Current Heart Attack News and Events

Current Heart Attack News and Events, Heart Attack News Articles.
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Parasitic plants conspire to keep hosts alive
The plant that encourages kissing at Christmas is in fact a parasite, and new research reveals mistletoe has an unusual feeding strategy. When two mistletoes invade the same tree, they increase photosynthesis to get the nutrients they need, essentially sharing the tree and causing it less harm. (2021-02-23)

Fat cells may influence how the body reacts to heart failure, study shows
University of Alberta researchers have found that limiting the amount of fat the body releases into the bloodstream from fat cells when in heart failure could help improve outcomes for patients. (2021-02-23)

Long-term exposure to low levels of air pollution increases risk of heart and lung disease
Analysis of records for more than 63 million Medicare enrollees from 2000 to 2016 finds long-term exposure to air pollution had a significant impact on the number of people hospitalized for cardiac and respiratory conditions. Researchers examined three components of air pollution: fine particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide and ozone. Even levels lower than national standards affected heart and respiratory illnesses. (2021-02-22)

Structured exercise program, not testosterone therapy improved men's artery health
A 12-week, structured exercise program improved artery health and function in men ages 50 to 70 years old who had low to normal testosterone levels before the program began. Adding testosterone therapy to exercise or testosterone therapy alone did not improve artery health or function. (2021-02-22)

Female heart disease patients with female physicians fare better
Female physicians have better patient outcomes compared with their male peers, while female patients are less likely to receive guideline-recommended care when treated by a male physician, according to a systematic review from the American College of Cardiology's Cardiovascular Disease in Women section published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2021-02-22)

Periodontal disease increases risk of major cardiovascular events
People with periodontitis are at higher risk of experiencing major cardiovascular events, according to new research from Forsyth Institute and Harvard University scientists and colleagues. (2021-02-21)

Real world data on hospital readmissions of patients with heart failure
In an analysis of information on 448 patients with heart failure who were discharged from a hospital in Sweden, 20.3% of patients were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days, and 60.9% were readmitted within 1 year. The ESC Heart Failure analysis found that most of the patients who needed to be rehospitalized were readmitted for heart failure. (2021-02-18)

Study finds risk factor for blood clots occurs in more than 10 percent of transgender men using testosterone
A potentially dangerous side effect of testosterone therapy for transgender men is an increase in red blood cells that can raise the risk of blood clots, heart attack or stroke, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2021-02-18)

Stents or bypass surgery more effective for stable patients with high-risk cardiac anatomy
A study by University of Alberta cardiologists at the Canadian VIGOUR Centre shows that a particular group of patients with stable ischemic heart disease have better outcomes with percutaneous coronary intervention (also called angioplasty with stent) or coronary artery bypass surgery and medication, versus conservative management with medication alone. (2021-02-18)

FSU College of Medicine researcher develops new possibilities to prevent sudden cardiac death
Stephen Chelko, an assistant professor of biomedical sciences at the Florida State University College of Medicine, has developed a better understanding of the pathological characteristics behind arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, as well as promising avenues for prevention. (2021-02-17)

Radiomics shows cocaine fuels coronary artery disease risk
Radiomics--the extraction of very detailed quantitative features from medical images--provides a refined understanding of how cocaine use and other risk factors affect the course of coronary artery disease, according to a new study. Researchers said the study shows the power of radiomics to improve understanding of not just cardiovascular disease, but cancer and other conditions as well. (2021-02-16)

Drinking, smoking, and drug use linked to premature heart disease in the young
Recreational drinking, smoking, and drug use is linked to premature heart disease in young people, particularly younger women, finds research published online in the journal Heart. (2021-02-15)

Women have a lower range of 'normal' blood pressure than men
A new study from the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai shows that women have a lower ''normal'' blood pressure range compared to men. The findings were published today in the peer-reviewed journal Circulation. (2021-02-15)

Research highlights ways to protect astronaut cardiovascular health from space radiation
In the inky blackness of space an invisible threat is ever present - radiation. It can have a huge array of negative effects on astronaut health, including cardiovascular disease. However, if we are ever to journey to the red planet, we will need to understand and reduce this risk. A new review charts a course through what we know about the cardiovascular risks of space radiation, and the best ways to protect space travelers. (2021-02-12)

