Current Greenhouse Gas Emissions News and Events

Current Greenhouse Gas Emissions News and Events, Greenhouse Gas Emissions News Articles.
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Semiconductor chip that detects exhaled gas with high sensitivity at room temperature
The research team at Toyohashi University of Technology developed a testing chip using semiconductor micro-machining that can detect volatile gasses in exhaled breath in ppm concentrations at room temperature. The testing chip, which is formed in the size of a few square millimeters with semiconductor micro-machining technology, is expected to contribute to telehealth as an IoT gas sensor that can easily be used in the home for breath tests. (2021-01-19)

A new carbon budget framework provides a clearer view of our climate deadlines
Nature's Communications Earth and Environment just published a paper by a group of researchers led by Damon Matthews in which they present a new framework for calculating the remaining carbon budget that is able to generate a much narrower estimate and its uncertainty. The researchers estimate that between 230 and 440 billion more tonnes of CO2 from 2020 onwards can be emitted into the atmosphere and still provide a reasonable chance of limiting global warming to 1.5°C. (2021-01-19)

Astronomers dissect the anatomy of planetary nebulae using Hubble Space Telescope images
Images of two iconic planetary nebulae taken by the Hubble Space Telescope are revealing new information about how they develop their dramatic features. Researchers from Rochester Institute of Technology and Green Bank Observatory presented new findings about the Butterfly Nebula (NGC 6302) and the Jewel Bug Nebula (NGC 7027) at the 237th meeting of the American Astronomical Society on Friday, Jan. 15, 2021. (2021-01-19)

A 'super-puff' planet like no other
A Canadian-led team of astronomers discovers that the core mass of exoplanet WASP-107b is much lower than previously thought possible for a gas-giant planet. (2021-01-18)

UCI researchers: Climate change will alter the position of the Earth's tropical rain belt
In a study to be published Jan. 18 in Nature Climate Change, researchers at the University of California, Irvine describe future changes to the tropical rain belt with expected climate change. The changes will cause droughts in large sections of the globe, threatening biodiversity and food security. (2021-01-18)

Carbon pricing's disappointing effect on the pace of technological change
In order to achieve the goals of the Paris Agreement, the world must reach net-zero carbon emissions by 2050. Carbon pricing is viewed by many governments and experts as the most important climate policy instrument. However, a new study shows that carbon pricing has been less effective as a driver of technological change than was previously anticipated. (2021-01-18)

Changing resilience of oceans to climate change
Oxygen levels in the ancient oceans were surprisingly resilient to climate change, new research suggests. (2021-01-15)

Stuck in a rut: Ocean acidification locks algal communities in a simplified state
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that ocean acidification limits algal communities to a state of low diversity and complexity. Communities grown in waters rich in carbon dioxide (CO2) were dominated by turf algae, and had low biodiversity, ecological complexity and biomass. Communities grown under acidic conditions and then transferred to waters that weren't CO2-enriched increased their biodiversity and complexity, showing that they can recover if CO2 emissions are significantly reduced. (2021-01-15)

Researchers trace geologic origins of Gulf of Mexico 'super basin' success
The Gulf of Mexico holds huge untapped offshore oil deposits that could help power the U.S. for decades. According to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin, the basin's vast oil and gas reserves are the result of a remarkable geologic past. Only a fraction of the oil has been extracted and much remains buried beneath ancient salt layers, just recently illuminated by modern seismic imaging. (2021-01-15)

Human-induced climate change caused the northwestern Pacific warming record in August 2020
A new study led by National Institute for Environmental Studies researchers, published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, revealed that the record-warm sea surface temperature over the northwestern Pacific in August 2020 could not be expected to occur without human-induced climate changes. Such extremely warm condition is likely to become a new normal climate in August by the mid-21st century, needing the prompt implementation of adaptation measures for anthropogenic global warming. (2021-01-14)

Concept for a hybrid-electric plane may reduce aviation's air pollution problem
A proposed hybrid-electric plane could ''eliminate aviation's air pollution problem,'' say MIT engineers. Their design could reduce global nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions by 95 percent, they report in a study. (2021-01-14)

