Current Healthcare Costs News and Events | Page 2

Current Healthcare Costs News and Events, Healthcare Costs News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
Nursing homes may misinterpret mental changes, falls as infection
There is a widespread belief that a change in the mental status or an increase in falls in a nursing home resident may indicate an underlying infection. This contributes to the overuse of antibiotics, according to revised clinical guidance by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The guidance, published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, outlines criteria on evaluating non-localizing symptoms as indicators of infection. (2020-12-09)

Racial disparities in stage of breast cancer diagnosis
Minority women and women in general aged 50-64 in Pennsylvania showed an increased proportion of early-stage breast cancer diagnosis since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Under the ACA, more women are able to get early breast health screening. (2020-12-09)

Healthcare workers 7 times as likely to have severe COVID-19 as other workers
Healthcare workers are 7 times as likely to have severe COVID-19 infection as those with other types of 'non-essential' jobs, finds research focusing on the first UK-wide lockdown and published online in the journal Occupational & Environmental Medicine. (2020-12-08)

Health Affairs: Reprocessing single-use med devices boosts circular economy for hospitals
Regulated medical device reprocessing is an important tool in improving environmental and public health outcomes, according to a new analysis published in Health Affairs. The paper indicates that health care systems generate significant amounts of air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, the majority of which come from the supply chain. Hospitals that have medical devices reprocessed by regulated reprocessors removed over 7,100 tons of waste, a number that could grow dramatically, according to the researchers. (2020-12-07)

New lab-on-a-chip infection test could provide cheaper, faster portable diagnostics
A tiny new silicon-based lab-on-chip test could pave the way for cheap handheld infectious disease testing. (2020-12-02)

Cost of planting, protecting trees to fight climate change could jump
Planting trees and preventing deforestation are considered key climate change mitigation strategies, but a new analysis finds the cost of preserving and planting trees to hit certain global emissions reductions targets could accelerate quickly. (2020-12-01)

Trees can help slow climate change, but at a cost
Widespread forest management and protections against deforestation can help mitigate climate change - but will come with a steep cost if deployed as broadly as policymakers have discussed, new research suggests. (2020-12-01)

Towards accessible healthcare for all in sub-Saharan Africa
A state-of-the-art georeferenced database of public healthcare facilities. In the prestigious journal PNAS, a new study published with the contribution of the RFF-CMCC European Institute on Economics and the Environment (EIEE) provides a comprehensive planning-oriented, inequality-focused analysis of different types of healthcare accessibility in sub-Saharan Africa. (2020-11-30)

COVID-19 amplifies inequalities in healthcare access for ethnic minority and migrant women
In their recent research paper, published in the Feminist Legal Studies journal, City, University of London's Dr Sabrina Germain and Dr Adrienne Yong say existing barriers to medical care for these marginalised women have been intensified by the pandemic, and must be examined so as to understand their poorer health outcomes. (2020-11-27)

51% of Americans agree paying college athletes should be allowed
More Americans than not believe that college athletes should be allowed to be paid more than what it costs them to go to school, a new national study of nearly 4,000 people suggests. Findings from the National Sports and Society Survey (NSASS) suggest that 51 percent of adults agree that college athletes should have the ability to be paid above school costs, 41 percent disagree and 8 percent don't know. (2020-11-24)

Growing risks of STIs in over-45s
Sexually-active over-45s are at a high risk of contracting STIs because people do not want to talk about holder people having sex, a report has found. (2020-11-23)

More than 1.1 million deaths among Medicare recipients due to high cost of drugs
WASHINGTON, DC and SAN DIEGO, CA - Nov. 19, 2020 - More than 1.1 million Medicare patients could die over the next decade because they cannot afford to pay for their prescription medications, according to a new study released today by the West Health Policy Center, a nonprofit and nonpartisan policy research group and Xcenda, the research arm of the drug distributor AmerisourceBergen. (2020-11-19)

Study identifies reasons for soaring nuclear plant cost overruns in the US
MIT researchers have analyzed the causes of many cost overruns on new nuclear power plants in the US, which have soared in the past 50 years. The findings may help designers of new plants build in resilience to prevent such added costs. (2020-11-18)

