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Current Healthcare Costs News and Events, Healthcare Costs News Articles.
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Texas A&M research team develops bioinks to print therapeutics in 3D
A team of researchers at Texas A&M University has developed an innovative way to print therapeutics in 3D for regenerative medicine. (2019-06-03)
Implementation of Oregon paid family leave to ensure equality critical, research finds
Oregon is considering a bill to implement paid family leave, House Bill 2005, following in the footsteps of Washington, which approved a similar policy in 2017. (2019-06-03)
Depression sufferers at risk of multiple chronic diseases
Women who experience symptoms of depression are at risk of developing multiple chronic diseases, research led by The University of Queensland has found. (2019-05-30)
Emergency room or doctor's office?
A new study in the journal Heliyon, published by Elsevier, examines the relationship between the way individuals perceive and respond to threats (threat sensitivity) and where they most frequently seek medical care. (2019-05-30)
Study finds lower ER triage scores associated with delayed antibiotics delivery for sepsis patients
in a new study, researchers at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City found that antibiotic delivery was significantly faster -- by up to 32 minutes -- for sepsis patients being treated in an emergency department if they were assigned a slightly higher score on a subjective one-to-five acuity scale commonly used for patient triage. (2019-05-22)
Successful HIV effort prompts call for clinics to expand mental health services on site
Increasing access to mental health services improves HIV outcomes among vulnerable patients, a new study suggests. (2019-05-21)
Do family members belong in ICU during procedures? Study finds clinicians mixed on practice
Do family members of loved ones who are critically ill and being treated in an intensive care unit at a hospital belong there when clinicians are performing bedside procedures? (2019-05-20)
New computer-based predictive tool more accurately forecasts outcomes for respiratory patients
Are electronic health records and computer calculations a better, more accurate way to predict clinical outcomes for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease? (2019-05-20)
Electric car switch on for health benefits
Could the health benefits and reduced costs to healthcare systems be enough to justify subsidizing charging infrastructure to allow society to switch from the internal combustion engine to electric vehicles faster than current trends predict? (2019-05-16)
Weight loss medicines underutilized by veterans
Despite the availability of new weight management medications and several clinical guidelines recommending their use as part of a comprehensive treatment plan for obesity, a new study has found that their use is extremely low (about one percent) among eligible Veterans. (2019-05-15)
Tech-saavy people more likely to trust digital doctors
Would you trust a robot to diagnose your cancer? According to researchers at Penn State, people with high confidence in machine performance and also in their own technological capabilities are more likely to accept and use digital healthcare services and providers. (2019-05-10)
Percutaneous ablation vs. surgery for hepatocellular carcinoma
Compared to surgery, percutaneous liver ablation interventions (IRs) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are associated with lower inhospital mortality, length of hospital stay (LOS), and hospitalization costs, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2019 Annual Meeting, set for May 5-10 in Honolulu, Hawaii. (2019-05-07)
Airbnb vs. hotels: New research sheds light on how they can compete and benefit
Researchers from the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University published new research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science which sheds new light on the impact Airbnb and similar 'sharing economy' companies are having on the hospitality industry. (2019-05-06)
Managing architectural distortion on mammography based on MR enhancement
High negative predictive values (NPV) in mammography architectural distortion (AD) without ultrasonographic (US) correlate or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhancement suggests follow-up rather than biopsy may be safely performed, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2019 Annual Meeting, set for May 5-10 in Honolulu, Hawaii. (2019-05-05)
Induced labor not more expensive to health care system than spontaneous labor
The results of a joint study between University of Utah Health and Intermountain Healthcare show inducing labor one week early costs the same as waiting for spontaneous labor. (2019-05-03)
Medical costs create hardships for more than half of Americans
A new study by American Cancer Society researchers finds more than half of people in the US report problems with affordability, stress, or delaying care because of medical costs (2019-05-02)
Out-of-pocket costs for neurologic medications rise sharply over 12 years
The amount of money people pay out-of-pocket for drugs to treat neurologic conditions like multiple sclerosis, dementia and Parkinson's disease has risen sharply over 12 years, with the most dramatic increase for multiple sclerosis (MS) medications, according to a study published in the May 1, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2019-05-01)
Research suggests strategy for more equitable Medicare reimbursement
Those who were enrolled in both Medicare and Medicaid were sicker, had more cognitive impairments and difficulty functioning, and needed more social support than those who were not enrolled in both government programs, Saint Louis University research found. (2019-04-29)
Genetic testing in women diagnosed with breast cancer decreases cost of care nationwide
A new study suggests that Oncotype DX-guided treatment could reduce the cost for the first year of breast cancer care in the US by about $50 million (about 2 percent of the overall costs in the first year). (2019-04-24)
Feces transplantation: Effective treatment with economic benefits
From an average of 37 days in hospital to just 20 days per year. (2019-04-23)
Information technology can support antimicrobial stewardship programs
The incorporation of information technology (IT) into an antimicrobial stewardship program can help improve efficiency of the interventions and facilitate tracking and reporting of key metrics. (2019-04-23)
