Current Guilt News and Events

Current Guilt News and Events, Guilt News Articles.
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Health survey conveys messages on how we should live
The questions in a health survey aimed at young people raise issues of status and convey norms about what people should own and how they should be. This is according to a study from Linköping University. The results have been published in the journal Children & Society. (2021-02-16)

New study strengthens claims Richard III murdered 'the Princes in the Tower
King Richard III's involvement in one of the most notorious and emotive mysteries in English history may be a step closer to being confirmed following a new study by Professor Tim Thornton of the University of Huddersfield. (2021-02-01)

Doctors should change the way that they ask patients about self-harm and suicide
Doctors can better help patients with mental health concerns by adopting a different questioning style around self-harm and suicide, experts have said. (2020-12-21)

Why obeying orders can make us do terrible things
War atrocities are sometimes committed by 'normal' people obeying orders. Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience measured brain activity while participants inflicted pain and found that obeying orders reduced empathy and guilt related brain activity for the inflicted pain. This may explain why people are able to commit immoral acts under coercion. (2020-08-21)

Fitness watches generate useful information, but increase patient anxiety
How does measuring our sleep, exercise and heart rates using various apps and fitness watches affect us? Self-quantifying may better the understanding of our individual health, but according to a new study, it also gives rise to anxiety. The researchers have examined the experiences of fitness watch wearing patients with chronic heart problems. (2020-08-04)

Traits associated with increased risk of gun use among high-risk adolescents
Research out today identifies traits among high-risk adolescents associated with increased risk for gun use. Among high-risk adolescents, those with greater callous-unemotional traits were more likely to carry a gun and to use a gun during a crime over a four-year period following an initial arrest, according to a study published online in the American Journal of Psychiatry. (2020-06-16)

Cultivating cooperation through kinship
Extensive cooperation among biologically unrelated individuals is uniquely human. It would be surprising if this uniqueness were not related to other uniquely human characteristics, yet current theories of human cooperation tend to ignore the human aspects of human behavior. This paper presents a theory of cooperation that draws on social, cultural, and psychological aspects of human uniqueness for which current theories have little or no explanation. (2020-04-30)

Trust in humans and robots: Economically similar but emotionally different
In research published in the Journal of Economic Psychology, scientists explore whether people trust robots as they do fellow humans. These interactions are important to understand because trust-based interactions with robots are increasingly common in the marketplace, workplace, on the road and in the home. Results show people extend trust similarly to humans and robots but people's emotional reactions in trust-based interactions vary depending on partner type. (2020-04-16)

Many women vets report adverse pregnancy outcomes, postpartum mental health problems after leaving military service
Women Veterans with more symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or moral injury (guilt, shame or demoralization in response to participating in or witnessing events that violate one's sense of right and wrong), are at greater risk for negative pregnancy outcomes and postpartum depression in the three years following discharge from military service. (2020-04-15)

Skin-to-skin contact do not improve interaction between mother and preterm infant
Following a premature birth it is important that the parents and the infant quickly establish a good relationship. Researchers at Linköping University have studied the relationship between mothers and infants who have continuous skin-to-skin contact during the entire period from birth to discharge from the hospital. The results show that continuous skin-to-skin contact does not lead to better interaction between the mother and the infant. The study is published in the scientific journal Advances in Neonatal Care. (2020-01-23)

Pretrial publicity hinders prosecutors' ability to prove guilt
Study finds media coverage is more likely to influence jurors to vote for acquittal than for conviction. (2020-01-08)

Probiotic may help treat colic in infants
Probiotics -- or 'good bacteria' -- have been used to treat infant colic with varying success. In a new trial published in the journal Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, investigators have shown that drops containing a particular probiotic strain (Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12) reduced the duration of daily crying by more than 50% in 80% of the 40 infants who received the probiotic once daily for 28 days, with beneficial effects on sleep duration and on stool frequency and consistency. (2019-12-04)

How to boost sales of fair trade and sustainable goods
When consumers are given responsibility for whether a product is produced, a stronger link develops between consumers and production that leads to anticipated feelings of guilt or gratification depending on the ethicality of the production process, which then influences purchase intentions. (2019-12-04)