Faster disclosure under RTRS delivering transparency that helps muni market stakeholders
University of Oregon researchers have found three-fold benefits when the gap in trade reporting in municipal bond markets changed from a full day to fifteen minutes after implementation of the Real-Time Transaction Reporting System. Municipalities, they report, can benefit from the real-time reporting system through more efficient capital markets, creating benefits for society because municipal bond offerings fund infrastructure investments that often improve quality of life, education and public safety. (2020-11-10)

Female mongooses start battles for chance to mate
Female banded mongooses lead their groups into fights then try to mate with enemy males in the chaos of battle, new research shows. (2020-11-09)

Expanded birth control coverage may help reduce disparities in unplanned pregnancies
Removing out-of-pocket costs for contraception may help reduce the income-related disparities that play such a significant role in unintended pregnancies, a new Michigan Medicine-led study suggests. (2020-11-06)

Underinsurance is growing, but HSAs aren't keeping up: BU study
High deductible health plans (HDHPs) have become much more common among all racial/ethnic and income groups, but the health savings accounts (HSAs) that make these plans potentially workable are far less common among Black, Hispanic, and lower-income enrollees--and the gap is growing. (2020-11-06)

Costs to informal carers for people in the last three months of life are larger than those to formal
Findings from an international study into the costs and outcomes of informal end of life care have today been published BMC Medicine. (2020-11-05)

Decennial 2020 research sets the agenda for advancing safe healthcare
More than 700 studies, including 250 international abstracts, highlighting worldwide progress in preventing and controlling healthcare-associated infections and addressing antibiotic resistance were published today as part of the proceedings from the Sixth Decennial International Conference on Healthcare-Associated Infections. The Sixth Decennial, a conference co-hosted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and SHEA, was cancelled in March due to the COVID-19 pandemic. All abstracts accepted for the meeting appear in a supplement for the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. (2020-11-02)

Removing this hidden nasty from our food could save thousands of lives
Banning a harmful ingredient from the Australian food supply could prevent thousands of deaths from heart disease according to new research from The George Institute for Global Health. (2020-11-02)

New simulation finds max cost for cost-effective health treatments
As health care costs balloon in the U.S., experts say it may be important to analyze whether those costs translate into better population health. A new study led by a Penn State researcher analyzed existing data to find a dividing line - or ''threshold - for what makes a treatment cost-effective or not. (2020-11-02)

Hospital floors are hotspot for bacteria, creating route of transfer to patients
The floors of hospital rooms are frequently contaminated with antibiotic-resistant bacteria within hours of patient admission, creating a route of transfer of potentially dangerous organisms to patients, according to a study published today as part of the proceedings from Decennial 2020: The Sixth International Conference on Healthcare-Associated Infections. Decennial 2020, an initiative of the CDC and SHEA, was cancelled in March due to the pandemic. (2020-10-30)

Healthcare app reduces symptoms of COPD compared to regular treatment
A Southampton-developed healthcare app that helps people with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) manage their condition can speed up recovery after hospital admission and reduce flare-ups of symptoms, a newly published study has shown. (2020-10-30)

Effective stroke drugs are saving the NHS millions
Drugs prescribed to high-risk stroke patients are costing the NHS hundreds of millions each year - but they are so effective, the service is actually saving money. (2020-10-29)

Poor women in Bangladesh reluctant to use healthcare
A study, published in PLOS ONE, found that the women living in Dhaka slums were reluctant to use institutionalised maternal health care for fear of having to make undocumented payments, unfamiliar institutional processes, lack of social and family support, matters of honour and shame, a culture of silence and inadequate spousal communication on health issues. (2020-10-23)

Healthcare's earthquake: Lessons from COVID-19
Leaders and clinician researchers from Beth Israel Lahey Health propose using complexity science to identify strategies that healthcare organizations can use to respond better to the ongoing pandemic and to anticipate future challenges to healthcare delivery. (2020-10-23)

COVID-19 a double blow for chronic disease patients
The COVID-19 pandemic has escalated into a 'syndemic' for people with chronic illnesses, a new UNSW study analysing data from low and middle-income countries shows. (2020-10-23)

