Current Health Care Providers News and Events

Current Health Care Providers News and Events, Health Care Providers News Articles.
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UConn researcher offers lessons learned from a pre-pandemic study of telemedicine use
With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine has become a new norm for many routine and non-emergency medical needs. But there are lessons to be learned from telemedicine's use - or lack thereof - prior to the pandemic, and a new study from a UConn School of Social Work researcher offers insight for policymakers, administrators, and public health officials when considering the implementation of new services. (2021-02-22)

Setting hospital prices would save more than increasing competition or price transparency
Spending on hospital services is the largest health spending category in the U.S., accounting for one-third of national health expenses. A new study finds that among strategies to curb hospital prices among the commercially insured population in the U.S., direct price regulations such as setting rates are likely to achieve greater savings than other approaches like increasing competition or improving price transparency. (2021-02-18)

Study examines aspirin and statin use among older Americans
An analysis published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society indicates that while adults aged 75 years and older do not benefit from taking aspirin to prevent cardiovascular disease, many do so on a regular basis. (2021-02-18)

As insurers end grace period for COVID-19 hospital costs, study estimates potential bills
Hospital care for COVID-19 has been free to most patients, but insurance companies may be ending that. A study of flu-related hospital bills suggests a coronavirus hospital stay could now cost patients $1,000 out of their own pocket, on average. (2021-02-18)

New report calls for universal coverage of long-term care for older adults in U.S.
The COVID-19 pandemic's heavy toll on older Americans highlights the need to strengthen the nation's safety net for people in need of long-term services and supports, according to a new report published by Milbank Quarterly. The report proposes a system of universal coverage to support the long-term care of all older Americans. (2021-02-18)

One in 10 Ohio women thought abortion illegal amid attempts to ban at 6 weeks
Though Ohio never formally enacted a so-called ''heartbeat bill'' banning abortions after six weeks of gestation, legislative and legal actions appear to have fueled beliefs that abortion is illegal in the state, a new study has found. (2021-02-17)

'Smart' asthma inhaler sensors improve pediatric asthma control
Sensor-based inhalers integrated into health care providers' clinical workflows may help improve medication adherence and support children with asthma - and their families - to more effectively manage this condition, according to a new Northwestern and Lurie Children's study published in Pediatrics. (2021-02-17)

Brief survey tool tracks symptoms, aids in evaluating effectiveness of treatment
Researchers from Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine have developed and validated, SymTrak-8, a short questionnaire to help patients report symptoms and assist healthcare providers in assessing the severity of symptoms, and in monitoring and adjusting treatment accordingly. (2021-02-16)

CPAP treatment increases physical activity in adults with sleep apnea, heart disease
A new study found that treating obstructive sleep apnea with CPAP therapy increased self-reported physical activity in adults with a history of heart disease. (2021-02-16)

Parents Say COVID-19 has disrupted children's dental care
A third of parents say the COVID-19 pandemic has made it difficult to get dental care for their children, a new national poll suggests. But some families may face greater challenges than others. (2021-02-15)

STING activation reduces graft-versus-host disease in a mouse model
MUSC Hollings Cancer Center researcher Yongxia Wu, Ph.D., identified a new target molecule in the fight against graft-versus-host disease. (2021-02-11)

COVID-19 telemonitoring program helps reduce hospital admissions and ER visits
New Rochelle, NY, February 9, 2021--The rapid upscaling of a telemonitoring program in which health care providers performed daily telemedicine check-ins on COVID-19 patients faced a unique set of challenges. (2021-02-10)

Digital providers come to the fore to support global mental health during pandemic
Research published today shows how digital providers are coming together to support the mental health needs of millions of users unable to access traditional services during the COVID-19 pandemic. For the first time ever, digital providers and experts from over 20 countries have gathered a staggering number of insights about mental health during the pandemic from potentially upwards of 50 million users worldwide. (2021-02-10)

Survey: Cleaning product use affecting asthma more during COVID-19 measures
Those with asthma are experiencing less asthma control related to an increase in using household disinfectants -- known asthma triggers -- because of COVID-19, according to a survey co-conducted by University of Illinois Chicago researchers. (2021-02-10)

