Current Harassment News and Events | Page 2

Current Harassment News and Events, Harassment News Articles.
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How personality predicts seeing others as sex objects
Several personality traits related to psychopathy -- especially being openly antagonistic -- predict a tendency to view others as merely sex objects, finds a study by psychologists at Emory University. (2020-01-27)

Women in leadership positions face more sexual harassment
Power in the workplace does not stop women's exposure to sexual harassment. On the contrary, women with supervisory positions are harassed more than women employees. These are the results from a new study from the Swedish Institute for Social Research at Stockholm University, which examined the conditions in Sweden, USA and Japan. (2020-01-16)

AI for #MeToo: Training algorithms to spot online trolls
Machine learning could be a powerful tool for allowing social media platforms to spot online trolls. (2020-01-08)

Progressive gender beliefs in teen boys may be protective against violence
Teenage boys who witness their peers abusing women and girls are much more likely to bully and fight with others, as well as behave abusively toward their dates, compared to teenage boys who don't witness such behaviors, according to a new analysis. Conversely, the study found that adolescents with more equitable gender attitudes -- those who felt boys and girls deserve equal opportunities and respect -- had lower odds of reporting violent behaviors. (2019-12-27)

Little reason for moral panicking after #MeToo
Men and women generally agree on what constitutes sexual harassment. (2019-12-18)

Donkeys are natural heat lovers and prefer Bethlehem to Britain
We might associate donkeys with Christmas, but new research from the University of Portsmouth shows the animals are keener on hotter periods of the year. Donkeys, it seems, love sun and warmth. That's the finding of the first study to examine the conditions under which healthy (non-working) donkeys and mules seek shelter in hot, dry climates. (2019-12-17)

Sexual harassment may be reduced at fun work events, study finds
The office holiday party loses its luster in light of new study findings from researchers at Penn State and Ohio State demonstrating that incidences of unwanted sexual attention are increased at these and other ''fun'' work events. This sexual harassment may be reduced, however, when these events are held during normal office hours, when attendance is optional and when employees are allowed to bring guests. (2019-12-17)

Study finds flirting among coworkers can reduce stress
Casual flirting with colleagues at work is relatively harmless and can even be beneficial, according to the study led by Washington State University Assistant Professor Leah Sheppard. The research focuses on the little studied area of positively experienced social sexual behavior, drawing a clear distinction between these interactions and the persistent, unwelcome acts of sexual harassment. (2019-12-16)

Most physicians and other faculty in large medical center experienced sexual harassment
A new study has shown that the majority of women (82.5%) and men (65.1%) working at an academic medical center reported at least one incident of sexual harassment by staff, students, and faculty during the previous year. (2019-11-18)

Vietnam-era women veterans continue to experience wartime stress
Vietnam-era women veterans suffer with stress-related mental health conditions, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depression and generalized anxiety disorder, more than four decades after their service. (2019-11-18)

Nearly half of accused harassers can return to work
What happens behind the scenes when employees are accused of harassment? New research from Michigan State University revealed that almost half of accused harassers can go back to work when disputes are settled by arbitrators -- or, third-parties who resolve disputes. (2019-11-14)

Scientists' panel urges vigorous prevention of sexual harassment and bias in labs
A diverse group of scientists including Nilanjana Dasgupta, professor of social psychology at UMass Amherst and the campus's director of faculty equity and inclusion, report their findings recently and recommendations on how institutions and funding agencies can address and prevent sexual harassment and gender bias in the STEM workforce. Details of their suggested ''specific, potentially high-impact policy changes'' appear in the current issue of Science. (2019-11-08)

Scientists take action to prevent sexual harassment and bias
In a policy paper published in the journal Science, scientists from a variety of fields highlight key ways institutions and funding agencies can help address sexual harassment and gender bias in the STEM workplace. (2019-11-07)

Too real, or too fake? Female Instagram influencers in 'authenticity bind'
Female Instagram influencers -- whose livelihoods depend on their numbers of followers, views and likes - endure criticism and harassment both for being too real and for seeming too fake, according to a new study from Cornell University. (2019-10-30)

Women surgical residents suffer more mistreatment, burnout, suicidal thoughts
Women surgical residents suffer more mistreatment than men, which leads to a higher burnout rate and more suicidal thoughts among female residents, reports a new study that surveyed trainees in all accredited 260 US general surgical residency programs. But when the study authors adjusted for the occurrence of mistreatment (discrimination, harassment, abuse), the rates of burnout were similar for men and women residents. The biggest driver of burnout was whether someone experienced discrimination, abuse or harassment. (2019-10-28)

Central Valley workplaces can be hostile for minority doctors
Despite the dire need for primary health care providers in California's Central Valley, workplace discrimination and harassment can cause them to change practices or leave the region entirely. (2019-10-23)

Sexual trauma common in postmenopausal women veterans
Thanks to increased media attention, sexual assaults occurring in the military are finally getting the attention they deserve. However, most reports involve reproductive-aged women Veterans from recent service eras. A new study confirms the problem has a long history with assaults linked to numerous mental and physical problems. Study results will be presented during The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) Annual Meeting in Chicago, Sept. 25 to 28, 2019. (2019-09-25)

Commit a crime? Loved ones got your back
Reading about a child abuse case or someone burglarizing homes often stirs feelings of disgust, anger and disbelief when it's learned the perpetrator's family or friends did nothing to stop it or report it to police. (2019-09-24)

New algorithm can distinguish cyberbullies from normal Twitter users with 90% accuracy
A team of researchers, including faculty at Binghamton University, have developed machine learning algorithms which can successfully identify bullies and aggressors on Twitter with 90 percent accuracy. (2019-09-16)

Youth: Transgender people should use bathroom they're most comfortable in
Young people clash with older adults when it comes to bathroom policies related to gender identity, a University of Michigan study suggests. (2019-08-28)

