Current Harsh World News and Events

Current Harsh World News and Events, Harsh World News Articles.
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Wet and wild: There's lots of water in the world's most explosive volcano
Conditions inside the Shiveluch volcano include roughly 10%-14% water by weight (wt%), according to research from Washington University in St. Louis. Most volcanoes have less than 1% water. For subduction zone volcanoes, the average is usually 4%, rarely exceeding 8 wt%, which is considered superhydrous. (2021-01-22)

Moffitt researchers identify how cancer cells adapt to survive harsh tumor microenvironments
To better understand the conditions that select for the Warburg Effect and the mechanisms where cells can express this metabolic adaptation, Moffitt researchers subjected nonmalignant cells to the harsh tumor microenvironment that is present during early carcinogenesis, known as ductal carcinoma in situ. In a new research article published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the Moffitt team shows that these conditions select for cells to express a Warburg Effect. (2021-01-19)

Liquid metal ink liberates form
POSTECH-Yonsei University joint research team develops liquid metal ink for 3D circuit lines. (2021-01-10)

Archaeology: sharing leftover meat may have contributed to early dog domestication
Humans feeding leftover lean meat to wolves during harsh winters may have had a role in the early domestication of dogs, towards the end of the last ice age (14,000 to 29,000 years ago), according to a study published in Scientific Reports. (2021-01-07)

Cancer cells hibernate like bears to evade harsh chemotherapy
Dr. Catherine O'Brien's study is the first to identify that cancer cells hijack an evolutionary conserved program to survive chemotherapy. Furthermore, the researchers show that novel therapeutic strategies aimed at specifically targeting cancer cells in this slow-dividing state can prevent cancer regrowth. (2021-01-07)

New bacterial culture methods could result in the discovery of new species
A new microbial study explored the bacterial diversity of the Tabernas Desert located in the south-eastern Spain. Using simple tweaks of the traditional bacterial culture methods, the researchers isolated more than 250 bacterial strains of which 80 could be possible new bacteria species. (2021-01-05)

Christmas trees can be green because of a photosynthetic short-cut
How can conifers that are used for example as Christmas trees keep their green needles over the boreal winter when most trees shed their leaves? Science has not provided a good answer to this question but now an international team of scientists, including researchers from Umeå University, has deciphered that a short-cut in the photosynthetic machinery allows the needles of pine trees to stay green. The study was published in the journal Nature Communications. (2020-12-23)

Device mimics life's first steps in outer space
A device developed by scientists at the CY Cergy Paris University and Paris Observatory promises insight into how the building blocks of life form in outer space. In Review of Scientific Instruments, the scientists detail how VENUS -- an acronym of the French phrase ''Vers de Nouvelles Syntheses,'' which means ''toward new syntheses'' -- mimics how molecules come together in the freezing darkness of interstellar space. (2020-12-15)

Researchers develop ultra-fast polymer modulators that can take the heat
Researchers in Japan have demonstrated a silicon-polymer hybrid modulator that can efficiently and reliably transmit data at 200 Gbit/s over an extremely wide range of temperatures from 25 °C to 110 °C. Use of such robust modulators in high-speed data applications could reduce cooling demands of the systems and expand applications in harsh environments. (2020-11-13)

Researchers discover the secret of how moss spreads
University of Copenhagen researchers have discovered how mosses became one of our planet's most widely distributed plants -- global wind systems transport them along Earth's latitudes, to rooftops, sidewalks and lawns worldwide, and as far away as Antarctica. This new knowledge can provide us with a better understanding of how other small organisms are spread, including airborne bacteria and organisms that produce airborne spores. (2020-11-10)

UM research essential to global arctic animal migration archive
Now, scientists can track the movements of thousands of Arctic and sub-Arctic animals over three decades with the new global Arctic Animal Movement Archive. (2020-11-06)

Short-term moisture removal can eliminate downy mildew of spinach
Scientists at the University of Arkansas explored the relationship between available moisture and disease establishment and in a recent article they demonstrated that removing moisture decreased both spore survival and disease. Even a 30-minute dry period reduced spore germination to almost zero. Spores were unable to recover and cause disease on spinach. (2020-11-02)

