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Current Greenhouse Gas Emissions News and Events, Greenhouse Gas Emissions News Articles.
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Traffic reductions due to COVID-19 boost air quality in some states but not all
Dramatic decreases in traffic caused by COVID-19 shutdowns improved air quality in car-dependent states but didn't offset additional forms of pollution in other parts of the country. (2021-02-10)

Solar awnings over parking lots help companies and customers
Michigan Tech engineers look into the untapped potential of parking lots in a study that investigates the energy-related benefits of developing charging stations powered with solar canopies built into the parking infrastructure of large-scale retailers like Walmart. (2021-02-10)

Reductions in CFC-11 emissions put ozone recovery back on track
An international research team, including scientists from MIT, have observed a global reduction of the banned ozone-depleting chemical CFC-11, after it spiked unexpectedly several years ago. (2021-02-10)

Limiting warming to 2 C requires emissions reductions 80% above Paris Agreement targets
Even if all countries meet their Paris Agreement goals for reducing emissions, Earth has only a 5% chance of staying below 2 C warming this century, a 2017 study showed. But reductions about 80% more ambitious, or an average of 1.8% drop in emissions per year rather than 1% per year, would be enough to meet the agreement's stated goal, analysis shows. (2021-02-09)

New study finds climate change shrinks and shifts juvenile white shark range
Unprecedented sightings of juvenile white sharks at the northern end of Monterey Bay signal a significant shift in the young white sharks' range. Researchers conclude the northward range shift demonstrates the young sharks are being subjected to a loss of suitable thermal habitat, meaning water temperatures within their preferred temperature range are becoming harder to find. (2021-02-09)

From trash to treasure: Silicon waste finds new use in Li-ion batteries
Researchers at Osaka University used Si swarf and ultrathin graphite sheets to fabricate Li-ion battery electrodes with high areal capacity and current density at a reduced cost. Increasing generation of Si swarf as industrial waste and potential use of the high-performance batteries in electronic vehicles will allow their work to contribute to reduced greenhouse gas emissions and the achievement of SDGs. (2021-02-09)

High greenhouse gas emissions from Siberian Inland Waters
Rivers and lakes at high latitudes are considered to be major sources for greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, but these losses are poorly constrained. In a study published in Nature Communications, UmeƄ University researchers and collaborators quantify carbon emissions from rivers and lakes across Western Siberia, finding that emission are high and exceed carbon export to the Arctic Ocean. (2021-02-09)

Arctic permafrost releases more CO2 than once believed
There may be greater CO2 emissions associated with thawing Arctic permafrost than ever imagined. An international team of researchers, including one from the University of Copenhagen, has discovered that soil bacteria release CO2 previously thought to be trapped by iron. The finding presents a large new carbon footprint that is unaccounted for in current climate models. (2021-02-09)

The pandemic lockdown leads to cleaner city air across Canada, Concordia paper reveals
Researchers at Concordia University found that emission levels dropped dramatically over the course of the pandemic. They measured downtown air quality monitoring station data from eight Canadian cities and compared their concentration levels of nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide and sulfur dioxide between February and August 2020 to the figures recorded over the same period in 2018 and 2019. They also used satellite imagery and urban transportation fuel consumption figures to investigate emissions traffic congestion data provided by tracking technology embedded in phones and cars worldwide. (2021-02-09)

Shining a light on the true value of solar power
Utility companies have worried that solar panels drive up electric costs for the people who don't have panels. Michigan Tech renewable energy researchers show the opposite is actually true -- grid-tied solar photovoltaic (PV) owners are actually subsidizing their non-PV neighbors. (2021-02-09)

Low carbon transport at sea: Ferries voyage optimization in the Adriatic
What CO2 savings are potentially attainable through path optimization? How much can ferries' carbon intensity be decreased? What is the role of waves and currents? A new study led by the CMCC Foundation shows how the future least-CO2 ferry routes could look like. (2021-02-09)

RUDN University ecologist suggested a way to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in animal farming
An ecologist from RUDN University suggested a method to evaluate and reduce the effect of animal farms on climate change and developed a set of measures for small farms that provides for the complete elimination of greenhouse gas emissions. (2021-02-09)

International research team begins uncovering Arctic mystery
According to 25 international researchers who collaborated on a first-of-its-kind study, frozen land beneath rising sea levels currently traps 60 billion tons of methane and 560 billion tons of organic carbon. Little is known about the frozen sediment and soil -- called submarine permafrost -- even as it slowly thaws and releases methane and carbon that could have significant impacts on climate. (2021-02-09)

