new screening method quantifying the yellowness of the eye can be as effective at detecting more severe jaundice as costly screening devices recommended for use in the UK. (2020-03-02)

Deep-sea coral gardens discovered in the submarine canyons off south Western Australia
Stunning 'gardens' of deep-sea corals have been discovered in the Bremer Canyon Marine Park by Australian and international scientists during an oceanographic expedition aboard Schmidt Ocean Institute's R/V Falkor. (2020-02-28)

Genetic 'fingerprints' implicate gut bacterium in bowel cancer
A common type of bacteria found in our guts could contribute to bowel cancer, according to research funded by a £20 million Cancer Research UK Grand Challenge award and published in Nature today (Thursday). Scientists in The Netherlands, the UK and USA have shown that a toxin released by a strain of E. coli causes unique patterns, or 'fingerprints,' of DNA damage to the cells lining the gut. (2020-02-27)

Technology in higher education: learning with it instead of from it
Technology has shifted the way that professors teach students in higher education. For example, by uploading recorded lectures online, students can reference a digital copy of the topics discussed in class. However, lecture-based teaching traditionally leaves students as consumers of information solely with little room for student creativity or interaction. (2020-02-24)

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