Current Healthy Food News and Events

Current Healthy Food News and Events, Healthy Food News Articles.
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Families have high awareness of healthy eating but struggle to access good food
Low-income families have a high awareness of healthy diets but can't afford good quality and nutritious food, new research shows. (2021-02-23)

Actively preparing or watching others prepare food can lead to eating more
Food preparation (both actively preparing food yourself as well as watching others) can lead to eating more, a new study in the journal Appetite reports. Researchers believe this could lead to weight gain or -- depending on an individual's diet -- could be a useful way to get people to eat more healthily. (2021-02-23)

Toddler sleep patterns matter
Lauren Covington, an assistant professor in the University of Delaware School of Nursing, found that children with inconsistent sleep schedules have higher body mass index (BMI) percentiles. Her research also found that children from households with greater poverty had more overall inconsistent sleep onset times. But for families living in poverty, consistent bedtime scheduling may not be easily done, especially if a caregiver is the only parent, juggling multiple jobs, parenting multiple children or dealing with a tenuous housing situation. (2021-02-22)

Suggesting healthy food 'swaps' to online shoppers may reduce the calories they buy
Suggesting healthy food 'swaps' to online shopping customers may effectively reduce the calories they buy, according to simulation study. (2021-02-17)

FSU College of Medicine researcher develops new possibilities to prevent sudden cardiac death
Stephen Chelko, an assistant professor of biomedical sciences at the Florida State University College of Medicine, has developed a better understanding of the pathological characteristics behind arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, as well as promising avenues for prevention. (2021-02-17)

How healthy lifestyle behaviours can improve cholesterol profiles
Combining healthy lifestyle interventions reduces heart disease through beneficial effects on different lipoproteins and associated cholesterols, according to a study published February 9 in eLife. (2021-02-16)

Why portraying humans as healthy machines can backfire
Confronting consumers with expectations to be ''machine-like'' can be risky if not aligned with their abilities. (2021-02-11)

Lifestyle changes in pregnant women affected babies' genes
A study led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden showed a connection between lifestyle intervention in pregnant women with obesity and epigenetic alterations in the baby. The study is published in the journal Diabetes. (2021-02-11)

A study analyses breakfast-related advertising in Mediterranean countries
According to the Breakfast Food Advertisements in Mediterranean Countries: Products' Sugar Content in Adverts from 2015 to 2019 report produced by UOC Faculty of Information and Communication Sciences professor and researcher, Mireia MontaƱa, the majority of breakfast products marketed for children contain three times as much sugar as those aimed at adults, influencing their choices for one of the most important meals of the day. (2021-02-11)

Once bitten, twice shy: the neurology of why one bad curry could put us off for life
A negative experience with food usually leaves us unable to stomach the thought of eating that particular dish again. Using sugar-loving snails as models, researchers at the University of Sussex believe these bad experiences could be causing a switch in our brains, which impacts our future eating habits. (2021-02-11)

RUDN University veterinarians tested a new drug against pneumonia in calves
Respiratory tract diseases in young animals of the cattle are a big issue for world agriculture and food safety because a bacterium that causes them is resistant to most antibiotics. A team of veterinarians from RUDN University developed and tested a complex preparation called gentaminoseleferon that could help treat respiratory infection in calves. (2021-02-10)

Electric cable bacteria breathe oxygen with unheard efficiency
Electric cable bacteria breathe oxygen with unheard efficiency. Ten years ago, researchers at Aarhus University, Denmark, reported the discovery of centimeter-long cable bacteria, that live by conducting an electric current from one end to the other. Now the researchers document that a few cells operate with extremely high oxygen consumption while the rest of the cells process food and grow without oxygen. An outstanding way of life. (2021-02-10)

Mobile game that uses implicit learning improved children's short-term food choices
A new study examined how Indian 10- and 11-year-olds' food choices were affected by playing a pediatric dietary mobile game that uses implicit learning--educating players without making them aware of the lessons through innovations in neurocognitive training and immersive technology. The study found that the game significantly improved children's food choices immediately after play. (2021-02-10)

