Current Green Space News and Events

Current Green Space News and Events, Green Space News Articles.
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Climate-friendly foam building insulation may do more harm than good
The use of the polymeric flame retardant PolyFR in 'eco-friendly' foam plastic building insulation may be harmful to human health and the environment, according to a new commentary in Environmental Science & Technology. The authors' analysis identifies several points during the lifecycle of foam insulation that may expose workers, communities, and ecosystems to PolyFR and its potentially toxic breakdown products. (2021-02-23)

Measuring hemoglobin levels with AI microscope, microfluidic chips
A complete blood count can help ascertain the health of a patient and typically includes an estimate of the hemoglobin concentration, which can indicate several conditions, including anemia, polycythemia, and pulmonary fibrosis. In AIP Advances, researchers describe a AI-powered imaging-based tool to estimate hemoglobin levels. The setup was developed in conjunction with a microfluidic chip and an AI-powered automated microscope that was designed for deriving the total as well as differential counts of blood cells. (2021-02-23)

Life from Earth could temporarily survive on Mars
German Aerospace Center scientists. The researchers launched these small lifeforms into Earth's stratosphere, which replicates key characteristics of the Martian environment, and found that some microorganisms, in particular spores of black mold, survived the trip. This new way of testing endurance to space travel will be invaluable for understanding the threats and opportunities of microbes in future missions to Mars. (2021-02-22)

Colorful connection found in coral's ability to survive higher temperatures
A coral's color can tell of its resilience to climate change, and a new study from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University has shed light on the underlying genetic factors that may be at work behind this. (2021-02-21)

What impact will robots and autonomous systems have on urban ecosystems?
Unmanned aerial vehicles (drones), autonomous cars, robots that can repair urban infrastructure and wireless sensor networks used for monitoring, etc. are just some of the devices that will spring up all over our cities in a few years. They have a wide range of potential applications, such as autonomous transport, waste collection, infrastructure maintenance and repair, surveillance and precision agriculture, among others. However, we must also consider the impact these technologies will have on urban biodiversity and its ecosystems in the future. (2021-02-19)

New UCF study examines leeches for role in major disease of sea turtles in Florida
University of Central Florida researchers are homing in on the cause of a major disease of sea turtles, with some of their latest findings implicating saltwater leeches as a possible factor. The results, published recently in the journal Diseases of Aquatic Organisms, present the first evidence of a significant association between leeches and the disease in sea turtles, according to the researchers. (2021-02-18)

Bacteria and algae get rides in clouds
Human health and ecosystems could be affected by microbes including cyanobacteria and algae that hitch rides in clouds and enter soil, lakes, oceans and other environments when it rains, according to a Rutgers co-authored study. (2021-02-16)

Research highlights ways to protect astronaut cardiovascular health from space radiation
In the inky blackness of space an invisible threat is ever present - radiation. It can have a huge array of negative effects on astronaut health, including cardiovascular disease. However, if we are ever to journey to the red planet, we will need to understand and reduce this risk. A new review charts a course through what we know about the cardiovascular risks of space radiation, and the best ways to protect space travelers. (2021-02-12)

Flowers of St. John's Wort serve as green catalyst
An interdisciplinary team of scientists from the School of Science at TU Dresden has for the first time used dried flowers of St. John's Wort (genus Hypericum) as an active catalyst in various photochemical reactions. This conceptually new and sustainable process was registered as a German patent and presented in the journal 'Green Chemistry'. (2021-02-12)

Study finds even the common house sparrow is declining
A new study by Cornell Lab of Ornithology scientists aims to clarify the status of the non-native European House Sparrow, using 21 years of citizen science data from the Cornell Lab's Project FeederWatch. (2021-02-11)

Mediterranean-style diet linked to better thinking skills in later life
People who eat a Mediterranean-style diet--particularly one rich in green leafy vegetables and low in meat--are more likely to stay mentally sharp in later life, a study shows. Closely adhering to a Mediterranean diet was associated with higher scores on a range of memory and thinking tests among adults in their late 70s, the research found. The study found no link, however, between the Mediterranean-style diet and better brain health. (2021-02-10)

Northwestern scholar to talk about science of teams in space at AAAS
Noshir Contractor, along with Leslie DeChurch and NASA researcher Suzanne Bell, developed a computational model that predicts interpersonal conflicts between team members (such as astronauts) with 75-80% accuracy and prescribes interventions to repair their interactions and relationships. (2021-02-10)

Infant and toddler food product names may not accurately reflect ingredient amounts
The descriptions on the fronts of infant and toddler food packages may not accurately reflect the actual ingredient amounts, according to new research. (2021-02-10)

Researchers study how lifelong environmentalists want their remains handled after death
A new study from the University of Kansas in the journal Mortality details how older environmentalists consider death care and how likely they are to choose ''green'' burials and other eco-friendly options. (2021-02-09)

