Current Health Care Workers News and Events

Current Health Care Workers News and Events, Health Care Workers News Articles.
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Climate-friendly foam building insulation may do more harm than good
The use of the polymeric flame retardant PolyFR in 'eco-friendly' foam plastic building insulation may be harmful to human health and the environment, according to a new commentary in Environmental Science & Technology. The authors' analysis identifies several points during the lifecycle of foam insulation that may expose workers, communities, and ecosystems to PolyFR and its potentially toxic breakdown products. (2021-02-23)

A sleep disorder associated with shift work may affect gene function
Going on holiday can affect shift workers on the level of gene function: a new study indicates that resting during a holiday period restored functions associated with DNA regulation in shift workers suffering from sleep deprivation. (2021-02-22)

Paper: STEM skills gap modest among IT help desk workers
The incidence of prolonged hiring difficulties for workers with science and technology backgrounds is consistent with persistent hiring frictions and not a 'skills gap' in the labor market for information technology help desk workers, one of the largest computer occupations in the US, says new research by U. of I. labor professor Andrew Weaver. (2021-02-18)

In dueling ants vying to become queen, behavioral and molecular cues quickly determine who will win
In one species of ants, workers duel to establish new leadership after the death of their queen. While these sparring matches stretch for more than a month, changes in behavior and gene expression in the first three days of dueling can accurately predict who will triumph, according to a New York University study published in the journal Genes & Development. (2021-02-18)

The messenger matters in safe gun storage, suicide prevention education
Law enforcement and those in the military, rather than doctors and celebrities, are the most preferred messengers on firearm safety, a Rutgers study found. (2021-02-18)

COVID-19 infection rates high in pregnant women
The study also showed that the number of COVID-19 infections in pregnant patients from nearly all communities of color in Washington was high. There was a twofold to fourfold higher prevalence of pregnant patients with COVID-19 infections from communities of color than expected based on the race-ethnicity distribution of pregnant women in Washington in 2018. (2021-02-16)

Nursing home staff responses to pandemic reveal resilience, shortcomings: Concordia study
Writing in the Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis: Research and Practice, PhD student Daniel Dickson, his supervisor Patrik Marier, professor of political science, and co-author Robert Henry Cox of the University of South Carolina perform a comparative analysis of nursing home workers' experiences. In it, they look at Quebec (including those at government-run CHSLDs), British Columbia, Washington State and Ohio by reviewing 336 articles in six newspapers published between late-February and mid-June 2020. (2021-02-16)

Tropical paper wasps babysit for neighbours
Wasps provide crucial support to their extended families by babysitting at neighbouring nests, according to new research by a team of biologists from the universities of Bristol, Exeter and UCL published today [15 February] in Nature Ecology and Evolution. (2021-02-15)

LGBT+ workers experience higher levels of conflict at work, shows new report
The CIPD is today launching a new research report, co-authored by the University of Bath's Dr Luke Fletcher, to highlight how LGBT+ workers tend to have a more negative experience of work. (2021-02-11)

Study predicts UK COVID-19 vaccination program will very quickly reduce deaths but more slowly bring down hospital and ICU admissions
A new modelling study published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) shows that the UK's coronavirus vaccination program is already reducing daily deaths. However, reductions of hospital and intensive care (ICU) admissions will likely take several weeks longer, with large reductions seen by the end of March and continuing into April. (2021-02-11)

Study finds U.S. first responders have mixed feelings about COVID-19 vaccine
Firefighters and emergency medical services workers are at high risk of exposure to COVID-19 while on the job and pose an additional risk of transmitting the virus to others. Although vaccines are a promising public health tool for reducing COVID-19 transmission, little has been known about the perceptions of the COVID-19 vaccine among first responders. (2021-02-10)

79% decrease in primary care visits, 56-fold increase in virtual care: COVID-19 pandemic
In the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, there was an almost 80% decrease in primary care office visits in Ontario and a 56-fold increase in virtual visits, found new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2021-02-08)

Mount Sinai study finds wearable devices can detect COVID-19 symptoms and predict diagnosis
Wearable devices can identify COVID-19 cases earlier than traditional diagnostic methods and can help track and improve management of the disease, according to a Mount Sinai study. (2021-02-08)

