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Current Healthcare News and Events, Healthcare News Articles.
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Information technology can support antimicrobial stewardship programs
The incorporation of information technology (IT) into an antimicrobial stewardship program can help improve efficiency of the interventions and facilitate tracking and reporting of key metrics. (2019-04-23)
Hospital study finds substantial proportion of patients and healthcare workers shed flu virus before symptoms appear
New research examining influenza transmission in a tertiary hospital finds that a substantial proportion of patients and healthcare works shed the flu virus before the appearance of clinical symptoms. (2019-04-15)
National handwashing campaign reduces incidence of Staphylococcus aureus infection in Australia's hospitals
Since its implementation in 2009, the National Australian Hand Hygiene Initiative (NHHI) has seen significant, sustained improvements in hand hygiene compliance among Australian healthcare workers, and reduced risks of potentially fatal healthcare-associated Staphylococcus aureus infection, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam. (2019-04-14)
Study finds low hand hygiene compliance on ICUs
Healthcare workers on intensive care units (ICUs) are regularly missing opportunities to clean their hands during the care of patients, despite its critical importance for infection control, according to new research being presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16). (2019-04-14)
High prevalence of healthcare-associated infections and low testing rates found in European hospitals and long-term care facilities
The European Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (ECDC) estimates that 9 million cases of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) occur across Europe each year -- with around one in 15 patients in acute care hospitals and one in 24 residents in long-term care facilities having at least one infection on any given day. (2019-04-12)
Government and NHS leaders could do more to encourage collaborative relationships between healthcare
The Nuffield Council on Bioethics has published a briefing note outlining the factors that can contribute to disagreements between parents and healthcare staff about the care and treatment of critically ill babies and young children. (2019-04-03)
Are healthcare providers 'second victims' of medical errors?
Four women with family members who died as a result of preventable medical error penned an editorial for The BMJ urging abandonment of the term 'second victims' to describe healthcare providers who commit errors. (2019-04-02)
Shift work increases diabetes and heart disease risk
Many studies have shown that shift work is associated with heart and metabolic diseases, but new research in Experimental Physiology has clarified how shift work can have a long-term effect on the risk of heart disease and diabetes. (2019-04-02)
Abandon the term 'second victim' say families of patients who died after medical errors
Families of patients who died after medical errors argue that it's time to abandon the term 'second victim' to describe doctors who are involved in a medical error. (2019-03-27)
A viable alternative to Medicare-for-all? We can and must do better!
Medicare-for-all, a solution that would bring United States healthcare policies more in line with other industrial nations, faces strong opposition and is unlikely to be enacted in the foreseeable future. (2019-03-25)
Affordable Care Act delivers significant benefits for women
According to a new study appearing in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, the rate of health insurance coverage and access to affordable acute and preventive care services improved for women after the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). (2019-03-21)
Improper removal of personal protective equipment contaminates health care workers
More than one-third of healthcare workers were contaminated with multi-drug resistant organisms (MDRO) after caring for patients colonized or infected with the bacteria, according to a study published today in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2019-03-20)
Researchers find eight new unique gene mutations in patients with hereditable heart muscle disease
In a new study from the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City, researchers have identified eight new gene mutations that may cause or contribute to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, a form of heart disease not caused by known external influences, such as high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, or diseased coronary arteries. (2019-03-18)
Doctor video visits increase access to healthcare but could risk fragmentation
In today's fast-paced digital society, virtual doctor visits are on the rise and offer patients a more convenient way to receive medical care from anywhere. (2019-03-14)
UK failing to provide universal health coverage by charging undocumented migrant kids
By charging undocumented child migrants for healthcare, the UK is failing to provide universal health coverage -- in contravention of the Sustainable Development Goals and its obligations under the UN convention on children's rights -- argue infectious disease and global health experts in an editorial published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood. (2019-03-14)
Subsidies for infection control to healthcare institutions help reduce infection levels
Researchers compared three types of infection control subsidies and found that under a limited budget, a dollar-for-dollar matching subsidy, in which policymakers match hospital spending for infection control measures, was the most effective at reducing the number of hospital-acquired infections. (2019-03-12)
VA study evaluates quality indicators for hormone therapy in menopausal women
Improvements are needed in VA's prescribing of hormone therapy for menopausal women veterans, concludes a study in the Journal for Healthcare Quality, the peer-reviewed journal of the National Association for Healthcare Quality. (2019-03-07)
Positivity can transform the healthcare workplace
Positivity can transform the healthcare workplace, according to a professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2019-03-04)
Psychiatry: Case notes indicate impending seclusion
Using notes made by the attending healthcare professionals about psychiatric patients enables impending coercive measures to be predicted in advance -- potentially even through automated text analysis. (2019-02-28)