Drinking green tea, coffee lowers risk of death for stroke and heart attack survivors
Stroke survivors who drank seven or more cups of green tea each day lowered their risks of multiple causes of death by 62%. Drinking one cup of coffee each day lowered the risks of death for heart attack survivors and for those without a history of stroke or heart attack. (2021-02-04)

Nickel phosphide nanoparticle catalyst is the full package
Osaka University researchers prepared a nickel phosphide nanoparticle catalyst on a hydrotalcite support (nano-Ni2P/HT) that showed high activity and selectivity in the hydrogenation of D-glucose to D-sorbitol. The catalyst was air-stable, reusable, and effective in water and at 25°C or 1 bar hydrogen gas pressure. Its mild operating conditions will contribute to the low-cost, green, and sustainable production of D-sorbitol for food, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. (2021-02-04)

Large-area periodic perovskite nanostructures for lenticular printing laser displays
We fabricated large-area periodic structures with spatial resolution at wavelength scale from hybrid perovskite materials via a space-confined solution growth method. It takes advantages of both high refractive index contrast and high luminescence brightness, which allows the optical modulation on not only the reflection of illumination, but also the light emission from hybrid perovskites. The distributed feedback within these periodic structures significantly improves the degree of polarization and directionality of laser action while its threshold is also reduced. (2021-02-04)

Air-guiding in solid-core optical waveguides: A solution for on-chip trace gas spectroscopy
We demonstrate an air-suspended waveguide that exhibits exceptional field delocalization and an external field confinement of 107 %, providing a stronger interaction with the surrounding air than a free-space beam. Operating at mid-infrared wavelengths, the waveguide is an ideal building block of next-generation on-chip sensors for sensitive and specific trace gas detection by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). (2021-02-02)

How do electrons close to Earth reach almost the speed of light?
In the Van Allen radiation belts, electrons can reach almost speed of light. Hayley Allison and Yuri Shprits, German Research Centre for Geosciences, have revealed conditions for such strong accelerations. They had demonstrated in 2020: during solar storm plasma waves play a crucial role. However, it remained unclear why ultra-relativistic electron energies are not achieved in all solar storms. In Science Advances they now show: extreme depletions of the background plasma density are crucial. (2021-02-02)

High-speed holographic fluorescence microscopy system with submicron resolution
The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), Tohoku University, Toin University of Yokohama, and Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) have succeeded in developing a scanless high-speed holographic fluorescence microscopy system with submicron resolution for a 3D space. The system is based on digital holography. The developed microscopy system has an algorithm to acquire 3D information of fluorescent objects toward scanless 3D measurement in less than 1 millisecond. (2021-01-29)

Historically redlined neighborhoods are more likely to lack greenspace today
Historically redlined neighborhoods are more likely to have a paucity of greenspace today compared to other neighborhoods. The study by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco, demonstrates the lasting effects of redlining, a racist mortgage appraisal practice of the 1930s that established and exacerbated racial residential segregation in the United States. (2021-01-27)

Microbiome Search Engine 2 helps researchers explore microbiome space
To correlate the newly developed microbiomes with existing data sets, researchers from the Qingdao Institute of BioEnergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and their collaborators developed the Microbiome Search Engine 2 (MSE 2). (2021-01-22)

Fungi strengthen plants to fend off aphids
Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have demonstrated that unique fungi strengthen the ''immune systems'' of wheat and bean plants against aphids. Fungi enter and influence the amount of a plant's own defences, resulting in fewer aphids. The results could serve to reduce agricultural insecticide use and bring Denmark a step further along the path towards its green transition. (2021-01-22)

New eco-friendly way to make ammonia could be boon for agriculture, hydrogen economy
Ammonia has sustained humanity since the early 20th century, but its production leaves a huge carbon footprint. Now researchers have found a way to make it 100 per cent renewable. (2021-01-21)

Rethink immigration policy for STEM doctorates
A streamlined process for awarding green cards to international STEM doctoral students graduating from U.S. universities could benefit American innovation and competitiveness, including leveling the field for startups eager to attract such highly skilled workers, according to a new study by researchers from Cornell University and the University of California, San Diego. (2021-01-21)

50 million-year-old fossil assassin bug has unusually well-preserved genitalia
The fossilized insect is tiny and its genital capsule, called a pygophore, is roughly the length of a grain of rice. It is remarkable, scientists say, because the bug's physical characteristics -- from the bold banding pattern on its legs to the internal features of its genitalia -- are clearly visible and well-preserved. Recovered from the Green River Formation in present-day Colorado, the fossil represents a new genus and species of predatory insects known as assassin bugs. (2021-01-19)

Could "Power Walking" fuel the energy revolution? India is ready to step up
India has an energy problem. It currently relies heavily on coal and consumer demand is expected to double by 2040, making its green energy targets look out of reach. Part of the solution could come from harvesting energy from footsteps, say Hari Anand and Binod Kumar Singh from the University of Petroleum and Energy Studies in Dehradun, India. Their new study, published in the De Gruyter journal Energy Harvesting and Systems, shows that Indian attitudes towards power generated through piezoelectric tiles are overwhelmingly positive. (2021-01-19)

