Current Health Status News and Events

Current Health Status News and Events, Health Status News Articles.
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Helping behavior may mitigate academic risk for children from low-income neighborhoods
Children raised in neighborhoods with low socio-economic status are at risk for low academic achievement. A new longitudinal study followed young children from such neighborhoods from birth until age seven to explore whether children's capacity to act kindly or generously towards others (prosocial behavior) - including peers, teachers, and family - is linked to their ability to perform well in school. The study showed that prosocial behavior may mitigate academic risk across early childhood. (2021-02-17)

Health survey conveys messages on how we should live
The questions in a health survey aimed at young people raise issues of status and convey norms about what people should own and how they should be. This is according to a study from Linköping University. The results have been published in the journal Children & Society. (2021-02-16)

Star employees get most of the credit - and blame
Working with a ''star'' employee - someone who demonstrates exceptional performance and enjoys broad visibility relative to industry peers - offers both risks and rewards, according to new research from the Cornell University's ILR School. (2021-02-16)

Israelis unwilling to risk two-state solution, new RAND report
A new RAND Corporation report assesses potential alternative solutions to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict that average Israelis and Palestinians would support. Israelis across the political spectrum prefer the status quo to the two-state solution, and Palestinians are only willing to accept a two-state solution that Israelis will be unable to accept. (2021-02-10)

Apps help integration and health of migrants
A new study has found that mobile apps can play a vital role in helping immigrants integrate into new cultures, as well as provide physical and mental health benefits. (2021-01-29)

COVID-19: 1 in 3 adults anxious, depressed
COVID-19 has led to psychological distress among one in three adults, systematic review and meta-analysis reveals. (2021-01-28)

Medicaid expansion helps uncover undiagnosed HIV infections
Expanding eligibility for Medicaid, the federal-state health insurance program for low-income individuals, was associated with a 13.9% increase in HIV diagnoses, says new research co-written by Dolores Albarracín, a professor of psychology and of business administration at Illinois, and Bita Fayaz Farkhad, pictured, an economist and a postdoctoral researcher in psychology at Illinois. (2021-01-26)

UW researchers develop tool to equitably distribute limited vaccines
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and UW Health have developed a tool that incorporates a person's age and socioeconomic status to prioritize vaccine distribution among people who otherwise share similar risks due to their jobs. (2021-01-15)

Scientists find out how nutrition affects the recovery of patients after cardiac surgery
Scientists from St Petersburg University have found out how eating habits of patients affect their recovery after cardiac surgery. People with valvular heart disease have appeared to be at risk. (2020-12-25)

Consumers challenged by high status peers make a 'status pivot,' new study finds
When outshone by peers in one area of life, such as financial success, consumers will embrace making a 'status pivot' to show prowess in another aspect of life, such as personal relationships, social life, parenting, physical and mental health, and fitness, according to a new report by researchers from Boston College, Boston University and London Business School. (2020-12-21)

New in the Hastings Center Report, November-December 2020
Appealing to patient autonomy, bioethicists argue for making oral contraceptives, HIV-prevention medicines, statins, and many other prescription drugs available over the counter. (2020-12-16)

Majority of pregnant women who tested positive for COVID-19 were asymptomatic, study finds
Illustrates how pandemic disproportionally impacted vulnerable populations and underserved communities (2020-12-11)

Kids gain weight when new convenience stores open nearby
A new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, found that changes in the food environment around low-income and high-ethnic/racial minority populations over time impact childhood obesity. Increased availability of small grocery stores selling a selection of healthy items in close proximity to children's homes improves their weight status over time, whereas increased availability of convenience stores selling predominantly unhealthy foods is likely to be detrimental. (2020-12-10)

Which product categories and industries benefit most from social advertising
New research from a team of scientists at four leading universities has shed new light on the effectiveness of social advertising in specific product categories to learn which product categories tend to benefit more from social advertising, and which may not. (2020-12-10)