Solar panel demand causing spike in worldwide silver prices
Rising demand for solar panels is having a major effect on the worldwide price of silver, which could lead to solar panel production costs becoming far higher in the future, new research from the University of Kent has demonstrated. (2019-04-17)
Achieving sugar reduction targets could cut child obesity and healthcare costs
Reducing the sugar content of certain foods by 2020, in line with UK government policy targets, could cut child obesity and related illness, and save the NHS in England £286 million over 10 years, suggests a study published by The BMJ today. (2019-04-17)
The pressure to prescribe: Antibiotic stewardship in the outpatient setting
Outpatient healthcare providers inappropriately prescribed antibiotics to 40 percent of patients in a major Veterans Affairs healthcare system, a higher figure than in previous studies examining outpatient antibiotic use, according to a new study appearing in the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC), the journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology published by Elsevier. (2019-04-16)
Labeling added sugars content on packaged foods and beverages could lower heart disease/diabetes risk and cut healthcare costs
Labeling food products and beverages for added sugars could generate substantial health benefits over the next 20 years, potentially preventing nearly 1 million cases of cardiovascular disease and diabetes and lowering healthcare costs. (2019-04-15)
FDA added sugar label could be a cost-effective way to improve health, generate savings
The FDA's mandatory added sugar labeling policy for packaged foods and beverages could generate important health gains and cost-savings for the healthcare system and society, according to a new modeling study led by researchers from Tufts University and the University of Liverpool. (2019-04-15)
Primary care services account for a small share of Medicare spending, study finds
Some states including Oregon and Rhode Island have begun adopting minimum primary care spending goals because health system orientation toward primary care is associated with higher quality, better outcomes and lower costs. (2019-04-15)
Hospital study finds substantial proportion of patients and healthcare workers shed flu virus before symptoms appear
New research examining influenza transmission in a tertiary hospital finds that a substantial proportion of patients and healthcare works shed the flu virus before the appearance of clinical symptoms. (2019-04-15)
Eliminating routine but low-value preoperative tests for cataract surgery patients associated with cost savings
Eliminating routine but unnecessary procedures before people undergo cataract surgery has the potential to save costs and resources for hospitals serving lower-income patients. (2019-04-15)
National handwashing campaign reduces incidence of Staphylococcus aureus infection in Australia's hospitals
Since its implementation in 2009, the National Australian Hand Hygiene Initiative (NHHI) has seen significant, sustained improvements in hand hygiene compliance among Australian healthcare workers, and reduced risks of potentially fatal healthcare-associated Staphylococcus aureus infection, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam. (2019-04-14)
Study finds low hand hygiene compliance on ICUs
Healthcare workers on intensive care units (ICUs) are regularly missing opportunities to clean their hands during the care of patients, despite its critical importance for infection control, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16). (2019-04-14)
Medicaid could save $2.6 billion within a year if just 1% of recipients quit smoking
Reducing smoking, and its associated health effects, among Medicaid recipients in each state by just 1 percent would result in $2.6 billion in total Medicaid savings the following year, according to new research by UC San Francisco. (2019-04-12)
High prevalence of healthcare-associated infections and low testing rates found in European hospitals and long-term care facilities
The European Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (ECDC) estimates that 9 million cases of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) occur across Europe each year -- with around one in 15 patients in acute care hospitals and one in 24 residents in long-term care facilities having at least one infection on any given day. (2019-04-12)
New guideline decreases breast cancer re-operation rates
A UBC medical student has determined that a new surgical guideline is making a difference for breast cancer patients. (2019-04-09)
Social insecurity also stresses chimpanzees
Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology conducted behavioral observations and collected urine samples for cortisol analysis of male chimpanzees of the Tai National Park, Ivory Coast, during periods of intense male-male competition. (2019-04-05)
What are the costs of continued smoking among patients with cancer?
This study was an economic evaluation and it used a model to examine the costs of subsequent cancer treatment associated with continued smoking by patients after their initial cancer treatment failed. (2019-04-05)
Study calculates costs associated with smoking by patients with cancer
A study released today in JAMA Network Open reported that smoking after a cancer diagnosis is associated with substantial additional costs of cancer treatment. (2019-04-05)
Vision loss associated with longer hospital stays, more readmissions, greater costs
Researchers analyzed health care claims data for older adults (12,330 Medicare beneficiaries and 11,858 with commercial health insurance) to see if vision loss was associated with longer stays and higher readmission rates and costs when patients were hospitalized with common illnesses. (2019-04-04)
Government and NHS leaders could do more to encourage collaborative relationships between healthcare
The Nuffield Council on Bioethics has published a briefing note outlining the factors that can contribute to disagreements between parents and healthcare staff about the care and treatment of critically ill babies and young children. (2019-04-03)
Are healthcare providers 'second victims' of medical errors?
Four women with family members who died as a result of preventable medical error penned an editorial for The BMJ urging abandonment of the term 'second victims' to describe healthcare providers who commit errors. (2019-04-02)
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