A fresh sense of possibility
A multisensory graphene-based skin can sense in extreme environments where other sensors cannot be used. (2020-09-22)

Camera monitoring significantly improves safety of HGV driving
A new study has shown HGV drivers drive much more safely when there are cameras in their cabs monitoring their behaviour. (2020-09-15)

Wild cousins may help crops battle climate change
Wild relatives of our domestic crops already cope with harsh conditions and resist disease. Can we use them to help our preferred crops adapt? (2020-09-09)

Making more of methane
Looking closely at the chemical process that transforms methane into useful products could help unveil more efficient ways to use natural gas. (2020-09-02)

Standing the test of time with a perfect partner
Identifying the ideal co-catalyst can significantly extend the working lifetime of solar fuel-generating photocatalysts. (2020-09-01)

Forging molecular bonds with green light
Scientists at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) in Brisbane, Australia, have created a new molecular coupling tool employing both green light and pH triggers that has potential for use in applications such as drug delivery and 3D cell culture platforms. (2020-08-23)

Trifluoroacetic acid acts as trifluoromethylating agent in arene C-H functionalization
Researchers at the Shanghai Institute of Organic Chemistry of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have developed a catalytic system that directly installs the trifluoromethyl group onto arenes. The new reaction uses simple and abundant trifluoroacetic acid as the trifluoromethylating agent, and offers a milder alternative to the existing strategies. (2020-08-05)

NYUAD astrophysicist investigates the possibility of life below the surface of Mars
Although no life has been detected on the Martian surface, a new study from astrophysicist and research scientist at the Center for Space Science at NYU Abu Dhabi, Dimitra Atri finds that conditions below the surface could potentially support it. (2020-07-28)

Using artificial intelligence to smell the roses
A pair of researchers at the University of California, Riverside, has used machine learning to understand what a chemical smells like -- a research breakthrough with potential applications in the food flavor and fragrance industries. (2020-07-28)

Life in the shallows becomes a trap for baby sharks
Baby reef sharks tolerate living in the sometimes-extreme environments of their nurseries -- but these habitats face an uncertain future which may leave newborn sharks 'trapped'. (2020-07-21)

Cancer cells in inhospitable brain fluids hijack iron to survive
In order to survive within the remote and harsh anatomical microenvironments of the central nervous system, the disseminated cancer cells that cause rare yet deadly leptomeningeal metastases (LM) hijack crucial iron micronutrients from native macrophages, researchers report. (2020-07-16)

UM researcher helps reveal changes in water of Canadian arctic
Melting of Arctic ice due to climate change has exposed more sea surface to an atmosphere with higher concentrations of carbon dioxide. Scientists have long suspected this trend would raise CO2 in Arctic Ocean water. Now University of Montana researcher Michael DeGrandpre and his patented sensors have helped an international team determine that, indeed, CO2 levels are rising in water across wide swaths of the Arctic Ocean's Canada Basin. (2020-06-24)

Washing away stubborn biofilms using fungal cleaning products
Growing inside pipes and on the surfaces of medical devices, bacterial biofilms cause major headaches for the food processing industry and healthcare professionals alike. Within biofilms, bacteria are protected from chemicals and antibiotics and can be almost impossible to eliminate. But researchers from the University of Tsukuba have shown that enzymes produced by yeasts, called biosurfactants, can dissolve stubborn biofilms and boost the efficacy of current chemical treatments, lessening their toxicity and environmental impacts. (2020-06-22)

Ultrastable, selective catalyst for propane dehydrogenation developed
A group of Japanese scientists has developed an ultrastable, selective catalyst to dehydrogenate propane - an essential process to produce the key petrochemical substance of propylene - without deactivation, even at temperatures of more than 600°C. (2020-06-05)

Scientists take first census of Arctic freshwater molluscs in 130 years
Based on previously released data and their own investigations, researchers at the St Petersburg University Laboratory of Macroecology and Biogeography of Invertebrates have assessed the diversity of freshwater molluscs in the Circumpolar region of the World. (2020-05-25)