Engaged dads can reduce adolescent behavioral problems, improve well-being
In low-income families, fathers who are engaged in their children's lives can help to improve their mental health and behavior, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study published in the journal Social Service Review. (2020-12-09)

Role of birth order on career choice might have been overestimated in previous research
In a new study that could turn what we know about birth order upside down, a University of Houston researcher has found that the role of birth order on career types, occupational creativity and status attainment might have been overestimated in previous research. (2020-12-03)

UBC study explores link between social status and trust in decision-makers
A recent study examining perceptions of power suggests that individuals with lower socioeconomic statuses are more likely to have a negative view of policy or decision-makers. (2020-12-03)

Deciphering the energetic code of cells for better anticancer therapies
A procedure that may help personalise anticancer therapies has just been developed by the CNRS, INSERM, and Aix-Marseille University scientists in association with colleagues from the University of California San Francisco and the Marseille Public University Hospital System (AP-HM), with support from Canceropôle Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur. Their patented technique reveals the energy status of cells, an indicator of their activity. (2020-12-01)

Narcissists love being pandemic 'essential workers'
There's one group of essential workers who especially enjoy being called a ''hero'' during the COVID-19 pandemic: narcissists. In a new study, researchers found that essential workers (including those in restaurants, grocery and retail stores) who scored higher on measures of narcissism shared more than others about their work. And this sharing on social media, in person and elsewhere increased their narcissistic feelings in the moment. (2020-11-24)

Better survival among women after lung cancer surgery
There are known differences in the survival rates of women and men with lung cancer. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden set out to investigate potential reasons behind this disparity, such as the presence of other underlying diseases and smoking status. The study, which was published in Chest, shows that women have better survival rates after lung cancer surgery than men, independent of other factors. (2020-11-23)

Children born extremely preterm are more likely to be diagnosed with depression
A study using extensive nationwide registry data showed that girls born extremely preterm, earlier than 28 weeks gestational age, were three times more likely to be diagnosed with depression than peers born close to the expected date of delivery. Increased risk of depression also applied to girls and boys with poor fetal growth born full-term and post-term. The effects of poor fetal growth were more evident with increasing gestational age. (2020-11-12)

Two genes regulate social dominance
Using the Nobel Prize gene-editing technique, a University of Houston researcher has found that two genes regulate social dominance in cichlid fish and - possibly - humans. (2020-11-10)

Lockdown lifestyle link to poor mental health in Scotland
A rise in negative health behaviors - such as lack of sleep, exercise and an unhealthy diet -- is connected to poorer mental health during the tightest restrictions of Scotland's COVID-19 lockdown, a new study has confirmed. (2020-11-04)

Cognitive disorders linked to severe COVID-19 risk
Dementia and other cognitive disorders now appear to be risk factors for developing severe COVID-19, according to research from the University of Georgia. (2020-10-28)

DNA sleuths target ivory poachers
The tiniest amount of DNA is being accurately analysed to identify the origins of old ivory. This clever new technique has the potential to thwart international ivory poachers, by placing the origins of ivory pieces into accurate source locations, thereby identifying specific areas where ivory poachers are actively operating. (2020-10-26)

Evenness is important in assessing progress towards sustainable development goals
Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) emphasize a holistic achievement instead of cherry-picking a few. However, no assessment has quantitatively considered the evenness among all goals. Here, Liu and colleagues propose a systematic method, integrating both evenness and the overall status of all goals to expand the implications of sustainable development assessment, and revisit the development trajectory in China from 2000 to 2015. The study demonstrates the importance of adopting evenness in assessing and guiding sustainable development. (2020-10-26)

Racial, socioeconomic disparities in extensive-stage small cell lung cancer treatment
A new study shows that Black individuals with extensive-stage small cell lung cancer are less likely to receive chemotherapy for their disease compared to white and other racial groups. Led by researchers at Boston Medical Center, the results indicate that individuals who are Black, elderly, uninsured, or have non-private health insurance and lower education levels, were less likely to be treated with chemotherapy for this type of lung cancer. (2020-10-26)

