Current Healthcare System News and Events

Current Healthcare System News and Events, Healthcare System News Articles.
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Physical conditions linked to psychological distress in patients with cancer
Among patients with cancer, having additional physical comorbidities was linked with a higher risk of experiencing psychological distress. The finding comes from a Psycho-Oncology analysis of 2017 data from the National Health Survey of Spain. (2021-02-18)

ASHP publishes reports exploring pharmacy's role in future of healthcare delivery
ASHP today announced the publication of two landmark reports that articulate a futuristic vision for pharmacy practice, including expanded roles for the pharmacy enterprise in healthcare organizations. The 2021 ASHP/ASHP Foundation Pharmacy Forecast Report and the Vizient Pharmacy Network High-Value Pharmacy Enterprise (HVPE) framework, published in AJHP, outline opportunities for pharmacy leaders to advance patient-centered care, population health, and the overall well-being of their organizations (2021-02-16)

Silicon chip provides low cost solution to help machines see the world clearly
Researchers in Southampton and San Francisco have developed the first compact 3D LiDAR imaging system that can match and exceed the performance and accuracy of most advanced, mechanical systems currently used. (2021-02-10)

Role of aspirating system type in SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity among dental staff
High-volume aspirators are recommended in dental clinics during the COVID-19 pandemic, but a new study published in the JDR Clinical & Translational Research, shows that the type of aspirating system significantly affects the incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection among dental specialists (2021-02-08)

Majority skeptical healthcare costs will fall anytime soon as Biden begins presidency
In his inaugural address, President Biden vowed that 'help is on the way' to a nation grappling with a pandemic that has already claimed over 420,000 lives and counting. However, despite the promise of a better future, a new survey from West Health and Gallup finds Americans remain largely skeptical that issues as varied as managing the COVID-19 crisis, lowering healthcare costs, improving the economy, fixing immigration and addressing climate change, will improve anytime soon. (2021-01-28)

At-home swabs diagnose infections as accurately as healthcare worker-collected swabs
Self swabs and caregiver swabs are effective at detecting multiple pathogens and are just as accurate as those taken by healthcare workers, according to a team of Australian researchers. The research appears in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology. (2021-01-28)

Genomic studies implicate specific genes in post-traumatic stress disorder
After analyzing the genomes of more 250,000 military veterans, researchers have identified 18 specific, fixed positions on chromosomes that appear associated with post-traumatic stress disorder. The findings may point to new therapeutic drug targets. (2021-01-28)

Gut microbiota reveals whether drug therapies work in inflammatory bowel diseases
A study recently completed at the University of Helsinki indicates that the gut microbiota of patients suffering from inflammatory gastrointestinal disorders can be used to predict whether they will benefit from expensive therapies. The study also confirms the key role of therapies that have a beneficial effect on the gut microbiota in inflammatory bowel diseases. (2021-01-26)

SHEA releases COVID-19 research agenda identifying gaps in knowledge
Massive amounts of COVID-19 research has been published since the pandemic began, but much more study is needed to understand how to prevent, identify, and treat the virus. The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America is publishing a COVID-19 research agenda outlining 10 areas where we need to learn more to fight COVID-19 and future pandemics. (2021-01-21)

Mental health conditions alarmingly high among children with autism
Nearly 78 per cent of children with autism have at least one mental health condition and nearly half have more than that. Mental health conditions were present in 44.8 per cent of pre-school age children with autism--a group among which prevalence had not previously been established using a large, population-based sample. Only 14.1 per cent of children without autism (ages 3-17) had mental health conditions. (2021-01-19)

The COVID-19 pandemic in brazil has overwhelmed its health systems
An analysis of the first 250,000 patients admitted to hospital with coronavirus reveals a high mortality and inequities in the quality of healthcare across regions (2021-01-15)

Healthcare Nutrition Council leads the way on medical food discussions
Medical foods help patients manage their nutritional needs, yet it can be very difficult for patients to have access to them. In August 2019, the Healthcare Nutrition Council (HNC), in partnership with the American Society for Nutrition (ASN), held the Medical Foods Workshop: Science, Regulation, and Practical Aspects. (2021-01-12)

How did trauma centers respond to COVID-19? New processes provide care to trauma patients while keeping providers safe
As the COVID-19 pandemic emerged, trauma centers faced unprecedented obstacles to providing care for injured patients. A look at steps taken by trauma centers in response to COVID-19 is provided by a survey in the January/February Journal for Healthcare Quality (JHQ), the peer-reviewed journal of the National Association for Healthcare Quality (NAHQ). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-12-30)