Clients of female sex workers should be targeted for HIV prevention and treatment in South Africa
The researchers found that over a ten-year period (2010-19), sex between female sex workers and their paying clients contributed 6.9 per cent of new HIV infections, while sex between clients with their non-paying partners contributed 41.9 per cent (2021-02-04)

CU offers plan for improving mental health care for resident physicians
A pilot program to offer mental health services offered resident physicians at the University of Colorado School of Medicine provides a model for confidential and affordable help, according to an article published today by the journal Academic Medicine. (2021-02-04)

New study examines addiction medicine treatment in Vietnam
A study published in The Lancet HIV marks one of the first scientifically robust assessments of a new model of treating HIV in lower or middle income countries where injection drug use is a major cause of HIV infection. It also suggests the importance of building support for peer and community connections to tackle the opioid epidemic that continues to ravage the United States in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. (2021-02-04)

South Africa: the rising temperatures will cost up to 20% of per capita GDP
Reduced wage gap between high-skilled and low-skilled workers, and severe impacts on economic productivity. Climate change effects on economics and labour in a new study led by the CMCC Foundation and EIEE (RFF-CMCC European Institute on Economics and the Environment). (2021-02-02)

New research about emerging 'COVID-19 personality types'
New research just published identifies and explores the impacts of salient viral or COVID-19 behavioural identities that are emerging. (2021-01-29)

At-home swabs diagnose infections as accurately as healthcare worker-collected swabs
Self swabs and caregiver swabs are effective at detecting multiple pathogens and are just as accurate as those taken by healthcare workers, according to a team of Australian researchers. The research appears in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology. (2021-01-28)

Simulation helps refine pediatric care guidelines for COVID-19
DALLAS - Jan. 28, 2021 - Simulation can be a viable way to quickly evaluate and refine new medical guidelines and educate hospital staff in new procedures, a recent study from UT Southwestern's Department of Pediatrics shows. The findings, published recently in the journal Pediatric Quality and Safety and originally shaped around new COVID-19-related pediatric resuscitation procedures at UTSW and Children's Health, could eventually be used to help implement other types of guidelines at medical centers nationwide. (2021-01-28)

COVID-19 increases mortality rate among pregnant women
The study followed 240 pregnant women between March and June 2020 and found that the COVID-19 mortality rate in the pregnant women was significantly higher when compared to the COVID-19 mortality rate in similarly aged individuals within Washington state. (2021-01-27)

Study reveals precarious employment on the rise long before COVID-19
A study led by a University of Illinois Chicago researcher uses a new approach to measure precarious, or low-quality, employment in the United States. And, according to those findings, precarious employment has increased 9% between 1988 and 2016. Precarious employment, or P.E., is defined as low-quality employment, which is often characterized by low wages, job insecurity and irregular hours, making employment risky and stressful for the worker. (2021-01-27)

Hospital worker flu shots could mean fewer deaths
Research shows that state laws promoting flu vaccinations for hospital workers can substantially reduce the number of influenza-related deaths. (2021-01-26)

Less job stress for workers at financially transparent firms
Employees feel significantly less job distress if they work at companies that are open and transparent about the firm's finances, including budgets and profits, a new study found. Researchers examining data from the U.K. found that at companies with more financial transparency, workers felt more secure in their jobs, more committed to their employers and - most significantly - said they had better relationships with their managers. (2021-01-25)

Governments need to set clear rules for vaccinating health care workers against COVID-19
An analysis undertaken by Faculty of Law professors and a physician-researcher from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Ottawa feels provincial and territorial governments should set clear rules for vaccinating health care workers against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in public and private settings. (2021-01-25)

Does where older US adults die affect their wellbeing at the end of life?
Where people die can affect the quality of their deaths and the end-of-life care that they receive. A study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found that satisfaction with end-of-life care was rated highest when individuals died at home. (2021-01-21)

Rethink immigration policy for STEM doctorates
A streamlined process for awarding green cards to international STEM doctoral students graduating from U.S. universities could benefit American innovation and competitiveness, including leveling the field for startups eager to attract such highly skilled workers, according to a new study by researchers from Cornell University and the University of California, San Diego. (2021-01-21)

