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Current Gum Disease News and Events, Gum Disease News Articles.
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Gene therapy success in chronic septic granulomatosis
American and British teams published yesterday in Nature Medicine the conclusive results of a gene therapy trial conducted in the United States and Great Britain in 9 patients with X-linked Chronic Septic Granulomatosis (X-CGD), a rare and severe immune dysfunction. Genethon, which contributed to the research that led to these trials and sponsored initial clinical studies, is pleased with these results. (2020-01-28)

Why eating yogurt may help lessen the risk of breast cancer
One of the causes of breast cancer may be inflammation triggered by harmful bacteria suggest researchers. Scientists advise consuming natural yogurt, which contains beneficial bacteria which dampens inflammation and which is similar to the bacteria found in breastfeeding mothers. Their suggestion is that this bacteria is protective because breast feeding reduces the risk of breast cancer. The consumption of yogurt is also associated with a reduction in the risk of breast cancer. (2020-01-24)

Scurvy is still a thing in Canada
McMaster University researchers surveyed the data of patients of Hamilton's two hospital systems over nine years and found 52 with low Vitamin C levels. This included 13 patients who could be diagnosed as having scurvy, and an additional 39 who tested positive for scurvy but did not have documented symptoms. (2020-01-17)

Researchers suggest a pathway to reverse the genetic defect of Friedreich's ataxia
Scientists have identified a molecular mechanism that could reverse the genetic defect responsible for Friedreich's ataxia, a neurodegenerative disease that leaves its victims with difficulty walking, a loss of sensation in the arms and legs and impaired speech. The researchers discovered that the genetic anomaly that causes the disease -- the multiple repetition of a three letter DNA sequence -- could potentially be reversed by enhancing a natural process that contracts the repetitive sequences in living tissue. (2020-01-06)

Ancient 'chewing gum' yields insights into people and bacteria of the past
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have succeeded in extracting a complete human genome from a thousands-of-years old 'chewing gum.' According to the researchers, it is a new untapped source of ancient DNA. (2019-12-17)

New study explores the link between obesity and gum disease
Obesity and gum (periodontal) disease are among the most common non-communicable diseases in the United States -- and studies show these chronic conditions may be related. This new study explores the effect of obesity on non-surgical periodontal care and evaluates potential pathways that may illustrate the connection between the two conditions. (2019-12-03)

NASA-NOAA satellite analyzes a strengthening Typhoon Kammuri
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with infrared and nighttime views of Typhoon Kammuri that showed the storm continued to strengthen. Satellite imagery provided a look at the clouds and storms over the storm's developing eye. (2019-11-29)

NASA-NOAA satellite finds tropical storm Kammuri strengthening
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Storm Kammuri in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and found several areas of very strong thunderstorms. (2019-11-27)

Satellite tracking Guam's Tropical Storm Kammuri
The National Weather Service in Guam has posted warnings as Tropical Storm Kammuri lingers nearby. The NOAA-20 satellite provided forecasters with an image of the storm. (2019-11-26)

Chewing sugar-free gum could help reduce tooth decay, a new review finds
A systematic review by King's College London has found some evidence that chewing sugar-free gum could help to reduce the further development of dental caries (cavities) in adults and children. (2019-11-19)

NASA finds heavy rain in Tropical Storm Fengshen
The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite provided a look at the rainfall occurring within the newly developed Tropical Storm Fengshen. (2019-11-12)

Oral health for older adults
Practicing good oral hygiene, using fluoride treatments, and getting regular dental care reduces oral infections and their complications. A recent article published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society offers a helpful overview of oral health for older adults, as well as tips for keeping your teeth and mouth in tip-top shape. Highlights from the article are summarized here. (2019-11-08)

NASA-NOAA satellite finds super typhoon Halong finally weakening
Super Typhoon Halong has finally peaked in intensity and is now on a weakening trend. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and provided a look at the storm. (2019-11-06)

AI reveals nature of RNA-protein interactions
A deep learning tool could help in structure-based drug discovery. (2019-10-30)

