Current Grapes News and Events

Current Grapes News and Events, Grapes News Articles.
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Compounds from apples may boost brain function
Natural compounds found in apples and other fruits may help stimulate the production of new brain cells, which may have implications for learning and memory, according to a new study in mice published in Stem Cell Reports. (2021-02-11)

Samara Polytech scientists proved the anti-cancer properties of a number of plant extracts
The composition of some extracts obtained from plant raw materials was studied at Samara Polytech, and their anticarcinogenic and antioxidant properties were assessed. (2021-02-09)

Grape consumption may protect against UV damage to skin
A recent human study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology found that consuming grapes protected against ultraviolet (UV) skin damage. Study subjects showed increased resistance to sunburn and a reduction in markers of UV damage at the cellular level. Natural components found in grapes known as polyphenols are thought to be responsible for these beneficial effects. (2021-02-05)

The end of domestic wine in 17th century Japan
An historical document clearly indicates that the Hosokawa clan of Japan's Kokura Domain stopped producing wine in 1632, the year before the shogunate ordered them to move to the Higo Domain. Researchers believe the reason for halting wine production was directly related to the move and because wine was considered a drink of Christianity, which was harshly suppressed at that time in Japan. (2021-01-15)

Can water saving traits help wine survive climate change?
Climate change is expected to make many grape-growing regions too hot and dry to produce high-quality wine from traditional varieties. But scientists at the University of California, Davis, have found that wine grape varieties from regions that are more prone to stress have traits that could help them cope with climate change. (2020-12-17)

America's crop cousins are numerous, imperiled, and more needed than ever
A new study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences for the first time outlines how poorly protected these plants are: More than half of the 600 plants assessed in the study may be endangered in their natural habitats, while only 7% are well represented in conservation repositories such as public gene banks and botanical gardens. (2020-12-14)

Chemical compounds in foods can inhibit a key SARS-CoV-2 enzyme
Chemical compounds in foods or beverages like green tea, muscadine grapes and dark chocolate can bind to and block the function of a particular enzyme, or protease, in the SARS-CoV-2 virus, according to a new study by plant biologists at North Carolina State University. (2020-11-30)

Novel Drosophila-based disease model to study human intellectual disability syndrome
The researchers from the TalTech molecular neurobiology laboratory headed by professor Tõnis Timmusk used the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster to develop a novel disease model for Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS). Their study was reported in the July issue of Disease Models and Mechanisms. (2020-09-29)

Detecting soil-surface ozone early can help prevent damage to grapes and apples
Farmers and fruit growers report that climate change is leading to increased ozone concentrations on the soil surface in their fields and orchards, which can cause irreversible plant damage, reduce crop yields and threaten the food supply. Trisha Andrew and colleagues at UMass Amherst, writing in Science Advances, show that her lab's method of vapor-depositing conducting polymer ''tattoos'' on plant leaves can accurately detect and measure such ozone damage, even at low exposure levels. (2020-09-08)

Scientists unlock genetic secrets of wine growers' worst enemy
Following a decade-long effort, scientists have mapped out the genome of an aphid-like pest capable of decimating vineyards. In so doing, they have discovered how it spreads -- and potentially how to stop it. (2020-07-28)

Uncovering the genetic basis of hermaphroditism in grapes, the trait that allowed domestication
Plant experts at UC Davis have defined the genetic basis of sex determination in grapevines, one of the oldest and most valuable crops worldwide. In new research Dario Cantu and Mélanie Massonnet propose a novel model of sex evolution before and during grapevine domestication nearly 8,000 years ago. Their work could have broad application in breeding grapes and other plant species. (2020-06-18)

Late blight research pairs spectroscopy with classic plant pathology diagnostics
Gold and colleagues at the University of Wisconsin-Madison recently published research showing how they used contact spectroscopy to non-destructively sense how plant pathogens differentially damage, impair, and alter plant traits during the course of infection. This research centered on late blight of potato and tomato. The hyperspectral sensors Gold and colleagues used measure light reflectance in the visible to shortwave infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum- 7x more wavelengths than the human eye can see. (2020-06-09)

California's strict air quality regulations help farmers prosper, UCI-led study finds
In a new study in Nature Food, scientists from the University of California, Irvine and other institutions found that pollution controls mandated by the government of California have helped perennial crops produce more fruits and nuts, boosting productivity by $600 million per year from 1980 to 2015. (2020-03-16)