Dementia prevention strategies could save £1.9 billion annually
Programmes to reduce dementia risk by targeting smoking, high blood pressure and hearing loss are likely to be cost-effective and cost saving by reducing dementia rates by 8.5%, finds a new study by UCL and LSE researchers, published in The Lancet Healthy Longevity. (2020-10-20)

The mental health impact of pandemics for front line health care staff
New research shows the impact that pandemics have on the mental health of front-line health care staff. Researchers investigated how treating patients in past pandemics such as SARS and MERS affected the mental health of front-line staff. They found that over a third experienced anxiety or depression, almost a quarter experienced PTSD. The team hope that their work will help highlight the impact that the Covid-19 pandemic could be having on the mental health of doctors and nurses worldwide. (2020-10-16)

Researchers seek to end unexpected bills for screening colonoscopies
Nearly 1 in 8 commercially insured patients nationwide who underwent an elective colonoscopy between 2012 and 2017 performed by an in-network provider received ''surprise'' bills for out-of-network expenses, often totaling hundreds of dollars or more. (2020-10-15)

Ultrasound technique offers more precise, quantified assessments of lung health
Researchers have developed a technique that uses ultrasound to provide non-invasive assessments of pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary edema. The technique has been shown to both quantify lung scarring and detect lung fluid in rats. A study on pulmonary edema in humans is under way. (2020-10-15)

SHEA updates guidance for healthcare workers with HIV, hepatitis
In light of the low rate of transmission and advances in treatments for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV, SHEA released updated guidance for healthcare personnel living with these bloodborne pathogens based on the latest available science. The SHEA White Paper, ''Management of Healthcare Personnel Living with Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, or Human Immunodeficiency Virus in United States Healthcare Institutions,'' was published online in the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. (2020-10-14)

Winners and losers of energy transition
Drastically reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the electricity sector could have substantial economic and social impacts. Some regions might benefit more than others from new employment opportunities and from reduced air pollution, while others face threats to employment. Such a transition to renewable electricity thus risks creating new regional winners and losers. In a study published in Nature Communications, scientists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) quantify regional impacts associated with Central European electricity targets. (2020-10-13)

Proactive steps linked to reduced medical costs, hospital visits for children with asthma
A new study looking at data from tens of thousands of children with asthma finds that several widely available interventions are associated with both reduced medical costs and a reduced likelihood that the children will need to visit an emergency room or stay in the hospital. (2020-10-12)

Four in 10 extra deaths in Lombardy not linked to COVID-19
The study, published in PLOS ONE, looked at the number of deaths in each of the 7,251 local authority areas of Italy during the first four months of the year and compared these figures with predictions based on data from 2016-2019. It found that Lombardy had the most excess deaths of any region in Italy. (2020-10-09)

Majority of Americans trust Biden to lead US healthcare system amid COVID-19 pandemic
Ability to manage the pandemic and reducing healthcare costs are equally important to Americans in determining their vote for president. (2020-10-08)

Stopping opioid-related addiction, harm and accidents after surgery
An international group of global experts including anaesthetists, surgeons and other healthcare professionals have come together to publish a consensus statement on the prevention of opioid-related harm in adult surgical patients. The consensus statement is published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists). (2020-10-07)

Big drug costs for small patients with rare diseases, study finds
Only about one in every 170 children take them. But ''orphan drugs'' accounted for 1 in every 15 private insurance dollars spent on children's health care in the United States in 2018, according to a new study. That's up 65% from just five years before. And even though insurance companies pay much of the cost of high-priced orphan drugs that treat rare childhood diseases, families' share of the cost has risen rapidly. (2020-10-06)

Study finds severe financial stress for breast cancer patients during and after treatment
The effects of cancer treatment on a patient's body are easy to see, whether it is a lack of hair on their head, sores on their skin or a look of fatigue on their face. And while there has been a lot of discussion around these impacts, a new study looks at just how much the stress of financial hardship caused by cancer care and treatment can affect a patient's emotional, mental and physical well-being. (2020-10-06)

Women and men executives have differing perceptions of healthcare workplaces according to a survey report in the Journal of Healthcare Management
Healthcare organizations that can attract and retain talented women executives have the advantage over their peers, finds a special report in the September/October issue of the Journal of Healthcare Management, an official publication of the American College of Healthcare Executives (ACHE). (2020-10-05)

Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.