Soft drinks found to be the crucial link between obesity and tooth wear
A new study published today in the journal Clinical Oral Investigations, has found that sugar-sweetened acidic drinks, such as soft drinks, is the common factor between obesity and tooth wear among adults. (2019-10-27)

NASA analysis shows heavy rain in Typhoon Bualoi
Typhoon Bualoi continues to move through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite measured rainfall rates throughout the storm. (2019-10-23)

NASA finds heavy rain potential in typhoon Bualoi over Marianas
Typhoon Bualoi was lashing the Marianas Islands in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and analyzed the cloud top temperatures to give forecasters insight into the storm's rain potential. (2019-10-22)

NASA finds Typhoon Bualoi rapidly intensified
Typhoon Bualoi rapidly intensified over 24 hours and quickly developed an eye and powerful thunderstorms. (2019-10-21)

Sentinels in the mouth
Newly discovered chemical-sensing cells in the gums protect the mouth by standing guard against infections that damage soft tissue and destroy the bone that supports the teeth. With the help of bitter taste receptors that also detect byproducts from harmful bacteria, these special gum cells trigger the immune system to control the amount and type of bacteria in the mouth and could one day lead to personalized dental treatments against gum disease. (2019-10-03)

As we age, oral health plays increasing role in overall health
The need is evident, say the authors. Data from the National Center for Health Statistics indicates that the prevalence of cavities is more than twice as high in older adults than younger adults. (2019-09-26)

Gum disease linked with higher risk of hypertension
People with gum disease (periodontitis) have a greater likelihood of high blood pressure (hypertension), according to a study published today in Cardiovascular Research, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). (2019-09-24)

Big game hunting for a more versatile catalyst
For the first time, researchers at Harvard University and Cornell University have discovered exactly how a reactive copper-nitrene catalyst works, a finding that could revolutionize how chemical industries produce everything from pharmaceuticals to household goods. In a paper in Science, the team describes how the catalyst performs its magic and how to bottle the tool to break stubborn carbon-hydrogen bonds and make products like solvents, detergents, and dyes with less waste, energy, and cost. (2019-09-12)

Acute periodontal disease bacteria love colon and dirt microbes
Mythbuster: The idea that bacterial collaborations within microbiomes, like in the mouth, have evolved to be generous and exclusive very much appears to be wrong. In an extensive experiment, lavish collaborations ensued between random microbes. And some bacteria from the same microbiome were stingy with one another. (2019-09-09)

Poor oral health linked to cognitive decline, perceived stress, Rutgers studies find
Two Rutgers studies explore the relationship between poor oral health and cognitive decline and the effects of perceived stress and social support on dry mouth among older Chinese Americans. (2019-09-04)

Scientists uncover key new molecules that could help to tackle tooth loss and regeneration
New research published in the Journal of Dental Research has shed light on the science behind the formation of the periodontal ligament, which helps keep the tooth stable in the jawbone. This improved understanding will help scientists work towards regenerating the tissues that support teeth. This is a peer-reviewed, observational study conducted in rodent teeth and human cells. (2019-08-30)

Chewing gum use in the perioperative period
Many anesthesiologists forbid patients from chewing gum in the immediate hours before surgery for fear that it would increase the risk that the patient's stomach contents might end up dumped (aspirated) into the patient's lungs, with potentially deadly consequences (aspiration pneumonitis). (2019-08-30)

Elite athletes have poor oral health despite brushing twice daily
Elite athletes have high rates of oral disease despite brushing their teeth more frequently than most people, finds a new UCL study published in the British Dental Journal. (2019-08-23)

Poo transplants to help save koalas
Poo transplants are helping expand koala microbiomes, allowing the marsupials to eat a wider range of eucalypts and possibly survive habitat loss. A study featuring University of Queensland researchers has analysed and altered microbes in koalas' guts, finding that a faecal transplant may influence what species of eucalypt koalas can feed on. (2019-08-20)