Graphene, perovskites, and silicon -- an ideal tandem for efficient solar cells
Graphene Flagship researchers successfully combined graphene with tandem perovskite-silicon solar cells to achieve efficiencies of up to 26.3%. (2020-03-03)

UBC researchers develop strategy to protect wine grapes from smoke-taint
It's a problem plaguing grape-growers worldwide -- in an ever-changing climate, how can they protect their crops from the undesirable effects of wildfire smoke exposure. A recent study by a team of UBC Okanagan researchers has led to the development of a preventative strategy for protecting grapes from volatile phenols -- flavored compounds present in smoke that may be absorbed into ripening grapes and subsequently impact wine flavor. (2020-02-24)

Genetic marking discovery improves fruit quality, bolsters climate defenses
Transferring genetic markers in plant breeding is a challenge, but a team of grapevine breeders and scientists at Cornell University have come up with a powerful new method that improves fruit quality and acts as a key defense against pests and a changing climate. (2020-01-27)

Switching grape varieties can help save world's wine-growing regions: UBC study
Hotter temperatures threaten global wine production, with multiple studies now forecasting that more than half of regions suitable to planting wine grapes could be lost to climate change. But swapping out grapes for more drought and heat tolerant varieties can offer a way forward for winemakers, finds new research from the University of British Columbia and other collaborating institutions. (2020-01-27)

A new tomato ideal for urban gardens and even outer space
Genetic editing is moving tomato crops from the field to the city skyline, or even outer space. Researchers used CRISPR gene editing to optimize tomatoes for urban agriculture. (2019-12-23)

Research explores how grape pests sniff out berries
A new study, published Nov. 21 in the Journal of Chemical Ecology, investigates how these pests find their target amid a sea of other plants in the landscape. (2019-12-10)

Sustaining roads with grape and agricultural waste
The US spends $5 billion a year to repair damages to road infrastructure from winter snow and ice control operations and the use of traditional deicers. A team of researchers at WSU is developing a more sustainable solution using grape skins and other agricultural waste. (2019-12-02)

Photoinitiators detected in human breast milk
Photoinitators (PIs) are compounds used in the ink of many types of food packaging. The substances have been shown to migrate into food and, when consumed, show up in human blood serum. Now, for the first time, researchers report they have detected PIs in human breast milk, although they say the levels consumed by breastfeeding infants are unlikely to be a health concern. The report appears in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology Letters. (2019-11-20)

Bursting the bubble: Revealing tasty genetic secrets of gigantic single-celled creatures
Researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) recently unveiled key information about gene expression in sea grapes, which could help shed light on the evolution of sea grape morphology and help Okinawan farmers improve cultivation of umi-budo. (2019-11-19)

Uncovering the pathway to wine's acidity
University of Adelaide wine researchers say their latest discovery may one day lead to winemakers being able to manipulate the acidity of wines without the costly addition of tartaric acid. (2019-11-18)

Eelgrass acid and resveratrol produced by cell factories for the first time
Scientists are now able to produce a wide range of sulfated aromatic compounds such as antifouling eelgrass acid, resveratrol and vanillic acid derivatives using microbial production hosts. This pioneering work could lead to new environmentally friendly anti-fouling paint for ships, as well as improved and sustainable nutraceuticals and medicine. (2019-11-04)

New survey confirms muscadine grapes are affected by parasitic nematodes
Muscadines are also known for being hearty grapes, with a tough skin that protects them from many fungal diseases. Bunch grapes are highly susceptible to damage from plant-parasitic nematodes (PPNs), which affect their health, quality, production, and maintenance. Now, thanks to a combined effort between scientists at the University of Georgia and North Carolina State University, we know that PPNs also affect muscadines. (2019-10-15)

Atopic dermatitis: How allergens get on our nerves
Atopic dermatitis, or eczema, primarily affects infants and children. A skin disease characterized by flare-ups, it is often treated with topical anti-inflammatories. A new study led by Inserm researcher Nicolas Gaudenzio, in collaboration with his colleagues at Stanford University shows that immune cells and sensory neurons interact in the skin to form units that can detect allergens and trigger inflammation. Their findings have now been published in the journal Nature Immunology. (2019-10-07)