Peanut allergy affects even more U.S. adults than children
Peanut allergy affects at least 4.5 million adults in the U.S., many of whom report developing their first allergy symptoms during adulthood. Although three out of four Americans with peanut allergy are over 17 years old, peanut allergy is often considered a predominantly pediatric concern. There are currently no FDA-approved therapies for patients with adult-onset food allergy. (2021-02-09)

Front-of-package product names and ingredient lists of infant and toddler food can be hard to navigate
Early exposure to nutritious foods may help children develop more healthful eating habits, but package labels can make it difficult for parents to understand what they are feeding their young children, according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier. (2021-02-08)

Food waste researcher: We must learn that brown fruit isn't bad fruit
We tend to avoid choosing apples with brown spots, assuming that they taste bad. But if we are to end food waste, we'll need to upend that assumption. UCPH researcher emphasizes that there's nothing wrong with oddly shaped or bruised apples. (2021-02-08)

Microbiota transfer therapy for autism: Multi-omic approaches and lessons learned
Recent studies in mice and humans have revealed intriguing links between the composition of gut microbiota and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), a disease believed to affect one in 54 children, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Dr. Krajmalnik-Brown's lecture will propose linkages between gut bacteria and ASD, highlighting encouraging results of a microbiome-targeted, ASD open-label clinical trial. (2021-02-08)

Technion researchers discover new pathway for attacking cancer cells
The folate cycle is a process essential to DNA and RNA production. As a result, it is highly important to both cancer cells and healthy cells. Because DNA production is a critical stage in cell division, and thus in tumor growth, the folate cycle is a common target for chemotherapy. However, for the very same reason, there are significant side effects to attacking it. (2021-02-05)

Sweden ahead of Denmark in the public sector organic food race
Sweden takes first, Denmark second and Norway lags at the bottom when it comes to how much organic food is served in canteens, kindergartens and other public sector workplaces across the three Nordic nations. This, according to the results of a new report by the University of Copenhagen. The report details plenty of potential for expanding the conversion to organic food service in the Danish public sector--a topic of discussion across the EU at the moment. (2021-02-04)

Spicy perfection isn't to prevent infection
Spicy food is considered an example of ''Darwinian gastronomy'': selection for antimicrobial ingredients to counter infection risk. By analysing over thirty thousand recipes, we show that average number of spices per recipe is more strongly associated with socioeconomic factors than infectious disease. (2021-02-04)

School gardens linked with kids eating more vegetables
Getting children to eat their vegetables can seem like an insurmountable task, but nutrition researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have found one way: school gardens and lessons on using what's grown in them. Researchers worked with 16 elementary schools across Central Texas to install vegetable gardens and teach classes to students and parents about nutrition and cooking and published the results study in the International Journal for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. (2021-02-04)

Ensuring healthy family mealtimes is important - and complicated
Mealtimes are a central aspect of family life, affecting the health and wellbeing of both children and adults. Although the benefits of healthy mealtimes are straightforward, helping all families realize those benefits is quite complicated, new research from University of Illinois shows. (2021-02-04)

Scientists extract pigments from algae for food supplements
In the framework of the Chlorella microalgae cultivation process, the researchers obtained microalgae biomass with a high content of carotenoid pigments, which is suitable for the food industry through targeted cultivation. (2021-02-04)

Study finds childhood diet has lifelong impact
Eating too much fat and sugar as a child can alter your microbiome for life, even if you later learn to eat healthier, a new UC Riverside study in mice suggests. (2021-02-03)

Feed Fido fresh human-grade dog food to scoop less poop
For decades, kibble has been our go-to diet for dogs. But the dog food marketplace has exploded in recent years, with grain-free, fresh, and now human-grade offerings crowding the shelves. All commercial dog foods must meet standards for complete and balanced nutrition, so how do consumers know what to choose? (2021-02-03)

Much to glean when times are rough
Stable seafood consumption amongst the world's poorer coastal communities depends on their local habitat characteristics, which influences how they fish at different times of the year. (2021-02-01)

Alpine plants at risk of extinction following disappearing glaciers
Nearly a quarter of Italian alpine plant species are threatened by glacier retreat, according to a new study from Stanford University. Glaciers around the world are predicted to disappear within the next decade and the consequences for the plants, animals and societies surrounding them are still uncertain. By combining historical records, current surveys and computational models, the researchers' findings may help guide conservation efforts. (2021-01-29)