Expanded spina bifida guidelines cover care from newborn to adult
Globally, nearly 300,000 babies are born with neural tube defects including spina bifida (SB) each year. This openly available special issue of the Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine (JPRM) provides 20 important evidence- and consensus-based updates to key sections of the 2018 'Guidelines for the Care of People with Spina Bifida' issued by the Spina Bifida Association (SBA). (2021-02-09)

79% decrease in primary care visits, 56-fold increase in virtual care: COVID-19 pandemic
In the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, there was an almost 80% decrease in primary care office visits in Ontario and a 56-fold increase in virtual visits, found new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2021-02-08)

Addressing breastfeeding disparities for African American mothers
An abundance of data underscore the importance of breastfeeding and human milk for the optimal health of infants, children, mothers, and society. But while breastfeeding initiation rates have increased to more than 80% in the US, a disparity exists for African American mothers and infants. In this group, breastfeeding is initiated only about 69% of the time. (2021-02-08)

Analysis confirms racial disparities in COVID-19 infection
An analysis of Kaiser Permanente members in Northern California early in the COVID-19 pandemic found racial and ethnic disparities in the likelihood of testing positive for the coronavirus, but no significant disparities in mortality among those who were hospitalized. (2021-02-08)

Raised mortality from cardiac arrest in people with COVID-19
Sudden cardiac arrest is more often fatal in people with COVID-19, a new study shows. Those responsible for the research see the results as a wake-up call for the public and care providers alike. (2021-02-05)

Dementia-related psychosis: GSA experts identify ways to improve care
A new white paper from The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) highlights the variety of challenges that persons with dementia-related psychosis and their caregivers have encountered during moves through different health care settings -- and proposes strategies to address these challenges. (2021-02-04)

CO2 laser therapy helps improve sexual function in postmenopausal women with breast cancer
CLEVELAND, Ohio (Feb 3, 2021)--Postmenopausal women often complain of painful intercourse or a lack of desire caused by decreased estrogen levels, which affect vaginal elasticity and lubrication. Survivors of breast cancer typically experience worse symptoms as a result of cancer treatments, and concerns exist regarding hormone therapies. A new study suggests that fractional CO2 laser therapy may help. Study results are published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2021-02-03)

Digital health divide runs deep in older racial and ethnic minorities
Results of a study qualitatively exploring reasons for digital health information disparity reveal a deep digital health divide that has important implications for helping older adults with COVID-19 vaccinations. Participants who were older, less educated, economically disadvantaged and from ethnic groups (African American, Afro-Caribbean or Hispanic American) were up to five times less likely to have access to digital health information than were those who were younger, more highly educated, had a higher income, or were European Americans. (2021-02-03)

Delaying colonoscopy following abnormal stool test increases risk of colorectal cancer
A new VA study finds that delays in undergoing colonoscopy following an abnormal stool test increase the risk of a colorectal cancer diagnosis and cancer-related death. The findings showed the risk of colorectal cancer-related death increased by up to 1.5 times when colonoscopy was delayed more than 19 months. (2021-02-02)

Generous parental leave leads to staff shortages, nursing home deaths
A new paper in the Review of Economic Studies finds that a generous parental leave policy nurses enjoyed in Denmark caused nursing shortages, which resulted in a decline in the quality of hospital and nursing home care. The study estimates a large increase in nursing home mortality. (2021-01-28)

Enhanced recovery efforts for cesarean delivery reduce need for opioids by 80%
In a retrospective analysis of cesarean deliveries from 2015 through 2020, doctors from the Colorado Fetal Care Center at Children's Hospital Colorado found that using a wound infusion pump in combination with enhanced recovery efforts like removing urinary catheters earlier and walking around the same day of surgery can reduce opioid use by more than 80%. Also notable, researchers found a third of patients never took a single narcotic pain pill after cesarean delivery. (2021-01-28)

Screening asymptomatic health care personnel for COVID-19 not recommended by experts
Routine screening of asymptomatic health care personnel in the absence of confirmed exposures to COVID-19 is not a recommended strategy for preventing transmission of COVID-19, according to a new review. It found that such testing is unlikely to affect the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in health care settings and could even have unintended negative consequences. (2021-01-28)

Study shows when housing quality is poor, children suffer
A new nationally representative study in the Journal of Child Health Care, led by researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital, has found poor-quality housing is independently associated with poorer pediatric health, and suggests ways health care providers and housing programs may address those findings. (2021-01-28)