Daily e-cigarette use may help smokers quit regular cigarettes
New study from the Massachusetts General Hospital's Tobacco Research and Treatment Center provides critical evidence demonstrating that using e-cigarettes daily helps U.S. smokers to quit traditional cigarettes. (2019-07-23)

The Lancet: Big Sugar and neglect by global health community fuel oral health crisis
Oral health has been isolated from traditional healthcare and health policy for too long, despite the major global public health burden of oral diseases, according to a Lancet Series on Oral Health, published today in The Lancet. Failure of the global health community to prioritise the global burden of oral health has led to calls from Lancet Series authors for the radical reform of dental care, tightened regulation of the sugar industry, and greater transparency around conflict of interests in dental research. (2019-07-18)

Radical reform needed to address dental decay worldwide
Tooth decay, gum disease and oral cancers are a major health burden worldwide, but are largely ignored by the global health community, according to a series on oral health in The Lancet that publishes July 20, 2019. In a commentary accompanying the series, Cristin Kearns and Lisa Bero express growing concern that the dental profession will not make meaningful progress in combating the oral health epidemic until it addresses the sugar industry's influence on dental research. (2019-07-18)

Lancet series, co-authored by NYU's Benzian, calls for 'radical reform' of oral healthcare
A special Lancet Series on Oral Health, published today in The Lancet, presents an 'urgent need for radical reform' of oral healthcare to prioritize prevention and integrate dentistry into primary care. The series is comprised of two papers, both co-authored by Habib Benzian, D.D.S., MScD.P.H., Ph.D., the associate director of global health and policy for NYU College of Dentistry's World Health Organization (WHO) Collaborating Center for Quality-improvement, Evidence-based Dentistry -- the only WHO Collaborating Center on oral health in the Americas. (2019-07-18)

Root canal work not so bad after all
Root canal work is not as bad as people think when compared to other dental procedures. Self-reporting of their dental health suggests that patients find the procedure no worse than other dental work which overturns the popular belief that root canal work is the most unpleasant dental treatment. (2019-07-12)

Are you sure it's burning mouth syndrome?
Not all burning mouths are the result of a medical condition known as 'burning mouth syndrome' (BMS) and physicians and researchers need better standards for an appropriate diagnosis, according to new research at the School of Dental Medicine at Case Western Reserve University. (2019-07-03)

Brush your teeth -- postpone Alzheimer's
Researchers at the University of Bergen in Norway have discovered a clear connection between oral health and Alzheimer┬┤s disease. (2019-06-03)

Common food additive found to affect gut microbiota
Experts call for better regulation of a common additive in foods and medicine, as research reveals it can impact the gut microbiota and contribute to inflammation in the colon, which could trigger diseases such as inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer. (2019-05-13)

Study reveals link between starch digestion gene, gut bacteria
A newly discovered relationship between genetic variation and the gut microbiome could help nutritionists personalize their recommendations. People with a high number of copies of a gene called AMY1, which expresses a salivary enzyme for breaking down starch, correlated strongly with a certain profile of gut and mouth bacteria, according to a new Cornell University study. (2019-05-02)

New Cochrane Review investigates the effectiveness of nicotine replacement therapy
New evidence published in the Cochrane Library provides high quality evidence that people who use a combination of nicotine replacement therapies (a patch plus a short acting form, such as gum or lozenge) are more likely to successfully quit smoking than people who use a single form of the medicine. (2019-04-23)

Alerting patients to their risk of gum disease improves inflammation and dental hygiene
In a new study published today in the Journal of Periodontology researchers found that using psychological techniques to communicate the risk of developing periodontal disease to patients improved dental hygiene over a three month period. (2019-04-17)

Sniffing pleasant odors may decrease cigarette craving
Smokers who are trying to quit may not always have to reach for a piece of nicotine gum to stave off a craving. Deliberately inhaling a pleasant aroma may be enough to reduce the urge to light up, at least temporarily, and could be used as part of an effective smoking cessation strategy, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2019-04-15)

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