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Current Greenhouse Gas Emissions News and Events, Greenhouse Gas Emissions News Articles.
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Addressing committed emissions in both US and China requires carbon capture and storage
While the energy systems of the two highest-emitting countries differ, each needs to develop CCS to address their committed emissions, which threaten global climate targets. (2019-12-19)

If the world can capture carbon, there's capacity to store it
Humankind will need to harness carbon capture and storage technologies to help keep global warming to 2 degrees C or less. New research shows that there's plenty of room to store captured CO2 -- in offshore geologic rock formations. (2019-12-18)

Scientists of Samara Polytech have developed new lubricant oils with special properties
Due to gases temperatures up to 800 - 1500 °C and high turbine shaft speed, not all metal materials can stand engines rigid conditions, say nothing about lubricants. To solve the problem Samara Polytech chemists found substances that increase the thermal stability of aircraft oils. (2019-12-18)

Switching cereals in India for improved nutrition, sustainability
A new study offers India a pathway to improve nutrition, climate resilience and the environment by diversifying its crop production. And it also offers global insights into the need to consider sustainable approaches to agriculture. (2019-12-18)

Research provides new design principle for water-splitting catalysts
Understanding why platinum is such a good catalyst for producing hydrogen from water could lead to new and cheaper catalysts -- and could ultimately make more hydrogen available for fossil-free fuels and chemicals. (2019-12-18)

Seasonal forecasts challenged by Pacific Ocean warming
Research has found global warming will make it more difficult to predict multi-year global climate variations, a consequence of changes to long-term climate variability patterns in the Pacific Ocean. (2019-12-17)

Plant-eating insects disrupt ecosystems and contribute to climate change
A new study from Lund University in Sweden shows that plant-eating insects affect forest ecosystems considerably more than previously thought. Among other things, the insects are a factor in the leaching of nutrients from soil and increased emissions of carbon dioxide. The researchers also establish that the temperature may rise as a result of an increase in the amount of plant-eating insects in some regions. (2019-12-17)

Effects of natural gas assessed in study of shale gas boom in Appalachian basin
A new study estimated the cumulative effects of the shale gas boom in the Appalachian basin in the early 2000s on air quality, climate change, and employment. The study found that effects on air quality and employment followed the boom-and-bust cycle, but effects on climate change will likely persist for generations to come. The study, which also considered how to compensate for these effects, provides insights for long-term decision making in this field. (2019-12-17)

New discovery about harmful particles: 'A fundamental shortcoming in air pollution models'
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered a surprising phenomenon in a process by which certain gas molecules produce harmful particles. The impact of this phenomenon is likely to increase in urban areas as pollution decreases. This knowledge can serve to help politicians adopt better measures to combat air pollution and contribute to improve climate models. (2019-12-17)

NREL, Co-Optima research yields potential bioblendstock for diesel fuel
The NREL scientists, along with colleagues at Yale University, Argonne National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, are part of the Department of Energy's Co-Optimization of Fuels & Engines (Co-Optima) initiative. Co-Optima's research focuses on improving fuel economy and vehicle performance while also reducing emissions. (2019-12-17)

The uncertain role of natural gas in the transition to clean energy
A new MIT study examines the opposing roles of natural gas in the battle against climate change -- as a bridge toward a lower-emissions future, but also a contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. (2019-12-16)

Barrels of ancient Antarctic air aim to track history of rare gas
An Antarctic field campaign last winter led by the US and Australia has successfully extracted some of the largest samples of air dating from the 1870s until today. Researchers will use the samples to look for changes in the molecules that scrub the atmosphere of methane and other gases. (2019-12-13)

Colliding molecules and antiparticles
A study by Marcos Barp and Felipe Arretche from Brazil published in EPJ D shows a model of the interaction between positrons and simple molecules that is in good agreement with experimental results. (2019-12-13)

One-third of recent global methane increase comes from tropical Africa
One-third of recent global methane increase comes from tropical Africa. (2019-12-11)

Pathways toward post-petrochemistry
Ethylene, or ethene, is a primary feedstock for the chemical industry, including as a starting material for the production of a wide variety of plastics. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now introduced a new electrochemical technique for selective and energy-efficient production of ethylene from carbon monoxide, which can be obtained from renewable resources and waste. (2019-12-11)

New material design tops carbon-capture from wet flue gases
Chemical engineers at EPFL have designed a material that can capture carbon dioxide from wet flue gasses better than current commercial materials. The work is published in Nature. (2019-12-11)

Scrubbing carbon dioxide from smokestacks for cleaner industrial emissions
An international collaboration co-led by an Oregon State University chemistry researcher has uncovered a better way to scrub carbon dioxide from smokestack emissions, which could be a key to mitigating global climate change. (2019-12-11)

State of shock: 200-year-old law about gas mixtures called into question
According to a new study led by a team from The University of New Mexico, centuries-old laws about the behavior of gas mixtures do not apply in the presence of shock waves. This finding could have potential impact on everything that involves mixtures of gases exposed to a shock wave, for example, during combustion in an engine. (2019-12-11)

Improving the accuracy of climate model projections with emergent constraints
Emergent constraints are useful for narrowing the spread of climate projections and for guiding the development of more realistic climate models. However, they are sensitive to various factors, such as the way statistical inference has been performed or how observational uncertainties have been obtained. Therefore, more consistency across emergent constraints are needed for better cross-validation of more likely projections. (2019-12-10)

Technologies and scientific advances needed to track methane levels in atmosphere
Understanding what influences the amount of methane in the atmosphere has been identified by the American Geophysical Union to be one of the foremost challenges in the earth sciences in the coming decades because of methane's hugely important role in meeting climate warming targets. (2019-12-10)