Pain patients who take opioids can't get in the door at over half of primary care clinics
People who take opioid medications for chronic pain may have a hard time finding a new primary care clinic that will take them as a patient if they need one, according to a new 'secret shopper' study of hundreds of clinics across the country. Stigma against long-term users of prescription opioids, likely related to the prospect of taking on a patient who might have an opioid use disorder or addiction, appears to play a role. (2021-01-27)

Offer COVID-19 vaccines to pregnant or breastfeeding people
People who are pregnant, breastfeeding or trying to conceive should be offered the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccine based on ethical grounds, argue authors of a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) (2021-01-27)

Addressing health disparities in diabetes requires a broader look at systemic racism
Poor social conditions caused by systemic racism contribute to health disparities in people with diabetes, according to a paper published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2021-01-26)

In ED patients with chest and abdominal pain, care delivered by physicians and APPs is si
In patients matched on complexity and acuity presenting to the emergency department with chest pain and abdominal pain, the care delivered by advanced practice providers (APPs) and emergency physicians is largely similar with respect to diagnostic test ordering and admission decisions. (2021-01-25)

Does where older US adults die affect their wellbeing at the end of life?
Where people die can affect the quality of their deaths and the end-of-life care that they receive. A study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found that satisfaction with end-of-life care was rated highest when individuals died at home. (2021-01-21)

Individual and organizational capacity to change can reduce health care workforce burnout
New George Mason University Study finds that health care professionals with a greater personal ability to respond to change experienced lower rates of burnout when their work environments offered strong communication, teamwork, and leadership support. This is one of the first studies to explore the effect of individual and organizational capacity for change on burnout among health care professionals. (2021-01-19)

NIH officials highlight COVID-19 vaccine facts, unknowns for healthcare providers
Healthcare providers must be able to explain the latest data supporting the safety and efficacy of vaccines for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) so they can strongly encourage vaccination when appropriate while acknowledging that uncertainty and unknowns remain. This message comes from a new commentary co-authored by Anthony S. Fauci, M.D., director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and other leading NIAID scientists in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. (2021-01-18)

COVID-19 deaths really are different. But best practices for ICU care should still apply
COVID-19 deaths are indeed different from other lung failure deaths, according to two recent studies, with 56% of COVID-19 patients dying primarily from the lung damage caused by the virus, compared with 22% of those whose lungs fail due to other causes. But, the researchers conclude, the kind of care needed to help sustain people through the worst cases of all forms of lung failure is highly similar, and just needs to be fine-tuned. (2021-01-15)

Hospitals must help their own COVID long-haulers recover, experts argue
Thousands of frontline health care workers risked their lives to save others during the pandemic. Some are suffering long-term complications of COVID-19. Yet there are no clear guidelines in most institutions to provide the necessary support to help their workers recover and return to work. Without accommodations, COVID long-haulers may be forced to leave the health care workforce -- at a time when COVID is surging again. (2021-01-12)

More than half of COVID-19 health care workers at risk for mental health problems
A new study, led by University of Utah Health scientists, suggests more than half of doctors, nurses, and emergency responders involved in COVID-19 care could be at risk for one or more mental health problems, including acute traumatic stress, depression, anxiety, problematic alcohol use, and insomnia. The researchers found that the risk of these mental health conditions was comparable to rates observed during natural disasters, such as 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina. (2021-01-12)

CDC report: removing unnecessary medical barriers to contraception
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is committed to removing unnecessary medical barriers to contraception use by people with certain characteristics or medical conditions. The CDC is celebrating the 10th anniversary of the release of its U.S. Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use (MEC), (2021-01-12)

Higher vaccine rates associated with indicative language by provider, more efficient
New research from Boston Medical Center finds that using clear, unambiguous language when recommending HPV vaccination both increases vaccine acceptance and increases conversation efficiency while preserving patient satisfaction. (2021-01-12)

Black and Hispanic Californians face health discrimination; less trusting of clinicians
A recent statewide survey of Californians uncovered that 30% of Black adults and 13% of Hispanic adults felt that they have been judged or treated differently by a health care provider because of their race/ethnicity or language. (2021-01-12)

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