Surrey reveals its implantable biosensor that operates without batteries
Researchers from the University of Surrey have revealed their new biodegradable motion sensor -- paving the way for implanted nanotechnology that could help future sports professionals better monitor their movements to aid rapid improvements, or help caregivers remotely monitor people living with dementia. (2020-05-21)

Tobacco companies minting it before Wednesday's UK menthol cigarette ban
Three days before menthol cigarettes are banned in the UK, new research highlights a sharp rise in their market share and extensive tobacco industry efforts to undermine legislation. (2020-05-17)

New study shines light on mysterious giant viruses
In recent years, giant viruses have been unearthed in several of the world's most mysterious locations, from the thawing permafrost of Siberia to locations unknown beneath the Antarctic ice. But don't worry, 'The Thing' is still a work of science fiction. For now. (2020-05-08)

Microorganisms in parched regions extract needed water from colonized rocks
Cyanobacteria living in rocks in Chile's Atacama Desert extract water from the minerals they colonize and, in doing so, change the phase of the material from gypsum to anhydrite. Researchers at the University of California, Irvine and Johns Hopkins University gained verification of this process through experiments, and the work points to possible strategies for humans to stay hydrated in harsh environments. (2020-05-04)

Study shows how microorganisms survive in harsh environments
In northern Chile's Atacama Desert, one of the driest places on Earth, microorganisms are able to eke out an existence by extracting water from the rocks they colonize. An Army-funded project by researchers at the University of California, Irvine, Johns Hopkins University and University of California, Riverside gained an in-depth understanding of the mechanisms by which some cyanobacteria, an ancient group of photosynthetic microbes, survive in harsh environments. (2020-05-04)

Arctic wildlife uses extreme method to save energy
The extreme cold, harsh environment and constant hunt for food means that Arctic animals have become specialists in saving energy. Now, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered a previously unknown energy-saving method used by birds during the polar night. (2020-04-28)

Views on guns and death penalty are linked to harsh treatment of immigrants
An online study that pulled equally from people who identify as Democrats or Republicans has found subtle new clues that underlie the dehumanization of immigrants. The findings by two University of Oregon researchers were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2020-04-22)

Cable bacteria can drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions from rice cultivation
The rice fields account for five percent of global emissions of the greenhouse gas methane, which is 25 times stronger than CO2. Researchers from Aarhus University and the University of Duisburg-Essen have found that cable bacteria could be an important part of the solution. In the laboratory, they have grown rice in soil with and without cable bacteria, and the pots with cable bacteria emitted 93% less methane than the pots without cable bacteria. (2020-04-20)

Discovery of a drug to rescue winter depression-like behavior
A group of animal biologists and chemists at the Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (WPI-ITbM), Nagoya University, has used a chemical genomics approach to explore the underlying mechanism of winter depression-like behavior and identified a drug that rescues winter depression-like behavior in medaka fish. (2020-04-13)

Discovery of second primate lineage that crossed the Atlantic to settle in the New World
Analyses of four fossilized molars newly excavated along the left bank of the Yuruá River in the Peruvian Amazon suggest another primate lineage distinct from the Platyrrhini -- until now considered to be the only primate group ever to inhabit the New World -- also occupied the New World for a brief period of time. (2020-04-09)

New in vivo priming strategy to train stem cells can enhance cardiac repair effectiveness
A stem cell biologist from City University of Hong Kong (CityU), together with his collaborators, has developed a novel strategy, called in vivo priming, to 'train' the stem cells to stay strong after implantation to the damaged heart via the 3D-printed bandage-like patch. The positive results of the study show that an in vivo priming strategy can be an effective means to enhance cardiac repair. (2020-03-27)

For clogged and hardened hearts, a mussel is the solution
Prof. Hyung Joon Cha and his research team developed a stem cell therapy on myocardial infarction, using proteins that can be found in mussels, mussel adhesive proteins. (2020-03-25)

Ocean acidification impacts oysters' memory of environmental stress
Researchers from the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences have discovered that ocean acidification impacts the ability of some oysters to pass down 'memories' of environmental trauma to their offspring. (2020-03-12)

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