Study finds patients with kidney failure are ready and willing to use mobile health
* In a survey of adults with kidney failure who were receiving dialysis, most owned mobile devices and had intermediate or advanced mobile health proficiency. * The main reasons for using mobile health were for making appointments, communicating with healthcare personnel, and obtaining laboratory results. (2020-12-22)

Healthcare workers have increased insomnia, risk of severe mental health problems: COVID-19 study
University of Ottawa global meta-analysis finds significant mental-health consequences for population, but especially healthcare workers. (2020-12-17)

Aroma diffuser and plastic bag offer inexpensive method to test fit of face masks at home
Researchers have developed a way to use a simple home aroma diffuser to test whether N95 and other types of sealing masks, such as KN95 and FFP2 masks, are properly fitted, a result which could be used to help protect healthcare workers and the public from contracting or transmitting COVID-19. (2020-12-16)

Dartmouth-led research featured in national journal focused on health system performance
New findings published by Dartmouth researchers and featured in a special issue of Health Services Research, are helping to generate new insights and knowledge about the prevalence, roles, and impact of integrated health systems. (2020-12-15)

Unexpectedly, data show that anaesthetists and intensive care doctors are at lower risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection compared with other medical staff
Following the first recorded death of an anaesthetist from COVID-19 in the UK in November 2020, a review of available data published in Anaesthesia (a journal of the Association of Anaesthetists) shows that unexpectedly, despite their perceived increased exposure to COVID-19 patients and high-risk procedures, anaesthetists and intensive care doctors appear to be at lower risk of being infected with SARS-CoV-2 and developing COVID-19. (2020-12-11)

Essential oral healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed the need for consensus on the definition of essential oral healthcare. The article 'Pandemic considerations on essential oral healthcare' provides a layered model of essential oral healthcare, integrating urgent and basic oral healthcare, as well as advanced and specialist oral healthcare. (2020-12-10)

Nursing homes may misinterpret mental changes, falls as infection
There is a widespread belief that a change in the mental status or an increase in falls in a nursing home resident may indicate an underlying infection. This contributes to the overuse of antibiotics, according to revised clinical guidance by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The guidance, published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, outlines criteria on evaluating non-localizing symptoms as indicators of infection. (2020-12-09)

Racial disparities in stage of breast cancer diagnosis
Minority women and women in general aged 50-64 in Pennsylvania showed an increased proportion of early-stage breast cancer diagnosis since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Under the ACA, more women are able to get early breast health screening. (2020-12-09)

Healthcare workers 7 times as likely to have severe COVID-19 as other workers
Healthcare workers are 7 times as likely to have severe COVID-19 infection as those with other types of 'non-essential' jobs, finds research focusing on the first UK-wide lockdown and published online in the journal Occupational & Environmental Medicine. (2020-12-08)

Health Affairs: Reprocessing single-use med devices boosts circular economy for hospitals
Regulated medical device reprocessing is an important tool in improving environmental and public health outcomes, according to a new analysis published in Health Affairs. The paper indicates that health care systems generate significant amounts of air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions, the majority of which come from the supply chain. Hospitals that have medical devices reprocessed by regulated reprocessors removed over 7,100 tons of waste, a number that could grow dramatically, according to the researchers. (2020-12-07)

Clinical trial results address concerns about pharmacogenetic testing
Researchers conducted a randomized controlled trial of pharmacogenetic testing related to cholesterol-lowering medications called statins.After one year, the cholesterol levels in the group who received their pharmacogenetic results were not higher than those in the group who did not receive their results, and they were not less likely to receive medical care meeting recommended guidelines. (2020-12-03)

Towards accessible healthcare for all in sub-Saharan Africa
A state-of-the-art georeferenced database of public healthcare facilities. In the prestigious journal PNAS, a new study published with the contribution of the RFF-CMCC European Institute on Economics and the Environment (EIEE) provides a comprehensive planning-oriented, inequality-focused analysis of different types of healthcare accessibility in sub-Saharan Africa. (2020-11-30)

COVID-19 amplifies inequalities in healthcare access for ethnic minority and migrant women
In their recent research paper, published in the Feminist Legal Studies journal, City, University of London's Dr Sabrina Germain and Dr Adrienne Yong say existing barriers to medical care for these marginalised women have been intensified by the pandemic, and must be examined so as to understand their poorer health outcomes. (2020-11-27)