Coal and COVID-19: How the pandemic is accelerating the end of fossil power generation
COVID-19 has not only caused a temporary drop in global CO2 emissions, it has also reduced the share of power generated by burning coal - a trend that could in fact outlast the pandemic. This is the key result of a new study by a team of economists based in Potsdam and Berlin that looked at COVID-19's impact on the energy system and demand for electricity. (2021-02-08)

Ditching the car for walking or biking just one day a week cuts carbon footprint
Swapping the car for walking, cycling and e-biking even just one day a week makes a significant impact on personal carbon emissions in cities. (2021-02-08)

Does Goal 7 Energy for All need a rethink?
Goal 7 of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) aims to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all by 2030. Yet according to new research by Copenhagen Business School the poor planning and execution of decarbonisation strategies in emerging markets challenges the aims of Goal 7. (2021-02-08)

Better understanding the reasons behind Arctic amplified warming
EPFL professor Julia Schmale is calling on scientists to conduct dedicated process studies and to share their data and research findings on Arctic warming. She stresses the importance of studying how aerosols and clouds interact, as these highly complex and poorly understood mechanisms play a key role in climate change, but are also strongly affected by it. According to her, the region is in rapid transition and scientists need to act to not run behind. (2021-02-08)

Mixed and matched: Integrating metal-organic frameworks into polymers for CO2 separation
Polymer matrices can be combined with metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to enhance their performance for CO2 separation. However, it is challenging to find compatible interactions between MOFs and polymers for this purpose. Now, an international team of scientists has developed a simple strategy to incorporate zirconium-based MOFs into a polymer matrix via covalent bonds. The resulting membranes show excellent gas separation performance, stability, and tolerance to harsh conditions, helping erode current barriers for industrial applications. (2021-02-08)

Man-made borders threaten wildlife as climate changes
Walls and fences designed to secure national borders could make it difficult for almost 700 mammal species to adapt to climate change, according to new research. (2021-02-08)

How rocks rusted on Earth and turned red
How did rocks rust on Earth and turn red? A Rutgers-led study has shed new light on the important phenomenon and will help address questions about the Late Triassic climate more than 200 million years ago, when greenhouse gas levels were high enough to be a model for what our planet may be like in the future. (2021-02-08)

Cleaning Up the Mississippi River
Professor R. Eugene Turner reconstructed a 100-year record chronicling water quality trends in the lower Mississippi River by compiling water quality data collected from 1901 to 2019. The Mississippi River is the largest river in North America with about 30 million people living within its watershed. He tracked pH levels and concentrations of bacteria, oxygen, lead and sulphate in this new study. (2021-02-08)

New research reveals drivers of regionally different ozone responses to the COVID-19
Professor Ding Aijun explored global air-quality changes during COVID-19 lockdowns and regional disparities in O3 responses to emission reductions. They integrated multiple observational datasets, including global air quality monitoring network and satellite retrievals, to shed more light on the regional differences in interactions between emissions, atmospheric chemistry, and meteorological conditions. (2021-02-07)

Climate change may have driven the emergence of SARS-CoV-2
Global greenhouse gas emissions over the last century have made southern China a hotspot for bat-borne coronaviruses, by driving growth of forest habitat favoured by bats. (2021-02-05)

Bioplastics in the sustainability dilemma
Scientists at the University of Bonn (Germany) found that the sustainability of plant-based bioplastics depends largely on the country of origin, its trade relationships and the raw material processed. (2021-02-05)

Fingerprint for the formation of nitrous oxide emissions
Scientists led by Eliza Harris and Michael Bahn from the Institute of Ecology at the University of Innsbruck have succeeded in studying emissions of the greenhouse gas N2O under the influence of environmental impacts in an unprecedented level of detail. The study, which has now been published in Science Advances, is thus also a starting point for the creation of models that could predict future trends in the greenhouse gas emission dynamics of ecosystems under global climate change. (2021-02-05)

Arctic stew: Understanding how high-latitude lakes respond to and affect climate change
To arrive at Nunavut, turn left at the Dakotas and head north. You can't miss it--the vast tundra territory covers almost a million square miles of northern Canada. Relatively few people call this lake-scattered landscape home, but the region plays a crucial role in understanding global climate change. (2021-02-05)

