Current Health Insurance News and Events

Current Health Insurance News and Events, Health Insurance News Articles.
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Novice drivers talking on hand-held smartphones are more likely to run red-lights
Young novice drivers who speak into hand-held smartphones while driving are also likely to drive while under the influence of drink or drugs, according to researchers at Lero, the Science Foundation Ireland Research Centre for Software. (2021-02-23)

Communal activities boost rehabilitation for older adults in long term care
A group of researchers has developed a new program showing participation and activity is critical for the rehabilitation of older adults in long-term care. (2021-02-19)

As insurers end grace period for COVID-19 hospital costs, study estimates potential bills
Hospital care for COVID-19 has been free to most patients, but insurance companies may be ending that. A study of flu-related hospital bills suggests a coronavirus hospital stay could now cost patients $1,000 out of their own pocket, on average. (2021-02-18)

Parents Say COVID-19 has disrupted children's dental care
A third of parents say the COVID-19 pandemic has made it difficult to get dental care for their children, a new national poll suggests. But some families may face greater challenges than others. (2021-02-15)

Dark-skinned teens, females prime targets of acne's psychological fallout
A more aggressive approach to treating acne that marries the disciplines of psychology and dermatology is needed, according to two UC Riverside psychology researchers. They also assert that women and people with darker skin disproportionately suffer from acne's psychological impacts. (2021-02-12)

Association between unemployment insurance, food insecurity among people who lost jobs during COVID-19 pandemic in US
This study investigated how unemployment insurance and a $600 per week federal supplement to unemployment insurance were associated with food insecurity among people in low- and middle-income households who lost jobs during the COVID-19 pandemic. (2021-01-29)

COVID unemployment assistance puts food on the table: BU study
Another wave of COVID-19 is putting millions out of work, while tens of millions more remain unemployed, and Congress debates aid. Now, a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study shows that unemployment help directly translates to people being able to put food on the table. (2021-01-29)

Medicaid expansion helps uncover undiagnosed HIV infections
Expanding eligibility for Medicaid, the federal-state health insurance program for low-income individuals, was associated with a 13.9% increase in HIV diagnoses, says new research co-written by Dolores AlbarracĂ­n, a professor of psychology and of business administration at Illinois, and Bita Fayaz Farkhad, pictured, an economist and a postdoctoral researcher in psychology at Illinois. (2021-01-26)

Nearly one in four families hesitant to take their child to ER during COVID-19 pandemic
During the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, nearly one in four families responded that they would be unlikely to bring their child to the Emergency Department if they had an emergency condition, according to a survey from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago published in the journal Academic Emergency Medicine. (2021-01-25)

Advances in modeling and sensors can help farmers and insurers manage risk
A review of index insurance for smallholder farmers shows the potential of high-resolution satellite imagery to help poor farmers be compensated for potentially devastating losses. (2021-01-21)

State responses, not federal, influenced rise in unemployment claims early in the pandemic
Early in the U.S. COVID-19 pandemic, unemployment claims were largely driven by state shutdown orders and the nature of a state's economy and not by the virus, according a new article by Georgia State University economists. (2021-01-19)

Unexplained 7-fold variation in euthanasia rates across the Netherlands
There's a 7-fold unexplained variation in rates of euthanasia across The Netherlands, reveals an analysis of health insurance claims data, published online in the journal BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care. (2021-01-14)

Endocrine Society recommends government negotiation and other policies to lower out-of-pocket costs
The Endocrine Society is calling on policymakers to include government negotiation as part of an overall strategy to reduce insulin prices in its updated position statement published today in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2021-01-12)

Prevalence of patients receiving dialysis in China may exceed 800,000 by 2025
Study projects that prevalence of patients receiving dialysis in China will increase from 384.4 patients per million (PPM) in 2017 to 629.7 PMP in 2025 with a predicted 874,373 patients receiving dialysis in 2025. (2021-01-12)

Black and Hispanic Californians face health discrimination; less trusting of clinicians
A recent statewide survey of Californians uncovered that 30% of Black adults and 13% of Hispanic adults felt that they have been judged or treated differently by a health care provider because of their race/ethnicity or language. (2021-01-12)

Non-Hispanic Black patients are disproportionately left off liver transplant waitlists
A new study of liver transplant centers confirms that non-Hispanic white patients get placed on liver transplant waitlists at disproportionately higher rates than non-Hispanic Black patients. (2021-01-11)

Similar factors cause health disparities in cancer, COVID-19
The same societal factors that have caused worse outcomes in cancer for some minority populations are now causing disparities in COVID outcomes. Potential policy changes could help improve outcomes for both diseases. (2020-12-23)

Digital trackers for mental health not yet fit for purpose
Digital tracking of people with mental health conditions has the power to transform medical diagnostics and treatment, but its claims need careful scrutiny, says an expert in digital analytics from the University of Bath. (2020-12-15)

The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health: Black children diagnosed with severe sepsis are more likely to die than White or Hispanic children, hospital data suggests
Black children hospitalized in the US due to severe sepsis have 20% greater odds of death than White or Hispanic children, according to research published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal. (2020-12-14)

The role of platform protection insurance in the sharing economy
PPI significantly increases buyer spending and seller revenues, affirming the benefits of this service in the sharing economy. (2020-12-10)

Life expectancy and healthcare costs for patients with rheumatoid arthritis
A new study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology suggests that recent advances in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis have prolonged patients' lives but also increased healthcare costs. (2020-12-09)

Racial disparities in stage of breast cancer diagnosis
Minority women and women in general aged 50-64 in Pennsylvania showed an increased proportion of early-stage breast cancer diagnosis since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Under the ACA, more women are able to get early breast health screening. (2020-12-09)