Empathy for perpetrators helps explain victim blaming in sexual harassment
Men's empathy for other men who sexually harass women may help explain why they are more likely to blame victims, new research suggests. (2019-08-18)

Early-career female physicians experience obstacles to professional and academic success
Individual and systemic challenges specific to female family physicians in their first five years of practice create obstacles that can result in disproportionate rates of burnout and negative impacts on career trajectories, according to a new paper co-authored by Dr. Tali Bogler of St. Michael's Hospital's Academic Family Health Team. (2019-08-14)

#MeToo media coverage sympathetic to but not necessarily empowering for women
The #MeToo movement has encouraged women to share their personal stories of sexual harassment. While the movement amplifies previously unheard voices, a Carnegie Mellon University analysis of #MeToo media coverage shows accusers are often portrayed as sympathetic, but with less power and agency than their alleged perpetrators. (2019-08-14)

Link between workplace sexual harassment and women's negative self-views may be weakening
A survey analysis suggests that, between 2016 and 2018, the relationship between workplace sexual harassment and women's negative self-views weakened. Ksenia Keplinger and colleagues at the Leeds School of Business at the University of Colorado Boulder, US, present these findings in the open access journal PLOS ONE on July 17, 2019. (2019-07-17)

Alcohol causes significant harm to those other than the drinker
Each year, one in five US adults -- an estimated 53 million people -- experience harm because of someone else's drinking, according to new research in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. (2019-07-01)

Viewing pornography increase unethical behavior at work
New research discovers employees who view pornography aren't just costing companies millions of dollars in wasted time, they're causing harm to the company. (2019-06-25)

Survey of dental researchers' perceptions of sexual harassment at AADR conferences
At the 97th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) and the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), AADR Immediate Past President Raul Garcia, Boston University, Massachusetts, USA, presented a poster on 'Survey of Dental Researchers' Perceptions of Sexual Harassment at AADR Conferences 2015-2018.' (2019-06-21)

The dynamics of workplace sexual harassment in the US
A new Gender, Work & Organization analysis of US data from 1997-2016 provides new insights into workplace sexual harassment. (2019-06-19)

Supportive families and schools help prevent substance use among trans youth: UBC study
Strong family and school connections are helping prevent transgender youth from smoking cigarettes and using marijuana, even among those targeted by violence. That's the key finding of a new national study led by researchers in the Stigma and Resilience Among Vulnerable Youth Centre in the school of nursing at the University of British Columbia. (2019-06-10)

Report finds California above national average for sexual harassment rates
A new study shows California sexual harassment rates above national average. (2019-05-23)

Prominently posted rules boost participation, cut harassment online
Clear behavioral rules posted prominently on online discussions can markedly increase participation while cutting harassment, new research from Princeton University has found. (2019-04-29)

Wakeup call: Pervasiveness of sexual harassment and its effect on female physics students
A recent study revealed that sexual harassment in physics is insidious and experienced at a significantly higher rate than is generally acknowledged. The study also found that gender harassment, one type of sexual harassment, is correlated with two harmful psychological patterns: a diminished sense of belonging and the imposter phenomenon. (2019-04-22)

PSU study finds that money, revenge, morals motivate whistleblowers to expose tax fraud
A study by Portland State University School of Business accounting professor Cass Hausserman finds that people who expose others of tax fraud often do so as revenge that's disguised as their moral obligation. Blowing the whistle is also motivated by a financial gain for the whistleblower. Revenge is commonly considered a primary reason why whistleblowers report tax fraud -- so much so, that it's often referred to as 'the revenge tax.' (2019-04-03)

Violence against long-term care staff 'normalized'
Violence against staff working in long-term care facilities -- including physical assault, verbal abuse and sexual harassment -- has become 'normalized', according to a new University of Stirling study. (2019-03-26)

A mating war in diving beetles has stopped the evolution of species
In nature, males eager attempts to mate with females can be so extreme that they will harm females. Such negative impact of mating interactions has been suggested to promote the emergence of new species under some circumstances. Surprisingly, one type of diving beetle species now show that this conflict between the sexes can instead lead to an evolutionary standstill in which mating enhancing traits in males and counter-adaptations in females prevent the formation of new species. (2019-03-20)

Current training of physicians to care for LGBTQ individuals is falling short
Not enough is being done to prepare physicians to care for the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) patients. Better physician training on their unique clinical needs may eliminate many of the health disparities among this growing segment of the population according to a new study. (2019-03-15)

Race, gender and age affect who writes majority opinions for state supreme courts
FINDINGS: Female justices are more likely to be assigned to write an opinion in general, but they are less likely to be selected to write the opinion if a case is considered complex. Both female and black justices are less likely to be selected to write the majority opinion as they get older while their non-minority male peers are selected for this task at higher rates with advancing age (2019-03-13)

75 science societies urge the education department to base Title IX sexual harassment regulations on evidence and science
The American Educational Research Association (AERA) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) today led 75 scientific societies in submitting comments on the US Department of Education's proposed changes to Title IX regulations. (2019-01-30)

Youth with disabilities have increased risk for technology-involved peer harassment
New research from the University of New Hampshire finds that while youths with disabilities, mental health diagnoses and special education services experience peer harassment or bullying at similar rates as other youth, understanding differences in how they experience it may lead to solutions that minimize risk to all youth. (2019-01-22)

Millions of Google searches for sexual harassment, assault since #MeToo
An estimated 40 to 54 million Google searches for sexual harassment and assault were recorded in the United States in the eight months after public accusations against film producer Harvey Weinstein and the ensuing #MeToo movement. Searches related to reporting and preventing such actions also were up based on the results of a study that monitored and analyzed search activity. (2018-12-21)

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