Instant death from heart attack more common in people who do not exercise
An active lifestyle is linked with a lower chance of dying immediately from a heart attack, according to a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Heart disease is the leading cause of death globally and prevention is a major public health priority. (2021-02-12)

Heart disease deaths rising in young women
A nationwide US study has found increasing death rates from heart disease in women under 65. The research is published in European Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1 The study found that while death rates from cancer declined every year between 1999 and 2018, after an initial drop, heart disease death rates have been rising since 2010. (2021-02-10)

Long-term stress linked to increased risk of heart attack
Can long-term stress lead to heart attacks? Most people would probably answer in the affirmative, but the scientific evidence of this is scarce. A new study by researchers from Linköping University in Sweden reveals that the levels of the stress hormone cortisol were increased in the months preceding a heart attack. The results, published in Scientific Reports, suggest that long-term stress is a risk factor for heart attacks. (2021-02-10)

Texas A&M researchers discover energy drinks' harmful effects on heart
A team of researchers, led by a Texas A&M University professor, has found that some energy drinks have adverse effects on the muscle cells of the heart. (2021-02-10)

Higher blood pressure over life span increases congestive heart failure risk in Black people
Starting with early childhood, otherwise healthy Black people show signs of slightly diminished heart muscle strength and a slightly higher blood pressure than their white counterparts, factors which may put them on a course for early development of congestive heart failure, Medical College of Georgia researchers report. (2021-02-08)

Deepfake detectors can be defeated, computer scientists show for the first time
Systems designed to detect deepfakes --videos that manipulate real-life footage via artificial intelligence--can be deceived, computer scientists showed for the first time at the WACV 2021 conference which took place online Jan. 5 to 9, 2021. Researchers showed detectors can be defeated by inserting inputs called adversarial examples into every video frame. The adversarial examples are slightly manipulated inputs which cause artificial intelligence systems such as machine learning models to make a mistake. (2021-02-08)

Lockdown linked to drop in asthma attacks, GP data suggests
Asthma attack rates seen at GP surgeries in England fell significantly during the first Covid-19 pandemic lockdown of 2020, a study suggests. (2021-02-08)

Drinking green tea, coffee lowers risk of death for stroke and heart attack survivors
Stroke survivors who drank seven or more cups of green tea each day lowered their risks of multiple causes of death by 62%. Drinking one cup of coffee each day lowered the risks of death for heart attack survivors and for those without a history of stroke or heart attack. (2021-02-04)

Uncovering a link between inflammation and heart disease
Patients with cardiac disease often have chronic inflammation that damages their hearts, even with no infection present. A new study published in Circulation reveals a mechanism that is activating T cells, a type of immune cell, and causing inflammation in the heart. (2021-02-04)

Women at higher-risk of fatal, nightime cardiac arrest
A new Cedars-Sinai study shows that during nighttime hours, women are more likely than men to suffer sudden death due to cardiac arrest. The findings were published in the journal Heart Rhythm. (2021-02-03)

Iron release may contribute to cell death in heart failure
A process that releases iron in response to stress may contribute to heart failure, and blocking this process could be a way of protecting the heart, suggests a study in mice published today in eLife. (2021-02-02)

Hydrogen-producing enzyme protects itself against oxygen
Hydrogen-producing enzymes are beacons of hope in biohydrogen research. However, they are so vulnerable to oxygen in the air that it has not been possible to exploit their potential on a larger scale. The recently discovered [FeFe]-hydrogenase CbA5H from the bacterium Clostridium beijerinckii resists the oxygen attack. (2021-02-02)

Study links intensive BP lowering to reduced CV risk in patients exposed to air pollution
In the study 'The Benefits of Intensive Versus Standard Blood Pressure Treatment According to Fine Particulate Matter Air Pollution Exposure' published this week in the journal Hypertension, researchers at University Hospitals (UH) and Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) School of Medicine found intensive BP lowering is effective in reducing cardiovascular risk in patients exposed to high levels of air pollution. (2021-02-01)