Have your health and eat meat too
Barbecued, stir-fried or roasted, there's no doubt that Aussies love their meat. Consuming on average nearly 100 kilograms of meat per person per year, Australians are among the top meat consumers worldwide. But with statistics showing that most Australians suffer from a poor diet, and red meat production adding to greenhouse-gas emissions, finding a balance between taste preferences, environmental protection, and health benefits is becoming critical. (2019-12-09)

Urban growth causes more biodiversity loss outside of cities
In a rapidly urbanizing world, the conversion of natural habitats into urban areas leads to a significant loss of biodiversity in cities. However, these direct effects of urban growth seem to be much smaller than the indirect effects outside of cities. (2019-12-09)

Tackling air pollution: researchers present emissions inventory for Nepal
Data on emission amounts and sources have an important role to play in shaping policy on climate protection and air quality. Now, scientists from the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Potsdam, Germany, have presented the first high-resolution inventory to record emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants in Nepal over an extended period of time. Their research reveals that the air pollution problem is growing at a much faster rate than the economy. (2019-12-09)

Researchers find some forests crucial for climate change mitigation, biodiversity
Researchers have identified forests in the western United States that should be preserved for their potential to mitigate climate change through carbon sequestration, as well as to enhance biodiversity. (2019-12-09)

Research shows ramping up carbon capture could be key to mitigating climate change
As the world gathers in Madrid to discuss how to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to fight climate change, a newly released study makes the case that trapping emissions underground could go a long way toward solving the problem. (2019-12-09)

How saving the ozone layer in 1987 slowed global warming
It may have been an accidental side effect but new research shows that when the world's nations signed the Montreal Protocol in 1987 to ban CFCs and save the ozone layer they also signed an agreement that has already done more to slow global warming than the Kyoto Protocol. (2019-12-06)

Carbon emissions from volcanic rocks can create global warming -- study
Greenhouse gas emissions released directly from the movement of volcanic rocks are capable of creating massive global warming effects -- a discovery which could transform the way scientists predict climate change, a new study reveals. (2019-12-05)

Graphene takes off in composites for planes and cars
The Graphene Flagship brought together top European researchers and companies to discuss the most disruptive ways graphene could enhance composites used in the aerospace, automotive and energy industries. (2019-12-05)

Recycling nutrient-rich industrial waste products enhances soil, reduces carbon
Recycling biotechnology byproducts can enhance soil health while reducing carbon emissions and maintaining crop yields. (2019-12-05)

Gulf Coast corals face catastrophe
Gulf of Mexico coral reefs may only be saved by a dramatic reduction in greenhouse gas emissions beyond those called for in the Paris Agreement, according to Rice University-led research. (2019-12-05)

Cooking practices during pregnancy may affect hyperactivity in children
In pregnant women, exposure to cooking fumes was related to an increased risk of their children having hyperactivity behaviors at the age of 3 years. The findings come from an Indoor Air study of 45,518 mothers of children who were newly enrolled in school in Shenzhen, China, from 2015 to 2017. (2019-12-04)

Water was a winner in capturing CO2
Reducing the level of CO2 in the atmosphere will almost certainly require carbon capture. A surprising substance just might be the ticket. (2019-12-04)

Study shows lake methane emissions should prompt rethink on climate change
Study sheds new light on the impact of natural methane production on global climate change assessments. (2019-12-04)

Atmospheric chemists move indoors
Most people spend the majority of their time at home, yet little is known about the air they breathe inside their houses. That's why some atmospheric chemists are turning their attention toward indoor air, using tools developed for monitoring pollutants outside. By cataloguing compounds in indoor air, scientists could someday link them with health effects, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (2019-12-04)

Less rice, more nutritious crops will enhance India's food supply
India can sustainably enhance its food supply if its farmers plant less rice and more nutritious and environmentally-friendly crops, including finger millet, pearl millet, and sorghum, according to a new study from the Data Science Institute at Columbia University. (2019-12-04)

Gulf of Mexico coral reefs to protect from storm surge in the future -- But will they?
LSU researcher Kristine DeLong uses 120,000-year-old fossils to predict how Gulf of Mexico coral reefs will respond to climate change toward the end of this century. (2019-12-04)

Russia's nuclear industry set to fight the climate crisis by exporting education
Challenges and perspectives for Russia's nuclear industry on its way to assuming a key role in the global fight against the climate crisis, while also ensuring future growth and building on 65 years of prodigious legacy, dating back to the launch of the world's first nuclear power plant in Obninsk in 1954, are brought together in a paper recently published in the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI openly accessible journal Nuclear Energy and Technology. (2019-12-03)

How the strep bacterium hides from the immune system
A bacterial pathogen that causes strep throat and other illnesses cloaks itself in fragments of red blood cells to evade detection by the host immune system, according to a study publishing December 3 in the journal Cell Reports. The researchers found that Group A Streptococcus (GAS) produces a previously uncharacterized protein, named S protein, which binds to the red blood cell membrane to avoid being engulfed and destroyed by phagocytic immune cells. (2019-12-03)

Co-combustion of wood and oil-shale reduces carbon emissions
Utilization of fossil fuels, which represents an increasing environmental risk, can be made more environmentally friendly by adding wood -- as concluded based on the preliminary results of the year-long study carried out by thermal engineers of Tallinn University of Technology. In search of less polluting ways of energy production, increasing the amount of biomass as a source of raw materials offers a good way to use fossil fuels and reduce emissions. (2019-12-03)

Gas giant composition not determined by host star
A surprising analysis of the composition of gas giant exoplanets and their host stars shows that there isn't a strong correlation between their compositions when it comes to elements heavier than hydrogen and helium, according to new work led by Carnegie's Johanna Teske. This finding has important implications for our understanding of the planetary formation process. (2019-12-03)

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