Global warming found to be culprit for flood risk in Peruvian Andes, other glacial lakes
Human-caused warming is responsible for increasing the risk of a glacial outburst flood from Peru's Lake Palcacocha, threatening the city below. This study is the first to directly link climate change with the risk of flooding from glacial lakes, which are growing in number and size worldwide. (2021-02-04)

Student astronomer finds galactic missing matter
Half of the universe's matter is 'missing', but PhD student Yuanming Wang has developed an ingenious method to help track it down. She has done this using distant galaxies as 'locator pins' to detect an otherwise 'invisible' cold clump of gas just 10 light years from Earth. (2021-02-04)

Huge methane emission rise follows extreme rainfall in East Africa
Recent heavy rainfall in East Africa has led to substantially larger seasonal emissions of a potent greenhouse gas, new research shows. (2021-02-03)

What the Biden-Harris administration means for chemistry
The inauguration of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris marks a new era for science policy in the U.S. and beyond. The new administration has inherited a global pandemic and worsening climate change, among other science-related issues. A cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, delves into what this means for chemists and chemistry as a whole. (2021-02-03)

Air-guiding in solid-core optical waveguides: A solution for on-chip trace gas spectroscopy
We demonstrate an air-suspended waveguide that exhibits exceptional field delocalization and an external field confinement of 107 %, providing a stronger interaction with the surrounding air than a free-space beam. Operating at mid-infrared wavelengths, the waveguide is an ideal building block of next-generation on-chip sensors for sensitive and specific trace gas detection by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). (2021-02-02)

Study indicates US cities underestimate their GHG emissions by nearly 20%
Professor Kevin Gurney of Northern Arizona University's School of Informatics, Computing, and Cyber Systems and colleagues have compared the self-reported emissions inventories published by 48 major US cities to estimates from a state-of-the-art emissions information system. As described in Nature Communications, Gurney and his research collaborators found large differences and a systematic under-reporting of urban emissions by cities. (2021-02-02)

NREL reports sustainability benchmarks for plastics recycling and redesign
Researchers developing renewable plastics and exploring new processes for plastics upcycling and recycling technologies will now be able to easily baseline their efforts to current manufacturing practices to understand if their efforts will save energy and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Benchmark data calculated and compiled at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide a measurement -- at the supply chain level -- of how much energy is required and the amount of greenhouse gases emitted from the production of a variety of plastics in the United States. (2021-02-02)

COVID-19 lockdowns temporarily raised global temperatures
The lockdowns and reduced societal activity related to the COVID-19 pandemic affected emissions of pollutants in ways that slightly warmed the planet for several months last year, according to new research led by NCAR. The counterintuitive finding highlights the influence of airborne particles, or aerosols, that block incoming sunlight. (2021-02-02)

At cosmic noon, puffy galaxies make stars for longer
Massive galaxies with extra-large extended ''puffy'' disks produced stars for longer than their more compact cousins, new modelling reveals. (2021-02-02)

Land-use to solve climate change: a focus on livestock
The land sector can strongly contribute to climate change mitigation if sustainable land-use options are applied. A study led by the CMCC Foundation highlights that land-based mitigation options at small-scale landscape level can lead towards carbon neutral livestock systems while providing an additional wide range of ecological, environmental and socio-economic co-benefits at local level. (2021-02-01)

Improved model estimates impact of ozone on soy crops
The impact of ozone on soybean production can be predicted more accurately thanks to improvements to a computer modelling system. (2021-02-01)

Virtual conference CO2 emissions quantified in new study
The virtual conferencing that has replaced large, in-person gatherings in the age of COVID-19 represents a drastic reduction in carbon emissions, but those online meetings still come with their own environmental costs, new research from the University of Michigan shows. (2021-02-01)

Human activity caused the long-term growth of greenhouse gas methane
Decadal growth rate of methane in the atmosphere varied dramatically over the past 30 yeas with three distinct periods of slowed (1988-1998), quasi-stationary (1999-2006) and renewed (2007-2016) phases. An inverse analysis with atmospheric chemistry transport modeling explained these variations consistently. While emissions from oil and gas exploitation and natural climate events caused the slowed growth and the temporary pause, those from coal mining in China and livestock farming in the tropics drove the renewed growth. (2021-01-29)

Methane emissions from coal mines are higher than previously thought
Methane emissions from coal mines are likely higher than previously calculated, because of emissions from abandoned mines and higher content in deep coal seams. (2021-01-29)

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