Researchers map heart recovery after heart attack with great detail
Researchers from the Hubrecht Institute mapped the recovery of the heart after a heart attack with great detail. They found that cardiomyocytes play an important role in the intracellular communication after a heart attack. The researchers documented their findings in a database that is accessible for scientists around the world. This brings the research field a step closer to the development of therapies for improved recovery after heart injury. (2021-01-29)

Automated AI algorithm uses routine imaging to predict cardiovascular risk
Investigators teamed up to develop and evaluate a deep learning system that may help change this. The system automatically measures coronary artery calcium from CT scans to help physicians and patients make more informed decisions about cardiovascular prevention. (2021-01-29)

Leading cardiovascular organizations call for urgent action to reduce air pollution
Air pollution is a key risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and a major contributor to the global burden of disease. Long-term exposure to air pollution has also been linked to an increased risk of death from COVID-19. This dangerous 'triple threat' of air pollution, COVID-19 and cardiovascular disease should be taken seriously, warn major health authorities. (2021-01-28)

Exercise-based cardiac rehab added to stroke recovery improved strength, cardiac endurance
In a small study, stroke survivors who completed a three-month cardiac rehabilitation program focused on aerobic exercise significantly improved their physical endurance and strength. Six months after the program more, 83.3% of participants reported that they continued exercising at least once a week. (2021-01-27)

Breakthrough design at UBCO vastly improves mechanical heart valve
New research coming out of UBC's Okanagan campus may take the current 'gold standard' for heart valves to a new level of reliability. A team of researchers at UBCO's Heart Valve Performance Lab (HVPL) has developed a way to improve overall blood flow through the valves, so the design of mechanical heart valves will more closely match the real thing. (2021-01-26)

Hypertension symptoms in women often mistaken for menopause
Pregnancy complications and early menopause increase women's future risk of heart disease. Cardiologists, gynaecologists and endocrinologists recommend how to help middle-aged women prevent later heart problems in a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) consensus document published today in European Heart Journal, a journal of the ESC. ''Physicians should intensify the detection of hypertension in middle-aged women,'' states the document. (2021-01-26)

Fungi strengthen plants to fend off aphids
Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have demonstrated that unique fungi strengthen the ''immune systems'' of wheat and bean plants against aphids. Fungi enter and influence the amount of a plant's own defences, resulting in fewer aphids. The results could serve to reduce agricultural insecticide use and bring Denmark a step further along the path towards its green transition. (2021-01-22)

Predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1266, Zhuzhi Wen, Jingying Hou, Zun Mai, Huifen Huang, Yangxin Chen, Dengfeng Geng and Jingfeng Wang from Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China and Guandong Province Key Laboratory of Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, Guangzhou, China consider predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope. (2021-01-22)

New study on the role of monocytes in sarcoidosis
The cause of the inflammatory lung disease sarcoidosis is unknown. In a new study, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have investigated whether a type of immune cell called a monocyte could be a key player in sarcoidosis pathogenesis and explain why some patients develop more severe and chronic disease than others. The study, which is published in The European Respiratory Journal, opens new possibilities for future diagnostic and therapeutic methods. (2021-01-21)

Counting patients social determinants of health may help doctors avert fatal heart attacks
Doctors may be able to predict their patients' risks of fatal coronary heart disease more accurately by taking into account the number of adverse social factors affecting them, according to a new study led by researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian. (2021-01-21)

Mayo Clinic study indicates age influences sex-related outcomes after heart attack
Approximately 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes occur every year in men and women in the US Sex and age play a large part in who experiences a heart attack, the methods used to treat these heart attacks, and the eventual post hospital outcomes of the people who experience heart attacks. Mayo Clinic researchers discuss these sex and age differences in study findings published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2021-01-20)

Study finds COVID-19 attack on brain, not lungs, triggers severe disease in mice
Georgia State University biology researchers have found that infecting the nasal passages of mice with the virus that causes COVID-19 led to a rapid, escalating attack on the brain that triggered severe illness, even after the lungs were successfully clearing themselves of the virus. (2021-01-19)

Heart attack patients in England 'fearful' of seeking medical help amid COVID crisis
Data analysis is revealing a second sharp drop in the number of people admitted to hospital in England with acute heart failure or a heart attack. The decline began in October, as the numbers of COVID-19 infections began to surge ahead of the second lockdown, which came into force in early November. (2021-01-19)

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