Aphids suck: Invasive aphid found on Danish apple trees
The spirea aphid, Aphis spiraecola, an invasive pest, has been discovered for the first time in Denmark by University of Copenhagen researchers. The extent of its current distribution remains unknown, but in time, it could prove to be a troublesome pest for Danish apple growers. (2021-01-19)

Study identifies a nonhuman primate model that mimics severe COVID-19 similar to humans
Aged, wild-caught African green monkeys exposed to the SARS-CoV-2 virus developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) with clinical symptoms similar to those observed in the most serious human cases of COVID-19, report researchers in The American Journal of Pathology, published by Elsevier. This is the first study to show that African green monkeys can develop severe clinical disease after SARS-CoV-2 infection, suggesting that they may be useful models for the study of COVID-19 in humans. (2021-01-19)

Astronomers dissect the anatomy of planetary nebulae using Hubble Space Telescope images
Images of two iconic planetary nebulae taken by the Hubble Space Telescope are revealing new information about how they develop their dramatic features. Researchers from Rochester Institute of Technology and Green Bank Observatory presented new findings about the Butterfly Nebula (NGC 6302) and the Jewel Bug Nebula (NGC 7027) at the 237th meeting of the American Astronomical Society on Friday, Jan. 15, 2021. (2021-01-19)

Green med diet cuts non-alcoholic fatty liver disease by half - Ben-Gurion U. study
Overall, the green MED diet produced dramatic reductions in fatty liver. NAFLD prevalence dropped from 62% at baseline to 31.5% in the green Mediterranean group, down to 47.9% in the Mediterranean group and 54.8% in the healthy dietary regimen group. Addressing this common liver disease by targeted lifestyle intervention might promote a more effective nutritional strategy. This Ben-Gurion University of the Negev clinical trial demonstrates an effective nutritional tool for NAFLD beyond weight loss (2021-01-18)

Climate impacts on health and urban areas: Heatwaves and death rate
Heat does not kill in the same way everywhere. Urban planning, social cohesion, traffic, crime: the urban and social context can worsen the vulnerability of individuals to heatwaves, with differences even within the same city. An analysis of the scientific literature conducted by CMCC@Ca'Foscari. (2021-01-15)

Hubble pinpoints supernova blast
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has observed the supernova remnant named 1E 0102.2-7219. Researchers are using Hubble's imagery of the remnant object to wind back the clock on the expanding remains of this exploded star in the hope of understanding the supernova event that caused it 1700 years ago. (2021-01-15)

Red and green snow algae increase snowmelt in the Antarctic Peninsula
Red and green algae that grow on snow in the Antarctic Peninsula cause significant extra snowmelt on par with melt from dust on snow in the Rocky Mountains, according to a first-of-its-kind scientific research study. This could have serious impacts on regional climate, snow and ice melt, freshwater availability and ecosystems, yet is not accounted for in current global climate models. (2021-01-13)

Penned release of green geckos has potential to help preserve threatened native species
In a paper just published in the New Zealand Journal of Ecology, the Department of Zoology researchers outlined how they translocated 19 barking geckos to Mana Island, using the method of penned release - enclosing them in a 100m² pen for three months so they get used to the site and hopefully establish a breeding population. (2021-01-13)

Arecibo observatory helps find possible 'first hints' of low-frequency gravitational waves
Data from Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico has been used to help detect the first possible hints of low-frequency disturbances in the curvature of space-time. The results were presented today at the 237th meeting of the American Astronomical Society, which was held virtually, and are published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters (2021-01-11)

Orange is the new 'block'
New research from Washington University in St. Louis reveals the core structure of the light-harvesting antenna of cyanobacteria or blue-green algae -- including key features that both collect energy and block excess light absorption. Scientists built a model of the large protein complex called phycobilisome that collects and transmits light energy. Phycobilisomes allow cyanobacteria to take advantage of different wavelengths of light than other photosynthetic organisms. The study, published Jan. 6, 2020 in Science Advances, yields insights relevant to future energy applications. (2021-01-06)

Beating the bulge with a nice cup of tea
Researchers led by the University of Tsukuba found that healthy volunteers who consumed oolong tea every day had much higher levels of fat breakdown compared with the placebo group, and that the effects were most noticeable during sleep. Importantly, the volunteers developed a tolerance to caffeine over the 2-week study period, with their sleep patterns remaining unaffected by tea or caffeine consumption, indicating that oolong tea may have clinical relevance for weight control. (2021-01-06)

Study explains why patients with cancer spread to the liver have worse outcomes
A new study finds that tumors in the liver siphon off critical immune cells, rendering immunotherapy ineffective. But coupling immunotherapy with radiotherapy to the liver in mice restored the immune cell function and led to better outcomes. (2021-01-04)

A robotic revolution for urban nature
Drones, robots and autonomous systems can transform the natural world in and around cities for people and wildlife. (2021-01-04)

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