First maps of areas suitable for spotted lanternfly's establishment in US and world
Maps identifying the areas suitable for establishment of the spotted lanternfly (SLF) in the United States and other countries have been published in the Journal of Economic Entomology by Agricultural Research Service scientists. (2019-10-03)

Raising a glass to grapes' surprising genetic diversity
Here's a discovery well worth toasting: A research team led by Professor Brandon Gaut with the University of California, Irvine and Professor Dario Cantu with the University of California, Davis has deciphered the genome of the Chardonnay grape. By doing so, they have uncovered something fascinating: grapes inherit different numbers of genes from their mothers and fathers. Their paper has just been published in Nature Plants. (2019-09-10)

Researchers gain new insight about bacteria within grapevine-killing crown gall tumors
Scientists have mapped the DNA of bacteria found within a chronic disease affecting grapevines, a feat they hope will ultimately help protect the multibillion-dollar grape industry that produces juice, jelly, wine and other important products. (2019-08-29)

Burgundy wine grapes tell climate story, show warming accelerated in past 30 years
A new series of dates of grape harvest covering the past 664 years is the latest line of evidence confirming how unusual the climate of the past 30 years has been. The record shows wine grapes in Burgundy, France, have been picked 13 days earlier on average since 1988 than they were in the previous six centuries, pointing to the region's hotter and drier climate in recent years. The results are published in Climate of the Past. (2019-08-29)

Shift to more intense rains threatens historic Italian winery
Wine lovers may appreciate a dry white, but a lack of steady rainfall brought on by a changing climate is threatening a centuries old winemaking tradition in Italy, according to an international team of scientists. (2019-08-21)

Compound found in red wine opens door for new treatments for depression, anxiety
A new University at Buffalo-led study has revealed that the plant compound resveratrol, which is found in red wine, displays anti-stress effects by blocking the expression of an enzyme related to the control of stress in the brain. (2019-07-26)

Smart irrigation model predicts rainfall to conserve water
A predictive model combining information about plant physiology, real-time soil conditions and weather forecasts can help make more informed decisions about when and how much to irrigate. This could save 40 percent of the water consumed by more traditional methods, according to new Cornell University research. (2019-07-19)

Given more information about how wine is made, consumers less likely to pay for organic
Consumers are more willing to pay for wine that comes with an organic or organic grape label but providing information about certification standards and organic production practices reduces consumer willingness to pay for all wines. (2019-06-26)

Ancient DNA from Roman and medieval grape seeds reveal ancestry of wine making
A grape variety still used in wine production in France today can be traced back 900 years to just one ancestral plant, scientists have discovered. (2019-06-10)

Pest-killing fungi could protect NYS grapes, apples from invasive insect
Cornell University-led research reports that two local fungal pathogens could potentially curb an invasive insect that has New York vineyard owners on edge. (2019-04-30)

Juice plant pathogen could be treated with newly identified antibacterial agent
There's nothing like a glass of orange juice to start the morning, but prices have soared as the Florida citrus industry fights a citrus greening disease epidemic that has been drying out juice oranges and reducing crop yield. There's no cure, but researchers report that they have identified a fungal compound that may inhibit the causative bacteria. The researchers will present their results today at the American Chemical Society Spring 2019 National Meeting & Exposition. (2019-04-01)

Okinawan sea grapes reveal secrets of plant evolution
Scientists decoded the genome of the popular Okinawan seaweed 'umi-budo' or 'sea grapes,' which could help ease the crop's cultivation and address environmental issues caused by the invasive spread of related species. (2019-03-28)

Deciphering the walnut genome
New research could provide a major boost to the state's growing $1.6 billion walnut industry by making it easier to breed walnut trees better equipped to combat the soil-borne pathogens that now plague many of California's 4,800 growers. (2019-03-26)

GRAPES-3 muon telescope discovers record 1.3 gigavolt potential in a thundercloud
By muon imaging the GRAPES-3 collaboration showed huge voltages develop in supercharged thunderstorms and reported a voltage of 1.3GV on Dec. 1, 2014. This is 10 times larger than previous record of 0.13GV. This verifies the 90-year-old prediction of 1GV by C.T.R. Wilson. Such massive voltages are needed for production of high-energy (100 MeV) gamma-rays detected in terrestrial gamma ray flashes emanating from thunderstorms, first discovered 25 years ago. (2019-03-20)

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