COVID unemployment assistance puts food on the table: BU study
Another wave of COVID-19 is putting millions out of work, while tens of millions more remain unemployed, and Congress debates aid. Now, a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study shows that unemployment help directly translates to people being able to put food on the table. (2021-01-29)

Food export restrictions by a few countries could skyrocket global food crop prices
Recent events such as the Covid-19 pandemic, locust infestations, drought and labour shortages have disrupted food supply chains, endangering food security in the process. A recent study published in Nature Food shows that trade restrictions and stockpiling of supplies by a few key countries could create global food price spikes and severe local food shortages during times of threat. (2021-01-28)

Healthy lifespan analysis using nematodes
Researchers have developed an automated measurement system to assess healthy lifespan using nematodes. This system performs a mini-population analysis to classify specific populations of nematodes based on qualitative differences in lifespan. Since there are many similarities between the mechanisms that determine the lifespan of nematodes and humans, this system could make it easier to develop drugs and find foods that extend the healthy lifespan of humans. (2021-01-27)

New study: Which beverages burst with umami potential?
In a new and first of its kind study, University of Copenhagen researchers study fermented beverages to find the one with the most umami flavour. Which one wins--champagne, beer, wine or sake? A UCPH researcher answers below. (2021-01-27)

Putting bugs on the menu, safely
The thought of eating insects is stomach turning for many, but new Edith Cowan University (ECU) research is shedding light on allergy causing proteins which could pose serious health risks for those suffering from shellfish allergy. The research, published in the journal Food Chemistry, identified 20 proteins found in cricket food products which could cause serious allergic reactions. (2021-01-27)

New research: Monitoring online posts by consumers could help improve food safety
An estimated 48 million cases of foodborne illness are contracted in the U.S annually, causing about 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths, according to CDC. In some instances, the source is well known, but 80 percent of food poisoning cases are of unknown origin. In a new study published by the journal Risk Analysis, proposes a new Food Safety Monitoring System that utilizes consumer comments posted on websites to identify products associated with food-related illnesses. (2021-01-26)

Race plays a role in children's food allergies
Black children have significantly higher rates of shellfish and fish allergies than white children, confirming that race plays an important role in how children are affected by food allergies, researchers at Rush University Medical Center have found. (2021-01-26)

Study recommends rugby league invests in young players' diets
New QUT study recommends NRL rugby league clubs 'invest' in young players' diets to aid performance and recovery with the research outlining specific nutritional needs for the high-impact sport. (2021-01-22)

School-made lunch 'better' for children
Packing a lunchbox with fruit, sandwiches, and snacks is common practice for most Australian families. But what if there was another way? Flinders University researchers investigating the pros and cons of school-provided lunches say uniform delivery of lunchtime food at school could be a solution to better childhood nutrition and learning in Australia. (2021-01-21)

Food insecurity spiked during early months of pandemic
Food insecurity grew by nearly 80 percent in two African American neighborhoods during the early months of the coronavirus pandemic, erasing nearly a decade of progress in closing disparities between the communities and the national at large. (2021-01-21)

Late rainy season reliably predicts drought in regions prone to food insecurity
The onset date of the yearly rainy season reliably predicts if seasonal drought will occur in parts of Sub-Saharan Africa that are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity, and could help to mitigate its effects. Shraddhanand Shukla and colleagues at the University of California, Santa Barbara's Climate Hazards Center, present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on January 20, 2021. (2021-01-20)

Researchers study what happens to your body during tailgating
Football watch parties are synonymous with eating fatty foods and drinking alcohol. Have you ever wondered what all of that eating and drinking does to your body? Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine simulated a tailgating situation with a small group of overweight but healthy men and examined the impact of the eating and drinking on their livers using blood tests and a liver scan. (2021-01-20)

Treating moms with postpartum depression helps their babies' brains
For the study 40 infants of women diagnosed with postpartum depression were matched with 40 infants of non-depressed mothers on infant age, gender and socioeconomic status. The mothers with postpartum depression received nine weeks of group CBT. The infants were all tested before the treatment and nine weeks later, including a questionnaire on the infant behaviour completed by the mother and her partner. (2021-01-20)

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