A climate in crisis calls for investment in direct air capture, news research finds
There is a growing consensus among scientists as well as national and local governments representing hundreds of millions of people, that humanity faces a climate crisis that demands a crisis response. New research from the University of California San Diego explores one possible mode of response: a massively funded program to deploy direct air capture (DAC) systems that remove CO2 directly from the ambient air and sequester it safely underground. (2021-01-14)

Giving the hydrogen economy an acid test
Tsukuba University scientists show that the effectiveness of hydrogen-producing metal catalysts protected by graphene depends on the ability of protons to penetrate into the inner metallic surface. This work may lead to widely available hydrogen-powered cars. (2021-01-14)

How aerosols are formed
ETH Zurich researchers conducted an experiment to investigate the initial steps in the formation of aerosols. Their findings are now aiding efforts to better understand and model that process - for example, the formation of clouds in the atmosphere. (2021-01-14)

Turn off that camera during virtual meetings, environmental study says
A new study says that despite a record drop in global carbon emissions in 2020, a pandemic-driven shift to remote work and more at-home entertainment still presents significant environmental impact due to how internet data is stored and transferred around the world. (2021-01-14)

New state of matter in one-dimensional quantum gas
By adding some magnetic flair to an exotic quantum experiment, physicists produced an ultra-stable one-dimensional quantum gas with never-before-seen ''scar'' states - a feature that could someday be useful for securing quantum information. (2021-01-14)

Extreme fire weather
When the Thomas Fire raged through Ventura and Santa Barbara counties in December 2017, Danielle Touma, at the time an earth science researcher at Stanford, was stunned by its severity. Burning for more than a month and scorching 440 square miles, the fire was then considered the worst in California's history. (2021-01-14)

Upper ocean temperatures hit record high in 2020
The ocean temperatures continued a trend of breaking records in 2020. A new study, authored by 20 scientists from 13 institutes around the world, reported the highest ocean temperatures since 1955 from surface level to a depth of 2,000 meters. (2021-01-13)

How will we achieve carbon-neutral flight in future?
Carbon-neutral aviation is possible, but in future, aircraft are likely to continue to be powered by fossil fuels. The CO2 they emit must be systematically stored underground. This is the most economical of various approaches that ETH researchers have compared in detail. (2021-01-13)

The meat of the matter: Environmental dissemination of beef cattle agrochemicals
A recent Point of Reference article, ''The meat of the matter: Environmental dissemination of beef cattle agrochemicals,'' published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, points at synthetic chemical cocktails being emitted from cattle feed yards into the environment and how they can impact our ecosystem and our health. (2021-01-13)

Melting icebergs key to sequence of an ice age, scientists find
Scientists claim to have found the 'missing link' in the process that leads to an ice age on Earth. (2021-01-13)

Northern lakes at risk of losing ice cover permanently, impacting drinking water
Close to 5,700 lakes in the Northern Hemisphere may permanently lose ice cover this century, 179 of them in the next decade, at current greenhouse gas emissions, despite a possible polar vortex this year, researchers at York University have found. Those lakes include large bays in some of the deepest of the Great Lakes, such as Lake Superior and Lake Michigan, which could permanently become ice free by 2055. (2021-01-13)

Wetland methane cycling increased during ancient global warming event
Wetland methane cycling increased during a rapid global warming event 56 million years ago and could foreshadow changes the methane cycle will experience in the future, according to new research led by the University of Bristol. (2021-01-13)

Study looks at how land acquisitions affect climate change
In a newly published study in the journal Nature Food, researchers looked at what drives large-scale land acquisitions and how the implementation of large-scale land acquisitions for agricultural development affect carbon emissions, and in turn, climate change. (2021-01-13)

Early COVID-19 lockdowns had less impact on urban air quality than first believed
The first COVID-19 lockdowns led to significant changes in urban air pollution levels around the world, but the changes were smaller than expected - a new study reveals. (2021-01-13)

'Ocean 100': Small group of companies dominate ocean economy
Dubbed the 'Ocean 100', the group of companies generated US$1.1 trillion in revenues in 2018, according to the research published in the journal Science Advances. (2021-01-13)

Earth to reach temperature tipping point in next 20 to 30 years, new NAU study finds
Postdoc Katharyn Duffy led an international team that looked at 20 years of data from throughout the world and found that record-breaking temperatures are contributing to a significant decrease in plants' ability to absorb human-caused carbon emissions. (2021-01-13)