Poor women in Bangladesh reluctant to use healthcare
A study, published in PLOS ONE, found that the women living in Dhaka slums were reluctant to use institutionalised maternal health care for fear of having to make undocumented payments, unfamiliar institutional processes, lack of social and family support, matters of honour and shame, a culture of silence and inadequate spousal communication on health issues. (2020-10-23)

And the winner is... dependent on judging accountability
A new study suggests that the status of award nominees combined with the level of social connection that they have with members of a judging panel can work both ways towards determining how successful they are -- depending on whether or not they are judged publicly or privately. (2020-10-13)

SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy was not associated with complications in neonates
In a new study published in the journal JAMA researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital have examined the association between a positive SARS-CoV-2 test during pregnancy and complications in mothers and their newborn babies. Almost two out of three pregnant women who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 were asymptomatic and the researchers found no higher prevalence of complications during delivery or of ill-health in the neonates. However, preeclampsia was more common in infected women. (2020-09-23)

Your neighborhood may raise your risk of chronic kidney disease
A neighborhood's overall socioeconomic status, including income and education-level, may influence its residents' risk of chronic kidney disease, according to a study recently published in SSM Population Health by researchers from Drexel University's Dornsife School of Public Health. (2020-09-23)

Study shows the importance of good cardiovascular health in preventing type 2 diabetes, regardless of genetic risk
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), held online this year, shows the importance of good cardiovascular health in preventing type 2 diabetes (T2D) among middle-aged individuals, regardless of any genetic predisposition they may have towards developing the disease. (2020-09-23)

Study: Black women with breast cancer experience delayed, longer treatment than whites
One in seven black women with breast cancer had delays in starting treatment, and black women also had extended duration of treatment, according to a study led by UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers. (2020-09-21)

Study links higher level of exercise to 25% to 32% lower risk of all-cause mortality in people with type 2 diabetes
New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), held online this year, shows that having a greater exercise capacity is associated with a significantly decreased all-cause mortality risk of between 25-33% in people with type 2 diabetes (T2D). (2020-09-20)

Study highlights possible causes of racial disparities in prostate cancer deaths
New research provides insights on the potential causes of racial disparities in deaths following prostate cancer surgery. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society (ACS). (2020-09-08)

Vitamin D levels in the blood can predict future health risks and death
Free, circulating vitamin D levels in the blood may be a better predictor of future health risks in aging men, according to a study being presented at e-ECE 2020. These data suggest the free, precursor form of vitamin D found circulating in the bloodstream is a more accurate predictor of future health and disease risk, than the often measured total vitamin D. (2020-09-07)

Evaluating the effect of plain afforestation project and future spatial suitability in Beijing
Taking the 'One Million-Mu (666 km2)' Plain Afforestation (Phase I) Project in Beijing city as an example, the authors monitored the growth status of planted forest patches using long-term remote sensing images, which constructed a series of spatial variables of suitability map for afforestation. Moreover, a modeling framework of the spatial distribution of Phase II afforestation in this study can be used to support the decision making and policy implementation of afforestation projects in China. (2020-09-03)

Obesity prevalence varies widely among Latino populations, NYC study finds
A new study of obesity among the largest Latino populations living in New York City (NYC) finds that the prevalence of obesity varies widely--with Mexicans and Puerto Ricans much more likely to have obesity than Dominicans, Ecuadorians, and Colombians. The study is presented at The European and International Congress on Obesity (ECOICO 2020), (2020-08-31)

Society perceives the poor as less affected by distress than those with more means
The poor are perceived to be less harmed by negative events than those with more means, even when this is patently false, according to a series of studies published by Princeton University. (2020-08-17)

Racial, socioeconomic disparities fuel increased infant mortality rates in California
While infant mortality rates (IMR) decreased overall from 2007 to 2015 in California, disparities in infant death rates have increased in some groups, including among obese mothers, those who smoke and African American women, according to a new study published in PLOS One. (2020-08-11)

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