Men who receive home care from spouse more likely to feel burdensome than women
A spouse requiring caregiving for chronic illness or a disability can create a stressful environment for married couples. (2019-11-11)

Narcissism can lower stress levels and reduce chances of depression
People who have grandiose narcissistic traits are more likely to be 'mentally tough,' feel less stressed and are less vulnerable to depression, research led by Queen's University Belfast has found. (2019-10-29)

Neurofeedback increases self-esteem by rebalancing brain circuits in depression
A study published in the journal Neuroimage: Clinical found that patients with Major Depressive Disorder, who had recovered from symptoms, were able to strengthen some of their brain connections, thereby increasing their self-esteem. The research showed that connectivity between certain brain regions - previously found to be decreased when feeling guilt in people with a history of depression - could be strengthened in a single session of neurofeedback training through functional magnetic resonance imaging. (2019-10-10)

A study of educational sabotage
A study published in the journal Violence Against Women by a domestic violence expert at The University of Texas at Arlington focuses on an overlooked form of psychological abuse -- educational sabotage. Educational sabotage is a form of coercive control that directly affects a survivor's efforts to obtain educational credentials, said Rachel Voth Schrag, assistant professor in the School of Social Work. Tactics include disruption of financial aid or academic efforts, physical violence and inducing guilt related to academic efforts. (2019-10-02)

McLean successfully integrates spirituality and religion with mental health treatment
McLean Hospital clinicians describe the success of the hospital's Spiritual Psychotherapy for Inpatient, Residential & Intensive Treatment (SPIRIT) program. (2019-09-19)

75% of asthma sufferers unable to work to their full potential
A new multi-national survey has revealed that asthma sufferers are missing nearly one-tenth of work hours due to their symptoms, which also results in a loss of productivity and affects their emotional wellbeing. (2019-07-30)

Survivors' near-miss experiences on 9/11 linked to post-traumatic stress
People who narrowly avoid disaster do not necessarily escape tragedy unharmed, and their knowledge of the victims' fate shapes how survivors respond to traumatic events, according to the results of a new paper by a UB psychologist that explores the effects of near-miss experiences associated with the 9/11 terrorist attacks. (2019-07-11)

To cheat or not to cheat? Researchers uncover the moral dilemmas of doping
Elite athletes are less likely to take banned substances if they consider the morality of what they are doing, and not just the health consequences of doping, according to a new study led by the University of Birmingham and funded by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). (2019-05-09)

Responding to extremist attacks: For Muslim leaders, 'It's damned if you do, damned if you don't'
Muslim leaders face a perilous task when asked to publicly respond to violent attacks carried out by Muslim extremists. (2019-04-30)

Schadenfreude: Your pain is my gain
If someone in the workplace is mistreated, their colleagues may respond with empathy -- or with schadenfreude. The latter emotion, according to a new study by the University of Zurich, occurs primarily in highly competitive working environments, when one person's misfortune facilitates another's goals. Even worse, schadenfreude can be contagious. For this reason, it is worth establishing an inclusive working climate and team-based incentives. (2019-04-24)

How do we make moral decisions?
When it comes to making moral decisions, we often think of the golden rule: do unto others as you would have them do unto you. Yet, why we make such decisions has been widely debated. Are we motivated by feelings of guilt or fairness? Some people may rely on principles of both guilt and fairness and may switch their moral rule depending on the circumstances, according to a Radboud University -- Dartmouth College study on moral decision-making and cooperation. (2019-04-18)

Brain wiring differences identified in children with conduct disorder
Behavioural problems in young people with severe antisocial behaviour -- known as conduct disorder -- could be caused by differences in the brain's wiring that link the brain's emotional centres together, according to new research led by the University of Birmingham. (2019-04-18)

Defining the emotional bond forced onto teen victims of sex trafficking
Rutgers researchers have defined the relationship that forms between children who are sold for sex and the criminals who traffic them. The discovery should make it easier for law enforcement and healthcare providers to identify child victims, rescue them and help them reenter society. (2019-04-04)