Chicago neighborhoods with barriers to social distancing had higher COVID-19 death rates
New research has found that Chicago neighborhoods with barriers to social distancing, including limited access to broadband internet and low rates of health insurance, had more COVID-19 deaths in spring 2020. (2020-12-03)

National Autism Indicators Report: health and health care of individuals with autism
In the recently published sixth report in the National Autism Indicators Report series, researchers from Drexel University's A.J. Drexel Autism Institute highlight a holistic picture of what health and health care look like across the life course for people on the autism spectrum. (2020-12-01)

Adults with overweight or obesity often don't recognize they have a weight problem
A cross-sectional analysis of NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) data found that more than 40% of U.S. adults with overweight and nearly 10% with obesity did not consider themselves to be overweight. This trend has increased over the last two decades and was especially true of non-Hispanic Blacks and persons with low socioeconomic status. The findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2020-12-01)

For people with diabetes, medicaid expansion helps, but can't do it all: BU study
Medicaid expansion through the Affordable Care Act has insured millions of low-income people in the United States, improving outcomes for patients with many different diseases. But expansion alone has not been enough to improve outcomes for patients with diabetes, according to a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study. (2020-11-24)

Medicaid expansion may result in earlier diagnosis of colon cancer
The Affordable Care Act's Medicaid expansion for low-income people appears to lead to earlier diagnosis of colon cancer, enhanced access to care, and improved surgical care for patients with this common cancer. (2020-11-23)

Study involving seven children's hospitals shows COVID-19 typically mild in children
In the largest U.S. study of its kind to date, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and other PEDSnet sites report that of more than 135,000 pediatric patients tested for SARS-CoV-2 in pediatric health systems, 4% tested positive for the virus. However, the researchers also found patients from ethnic minorities, adolescents, patients with history of public insurance, and those with certain underlying medical conditions were more likely to test positive. (2020-11-23)

U.S. should look at how other high-income countries regulate health care costs
Structuring negotiations between insurers and providers, standardizing fee-for-service payments and negotiating prices can lower the United States' health care spending by slowing the rate at which healthcare prices increase, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-11-22)

Artificial intelligence-based tool may help diagnose opioid addiction earlier
Researchers have used machine learning, a type of artificial intelligence, to develop a prediction model for the early diagnosis of opioid use disorder. The advance is described in Pharmacology Research & Perspectives. (2020-11-18)

EMS dispatches for asthma greatly reduced after expanded access to health insurance
The expansion of health insurance in New York City under the Affordable Care Act resulted in a significant reduction in the dispatch of ambulances for asthma emergencies, a study by Massachusetts General Hospital has found. Researchers suggest that the reason for this decline is improved access to outpatient management of asthma. The finding has major implications for the broader public health system. (2020-11-11)

Diseases of despair diagnoses increase in Pennsylvania
Medical diagnoses involving alcohol-related disorders, substance-related disorders and suicidal thoughts and behaviors -- commonly referred to as diseases of despair -- increased in Pennsylvania health insurance claims between the years 2007 and 2018, according to researchers from Penn State Clinical and Translational Science Institute and Highmark Health Enterprise Analytics. (2020-11-10)

Under-insured transgender americans turn to riskier sources for gender-affirming hormones
Transgender people who lack access to insurance coverage for gender-affirming hormone therapy are more likely to use hormones from sources other than a licensed prescriber, compared to those with insurance coverage. (2020-11-10)

Postpartum care fails to provide women with key recommended services
Most women are receiving fewer than half the services recommended during their comprehensive postpartum medical checkup, according to a study by University of Massachusetts Amherst researchers. (2020-11-10)

Serious disparities in care and outcomes found among Black and non-white heart patients
Adults who are Black or from other underrepresented racial/ethnic groups received up to 10% fewer early treatments for heart problems compared to white patients. When compared to whites, Black patients had longer hospital stays and fewer discharges to home. Hispanics, Asians, Pacific Islanders and Native Americans all had higher in-hospital death rates than white patients. (2020-11-09)

'Diseases of despair' have soared over past decade in US
'Diseases of despair', such as substance abuse, alcohol dependency, and suicidal thoughts and behaviours, have soared in the US over the past decade, reveals an analysis of health insurance claims data published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2020-11-09)

Expanded birth control coverage may help reduce disparities in unplanned pregnancies
Removing out-of-pocket costs for contraception may help reduce the income-related disparities that play such a significant role in unintended pregnancies, a new Michigan Medicine-led study suggests. (2020-11-06)

Underinsurance is growing, but HSAs aren't keeping up: BU study
High deductible health plans (HDHPs) have become much more common among all racial/ethnic and income groups, but the health savings accounts (HSAs) that make these plans potentially workable are far less common among Black, Hispanic, and lower-income enrollees--and the gap is growing. (2020-11-06)

Health care use drops during pandemic; switch to telemedicine creates disparities
One of the first studies to quantify the cuts in elective medical care experienced in March and April found that the number of mammograms and colonoscopies dropped by more than 65% during the period. Lower rates of telemedicine use were observed among patients who reside in lower-income or predominately non-white zip codes. (2020-11-05)

ACA results in fewer low-income uninsured, but non-urgent ER visits haven't changed
Since the Affordable Care Act's (ACA) Medicaid expansion program went into effect 10 years ago, the U.S. has seen a larger reduction in the number of uninsured low-income, rural residents, compared to their urban contemporaries. But the likelihood of repeated visits to emergency rooms for non-urgent reasons has not decreased. (2020-11-05)

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