Why older adults must go to the front of the vaccine line
A new global, mathematical modeling study pubilshed in the journal Science shows that in most cases prioritizing older adults for COVID-19 vaccines saves the most lives. It also found that, in some cases, more lives could be saved and infections prevented if those who've already tested positive step to the back of the line. (2021-01-21)

Study shows number and variety of issues experienced by staff wearing
A new study analysing the impact of PPE staff shows that the number and variety of issues they experience increases as their time in PPE without a break increases, ranging from tiredness and headaches in the first hour to nausea, vomiting and dizziness as they head towards four hours continuously in PPE. (2021-01-21)

Ohio State-led support program suggests a reduction in preterm birth and infant mortality
New research suggests a unique program called Moms2B at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center shows a reduction in adverse pregnancy outcomes in communities disproportionately affected by these public health issues. (2021-01-19)

Rescuers at risk: emergency personnel face trauma and post traumatic stress symptoms
Researchers at the University of Bern's Hospital of Psychiatry have for the first time, demonstrated varying levels of post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in emergency personnel and rescue workers, with emergency department and psychiatry department staff demonstrating the highest levels of PTSS, suicidal thoughts and dysfunctional coping strategies. The study highlights the urgent need for job-specific training to improve emergency workers' quality of life and ability to cope with work-related trauma. (2021-01-19)

Set clear rules for vaccinating health care workers against SARS-CoV-2
Provincial and territorial governments should set clear rules for vaccinating health care workers against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, in public and private settings, and should not leave this task to employers, according to an analysis in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) https://www.cmaj.ca/content/cmaj/early/2021/01/19/cmaj.202755.full.pdf. (2021-01-19)

Worker safety goes beyond human error
Disasters in high-risk industries can have catastrophic environmental, financial and human safety consequences. One way these industries help prevent and mitigate disasters is formal procedures designed to standardize how work is done. These procedures typically come in the form of a written document workers use while performing a task. (2021-01-19)

Need to reduce work-related stress? It's a walk in the park
Research from the University of Tsukuba examined the relationship between ''sense of coherence'' (a quality indicative of stress-coping ability) and frequency of walking in forests or greenspaces. The aim was to find easy coping devices for workplace stress. Forest/greenspace walking at least once a week was found to correlate with those with a stronger sense of coherence. The findings suggest the benefits of walking in urban greenspaces or in forests to help with stress management. (2021-01-13)

Workaholism leads to mental and physical health problems
Workaholism or work addiction risk is a growing public health concern that can lead to many negative mental and physical health outcomes such as depression, anxiety or sleep disorder. Perception of work (job demands and job control) may become a major cause of employees' work addiction. The international group of researchers including the HSE University scientist explored the link between work addiction risk and health-related outcomes using the framework of Job Demand Control Model. (2021-01-13)

Hospitals must help their own COVID long-haulers recover, experts argue
Thousands of frontline health care workers risked their lives to save others during the pandemic. Some are suffering long-term complications of COVID-19. Yet there are no clear guidelines in most institutions to provide the necessary support to help their workers recover and return to work. Without accommodations, COVID long-haulers may be forced to leave the health care workforce -- at a time when COVID is surging again. (2021-01-12)

More than half of COVID-19 health care workers at risk for mental health problems
A new study, led by University of Utah Health scientists, suggests more than half of doctors, nurses, and emergency responders involved in COVID-19 care could be at risk for one or more mental health problems, including acute traumatic stress, depression, anxiety, problematic alcohol use, and insomnia. The researchers found that the risk of these mental health conditions was comparable to rates observed during natural disasters, such as 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina. (2021-01-12)

Primary care plays key role in managing COVID-19 in three Asian cities
Despite having some of the densest living spaces and the highest number of international visitors, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Beijing have utilized their respective primary health care systems to keep their COVID-19 cases and deaths relatively low. (2021-01-12)

Fewer patient encounters drive decline in total primary care office visits
Despite seeing gains in insurance coverage for preventive health services under the Affordable Care Act, the US has seen a declining rate of primary care visits over the past fifteen years. Are fewer individuals seeing primary care physicians? (2021-01-12)

New study shows mental health of ICU staff should be immediate priority
New research from King's College London shows nearly half of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) staff are likely to meet the threshold for PTSD, severe anxiety or problem drinking during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2021-01-12)

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