Gene donors at high risk for cancer received feedback
Researchers at the Estonian Genome Center at the University of Tartu studied how people at high risk for breast, ovarian or prostate cancer responses to the feedback of genetic findings. Gene donors who chose to receive results appreciated being contacted and considered the information provided to be valuable. Authors find that knowing more about people's genetic traits will significantly expand the chances of early detection of breast-, ovarian- and prostate cancer in the future. (2020-11-25)

Growing risks of STIs in over-45s
Sexually-active over-45s are at a high risk of contracting STIs because people do not want to talk about holder people having sex, a report has found. (2020-11-23)

COVID-19 is making tinnitus worse -- new study
New research reveals that tinnitus, a common condition that causes the perception of noise in the ear and head, is being exacerbated by COVID-19. The study, which involved 3,103 participants from 48 countries, found that 40% of those displaying symptoms of COVID-19 simultaneously experience a worsening of their tinnitus. It also found that a large proportion of people believe their tinnitus is being made worse by social distancing measures introduced to help control the virus. (2020-11-05)

Expensive gene therapies raise challenges and opportunities: Expert panel report
Gene therapies are being approved for use in Canada, but could strain healthcare budgets and exacerbate existing treatment inequities across the country. However, there are opportunities to control spending, streamline approvals and support fair access through innovation, coordination and collaboration, according to a new expert panel report from the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA). (2020-11-03)

Decennial 2020 research sets the agenda for advancing safe healthcare
More than 700 studies, including 250 international abstracts, highlighting worldwide progress in preventing and controlling healthcare-associated infections and addressing antibiotic resistance were published today as part of the proceedings from the Sixth Decennial International Conference on Healthcare-Associated Infections. The Sixth Decennial, a conference co-hosted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and SHEA, was cancelled in March due to the COVID-19 pandemic. All abstracts accepted for the meeting appear in a supplement for the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. (2020-11-02)

Hospital floors are hotspot for bacteria, creating route of transfer to patients
The floors of hospital rooms are frequently contaminated with antibiotic-resistant bacteria within hours of patient admission, creating a route of transfer of potentially dangerous organisms to patients, according to a study published today as part of the proceedings from Decennial 2020: The Sixth International Conference on Healthcare-Associated Infections. Decennial 2020, an initiative of the CDC and SHEA, was cancelled in March due to the pandemic. (2020-10-30)

Healthcare app reduces symptoms of COPD compared to regular treatment
A Southampton-developed healthcare app that helps people with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) manage their condition can speed up recovery after hospital admission and reduce flare-ups of symptoms, a newly published study has shown. (2020-10-30)

Study finds PTSD interacts with klotho gene, may cause premature aging in the brain
Genetics and the environment (including psychiatric stress) may contribute to the pace of cellular aging, causing some individuals to have a biological age that exceeds their chronological age. (2020-10-26)

Poor women in Bangladesh reluctant to use healthcare
A study, published in PLOS ONE, found that the women living in Dhaka slums were reluctant to use institutionalised maternal health care for fear of having to make undocumented payments, unfamiliar institutional processes, lack of social and family support, matters of honour and shame, a culture of silence and inadequate spousal communication on health issues. (2020-10-23)

Healthcare's earthquake: Lessons from COVID-19
Leaders and clinician researchers from Beth Israel Lahey Health propose using complexity science to identify strategies that healthcare organizations can use to respond better to the ongoing pandemic and to anticipate future challenges to healthcare delivery. (2020-10-23)

COVID-19 a double blow for chronic disease patients
The COVID-19 pandemic has escalated into a 'syndemic' for people with chronic illnesses, a new UNSW study analysing data from low and middle-income countries shows. (2020-10-23)

The mental health impact of pandemics for front line health care staff
New research shows the impact that pandemics have on the mental health of front-line health care staff. Researchers investigated how treating patients in past pandemics such as SARS and MERS affected the mental health of front-line staff. They found that over a third experienced anxiety or depression, almost a quarter experienced PTSD. The team hope that their work will help highlight the impact that the Covid-19 pandemic could be having on the mental health of doctors and nurses worldwide. (2020-10-16)

Predicting influenza epidemics
Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed a unique method to predict influenza epidemics by combining several sources of data. The forecasts can be used, for example, when planning healthcare provision, such that resources can be redistributed in the best possible manner and give everyone the best possible care during an epidemic. (2020-10-15)

SHEA updates guidance for healthcare workers with HIV, hepatitis
In light of the low rate of transmission and advances in treatments for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV, SHEA released updated guidance for healthcare personnel living with these bloodborne pathogens based on the latest available science. The SHEA White Paper, ''Management of Healthcare Personnel Living with Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, or Human Immunodeficiency Virus in United States Healthcare Institutions,'' was published online in the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. (2020-10-14)

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