Infectious diseases could be diagnosed with smartphones in sub-Saharan Africa
A new Imperial-led review has outlined how health workers could use existing phones to predict and curb the spread of infectious diseases. (2019-02-27)
Surgery for uncomplicated appendicitis in adults is effective and safe
There has been a growing debate over whether uncomplicated appendicitis should be treated with antibiotics rather than surgery. (2019-02-25)
ICHE Roundup: Unnecessary urine tests, surgical infections, nurses' role in stewardship
Brief summaries of embargoed studies that to publish in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, including preventing unnecessary urine tests and treatment, surgical site infections come from patients' microbiome, and nurses role in antibiotic stewardship. (2019-02-21)
Side-effects not fully reported in more than 30 percent of healthcare reviews
The potential side-effects of health interventions were not fully reported in more than a third of published health study reviews, research at the University of York has shown. (2019-02-06)
Government payment policies tied to hospital performance fail to improve patient safety
Value-based incentive programs (VBIPs) aim to drive improvements in quality and reduce costs by linking financial incentives or penalties to hospital performance. (2019-02-05)
New study shows cost effectiveness of early cancer surveillance
New research published today in the journal Pediatric Blood and Cancer shows how early cancer screening and surveillance in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) results in additional years of life, and is cost effective for third-party payers. (2019-02-04)
Medical experts restore movement and autonomic function in patients with complete paralysis
There are more than 290,000 people estimated to be living in the United States with a spinal cord injury. (2019-01-31)
Why it's so important to have a primary care doctor
Americans with primary care received significantly more high-value care -- such as recommended cancer screenings and flu shots -- and reported better patient experience and healthcare access, compared to those without primary care, according to a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine. (2019-01-28)
Less than half of US youth discuss sensitive topics with their doctors
Fewer than half of young people in the United States are having discussions of sensitive topics with their regular healthcare providers, according to a new study published in Pediatrics. (2019-01-16)
UMN researchers describe need for health systems to improve care of gender non-binary patients
A perspective piece authored by UMN Medical School researchers and published in the New England Journal of Medicine uncovers significant healthcare disparities for individuals who identify as neither male nor female or may not identify as having a gender. (2019-01-07)
Holocaust survivors had higher rates of chronic conditions, lower rates of death
Holocaust survivors had higher rates of chronic conditions but lower rates of death than a comparison group of individuals insured by the same healthcare services organization in Israel. (2019-01-04)
ECDC: Influenza vaccination coverage rates insufficient across EU member states
None of the European Union (EU) Member States could demonstrate that they reach the EU target of 75 percent influenza vaccination coverage for vulnerable groups, according to a new report from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). (2018-12-18)
The home healthcare frontier: new study explores nurses' knowledge attitudes toward infection control
Home healthcare workers' beliefs about infection prevention influence whether they comply with prevention protocols more than their actual knowledge of how to comply, according to new research published in the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC), the journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC). (2018-12-13)
Veterans health administration hospitals outperform non-VHA hospitals in most markets
In a new study, researchers from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the White River Junction VA Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont, used the most current publicly available data to compare health outcomes for VA and non-VA hospitals within 121 local healthcare markets that included both a VA medical center and a non-VA hospital. (2018-12-10)
Rural youth with mild head injuries face higher medical costs but get less care
Families of rural children with mild head injuries pay more for medical care and get less of it, a Washington State University analysis has found. (2018-12-03)
Self-assessing back pain by app just as effective as traditional methods, study shows
Patients can assess their own back pain using an app on their phone or tablet as effectively as current paper methods, a new study from the University of Warwick has shown. (2018-11-28)
Ambulances in Syria deliberately and repeatedly targeted as part of war tactics
Syrian government and Russian armed forces have deliberately and repeatedly targeted ambulances in Syria as part of the Assad regime's strategy to destabilise and intimidate through the 'weaponisation of healthcare,' reveals research published in the online journal BMJ Global Health. (2018-11-27)
Vaginal problems diminish quality of life but often go unreported
With symptoms such as dryness, burning, or itching of the vagina, vulvovaginal atrophy is estimated to affect up to 98 percent of postmenopausal women, many of whom will fail to report symptoms to their healthcare providers or seek help. (2018-11-14)
Patient engagement as a new blockbuster drug, not quite yet, study finds
A team of researchers from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the Berkeley School of Public Health at UC Berkeley recently conducted a study designed to better understand how patient engagement and activation (PAE) practices are being integrated into clinical practice. (2018-11-14)
Wishes help keep pediatric patients out of the hospital
In the retrospective study patients granted a wish were 2.5 times more likely to have fewer unplanned hospital admissions and 1.9 times more likely not to have to use the emergency department. (2018-11-13)
33,000 people die every year due to infections with antibiotic-resistant bacteria
An ECDC study estimates the burden of five types of infections caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria of public health concern in the European Union and in the European Economic Area (EU/EEA). (2018-11-06)
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