Parental support linked to how well millennials transition to college life
Researchers show that how well parents or guardians support millennials' psychological needs prior to their transition to college is an important predictor of their psychological well-being as they adapt to college life. (2019-03-26)

Men's porn habits could fuel partners' eating disorders, study suggests
A woman whose boyfriend or husband regularly watches pornography is more likely to report symptoms of an eating disorder, new research suggests. In addition to finding an association between a partner's porn habits and eating disorder symptoms, the research also found a higher incidence of those symptoms in women who said they feel pressure from their boyfriends or husbands to be thin. (2019-02-14)

Shameful secrets bother us more than guilty secrets
Everyone has secrets, but what causes someone to think about them over and over again? People who feel shame about a secret, as opposed to guilt, are more likely to be consumed by thoughts of what they are hiding, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2019-02-11)

Medically assisted reproduction does not raise risk of preterm birth and low birth weight
Study shows that couples can decide about using medically assisted reproduction free from concerns about increasing the health risks to their baby. (2019-01-14)

Study sheds light on alcohol misuse among never-deployed reservists
In a study of 174 Army Reserve and National Guard soldiers who hadn't been deployed, University at Buffalo researchers found that more negative non-deployment emotions were associated with a range of alcohol use outcomes. (2018-11-30)

Study advocates psychological screening for the carers of child burn victims
A new study published in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology highlights the need for psychological screening for families/primary caregivers after a child sustains a burn injury. (2018-11-06)

Severity of crime increases jury's belief in guilt
A laboratory experiment with 600 mock jurors has found the more severe an alleged crime, the higher a juror's confidence in guilt becomes, regardless of the evidence. 'If the crime is more serious or more heinous, [mock jurors] are more likely to be convinced by the same amount of evidence,' said lead study author John Pearson of Duke University. (2018-10-29)

Loss of first baby tooth a positive experience for children
Scared, ashamed, happy or proud -- how do children feel when they lose their first baby tooth? An interdisciplinary research group at the University of Zurich has now found that children's feelings are predominantly positive. The study also reveals that previous visits to the dentist's as well as parental background and level of education affect how children experience the loss of their first tooth. (2018-10-24)

Psychopaths in the C-Suite?
The seemingly never-ending stream of corporate scandals over the past decades, from Enron to Theranos, suggests that something is rotten in corporate leaders. Many place the blame on psychopaths, who are characteristically superficially charming but lack empathy, anxiety, or any sense of blame or guilt. (2018-10-15)

Study examines how heartfelt guilt affects individuals
For thousands of years, people have closely associated moral cleanliness with acts of physical cleanliness. A recent study published in the Australian Journal of Psychology explored this association by eliciting guilt, a threat to one's moral purity. (2018-09-19)

Are you prone to feeling guilty? Then you're probably more trustworthy, study shows
New research from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business finds that when it comes to predicting who is most likely to act in a trustworthy manner, one of the most important factors is the anticipation of guilt. (2018-07-19)

Ex-smokers crave lost identity, study shows
Ex-smokers may not be able to resist lighting up again in order to recover a sense of 'who they are' -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia. New findings published today in the Journal of Substance Use suggest that smokers who have quit often relapse because they want to recapture a sense of lost social identity. And that many ex-smokers experience quitting as a 'loss'. (2018-07-05)

Genetic ancestry test users 'cherry-pick' which races to identify with
Genetic ancestry tests are often advertised as a tool to uncover new connections to diverse cultures and ancestries, but new research from the University of British Columbia has found people tend to pick and choose which races they identify with based on preconceived biases. (2018-06-28)

Intervention shows promise for treating depression in preschool-aged children
Children as young as 3-years-old can be diagnosed with clinical depression. Although young children are sometimes prescribed antidepressants, a psychotherapeutic intervention is needed. Researchers adapted Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), (a validated treatment for disruptive behavioral disorders in children), by adding new emotional development content. PCIT-ED treatment resulted in significant improvements in depression for both children and their parents, suggesting PCIT-ED as a powerful and low-risk approach to the treatment of preschool depression. (2018-06-20)

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