Earth's terrestrial ecosystems may transition from carbon sinks to carbon sources within decades
Rising temperatures could trigger Earth's terrestrial ecosystems to transition from carbon sinks to carbon sources in the next 20 to 30 years, according to data from the world's largest continuous carbon monitoring network. The researchers suggest that up to half of land ecosystems could reach this tipping point - when plants begin to release carbon into the atmosphere. (2021-01-13)

Soil degradation costs U.S. corn farmers a half-billion dollars every year
One-third of the fertilizer applied to grow corn in the U.S. each year simply compensates for the ongoing loss of soil fertility, leading to more than a half-billion dollars in extra costs to U.S. farmers every year, finds new research from the University of Colorado Boulder. (2021-01-12)

Galaxy mergers could limit star formation
Astronomers have looked nine billion years into the past to find evidence that galaxy mergers in the early universe could shut down star formation and affect galaxy growth. (2021-01-11)

New process more efficiently recycles excess CO2 into fuel, study finds
For years, researchers have worked to repurpose excess atmospheric carbon dioxide into new chemicals, fuels and other products traditionally made from hydrocarbons harvested from fossil fuels. The recent push to mitigate the climactic effects of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has chemists on their toes to find the most efficient means possible. A new study introduces an electrochemical reaction, enhanced by polymers, to improve CO2-to-ethylene conversion efficiency over previous attempts. (2021-01-11)

UVA-led team expands power grid planning to improve system resilience
Researchers' paper in Nature Energy demonstrates that modernizing power grids and using renewable energy will be cheaper than repairing hurricane damage. (2021-01-11)

Carbon monoxide reduced to valuable liquid fuels
Rice engineers develop a reactor to produce liquid acetic acid directly from carbon monoxide. (2021-01-11)

'Swiss Army knife' catalyst can make natural gas burn cleaner
'Swiss Army knife' catalyst can bring the combustion temperature of methane down by about half - from above 1400 degrees Kelvin down to 600 to 700 degrees Kelvin. (2021-01-11)

Machine learning accelerates discovery of materials for use in industrial processes
Research led by scientists at the University of Toronto and Northwestern University employs machine learning to craft the best building blocks in the assembly of reticular framework materials for use in a targeted application. The findings demonstrate that the use of artificial intelligence approaches can help in proposing novel materials for diverse applications such as clean energy, sensoring and biomedicine, by accelerating the design cycle for materials. (2021-01-11)

Positive 'tipping points' offer hope for climate
Positive 'tipping points' could spark cascading changes that accelerate action on climate change, experts say. (2021-01-10)

Native biodiversity collapse in the Eastern Mediterranean
An international team led by Paolo G. Albano from the Department of Palaeontology at the University of Vienna quantified a dramatic biodiversity collapse of up to 95 per cent of native species in the Eastern Mediterranean. The study is published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. (2021-01-07)

Energy sorghum may combine best of annual, perennial bioenergy crops
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Center for Advanced Bioenergy and Bioproducts Innovation (CABBI) found that energy sorghum, an annual crop, behaves more like the perennial grass miscanthus in the way it efficiently captures light and uses water to produce abundant biomass. The findings highlight energy sorghum's potential as a sustainable bioenergy crop and provide critical data for biogeochemical and ecological models used to forecast crop growth, productivity, and sustainability. (2021-01-07)

It's getting hot in here: Warming world will fry power plant production in coming years
During the year's hottest months, many people rely on electricity-generated cooling systems to remain comfortable. But the power plants that keep air conditioners pushing out cold air could soon be in a vicious cycle in a warming world-not able to keep up with growing demands on hotter days and driving up greenhouse gas emissions to dangerous levels. (2021-01-06)

Uncovering how grasslands changed our climate
Grasslands are managed worldwide to support livestock production, while remaining natural or semi-natural ones provide critical services that contribute to the wellbeing of both people and the planet. Human activities are however causing grasslands to become a source of greenhouse gas emissions rather than a carbon sink. A new study uncovered how grasslands used by humans have changed our climate over the last centuries. (2021-01-05)

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