Current Heart Failure News and Events | Page 25

Current Heart Failure News and Events, Heart Failure News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
New targets for ischemic drugs found
Russian scientists investigated the role of opioid receptors in protecting the heart from coronary disease: the lack of its blood supply. These receptors are mainly responsible for pain regulation. It turned out that they significantly affect the mechanism of cardioprotection. The results of the work can help to develop new drugs for ischemia. The study was published in Physiological Research. (2019-02-25)

The importance of sex-specific strategies for prevention, treatment of heart failure in women
There are many important differences between women and men with heart failure, highlighting the importance of sex-specific strategies for prevention and treatment, according to three papers publishing today in JACC: Heart Failure. This special focus issue will explore heart failure in women. (2019-02-25)

New research casts doubt on cause of Angkor's collapse
New University of Sydney research has revealed the ancient Cambodian city of Angkor underwent a gradual decline in occupation rather than an abrupt collapse. (2019-02-25)

Study links Celebrex, heart valve calcification after earlier research declared drug safe
On National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day, Vanderbilt study disputes that Celebrex has no more impact on valves than older drugs in its class. (2019-02-22)

Scientists unravel genetic basis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in Finns
One third of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy cases in Finland are caused by one of the four major mutations, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital shows. Overall, 40 percent of patients carried a specific or a likely mutation causing the disease, and 20 percent were carriers of a rare gene mutation whose role in the disease remains unknown. (2019-02-22)

New 2019 guidelines for patients with atrial fibrillation
Lin Yee Chen, MD, MS, Associate Professor with Tenure, Cardiovascular Division, in the Department of Medicine with the University of Minnesota Medical School was part of a Writing Committee tasked with updating the 2014 guidelines for patients with AFib. The 2019 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Heart Rhythm Society Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Atrial Fibrillation were just published as the standard for the management of Afib in the U.S. (2019-02-22)

Why a blow to the chest can kill or save you
It is still a mystery why a blow to the chest can kill some people yet save others. We may be one step closer to an answer, however, thanks to a device developed by researchers at EPFL and the University of Bern that can replicate the experience in the laboratory. (2019-02-21)

Scientists discover new type of immune cells that are essential for forming heart valves
UCLA researchers have identified for the first time the origin of an immune cell that plays a critical role in the formation of healthy heart valves. The findings could pave the way for new treatments for heart valve disorders, which can be caused by congenital defects, aging or disease. (2019-02-21)

10 percent of Chinese adults have high heart disease risk, aren't treated for it
Researchers at Yale and at the National Center for Cardiovascular Disease in China just quantified a significant opportunity to improve Chinese heart health: 1 in 10 middle-aged Chinese adults are at high risk for heart disease, yet only about 3 percent of those at-risk are taking either statins or aspirin, the recommended therapies for managing that risk. This study was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine. (2019-02-21)

Risks of shoulder replacement surgery higher than previously thought
The risks associated with shoulder replacement surgery for arthritic conditions are higher than previously estimated, particularly for people under 60 and over 85 years old, finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2019-02-20)

Physically active women have significantly decreased risk of heart disease
Women with lower sedentary time or who frequently interrupt their sitting have a significantly lower risk of heart disease. Younger women are having more heart attacks than younger men. (2019-02-19)

Report reveals more than a million Australian heart patients not given a second chance
A new report, developed by the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, reveals that prevention of secondary heart attacks and strokes is critical to combating Australia's number one killer -- cardiovascular disease. It highlights the critical and timely opportunity to invest in secondary prevention in Australia. (2019-02-19)

Diabetes mellitus and stable ischemic heart disease
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications, Cody Schwartz and David Winchester from the Malcom Randall VAMC, Gainesville, Fla., USA consider diabetes mellitus and stable ischemic heart disease. (2019-02-16)

Stable ischemic heart disease in the older adult
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications, Juan R. Vilaro from the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla., USA considers stable ischemic heart disease in the older adult. (2019-02-16)

OSA patients with excessive daytime sleepiness at greatest risk of cardiovascular disease
Adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who experience excessive sleepiness while awake appear to be at far greater risk for cardiovascular diseases than those without excessive daytime sleepiness, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2019-02-15)

Blood clot discovery could pave way for treatment of blood diseases
Scientists have discovered new ways in which the body regulates blood clots, in a discovery which could one day lead to the development of better treatments that could help prevent and treat conditions including heart diseases, stroke and vascular dementia. (2019-02-15)

CVIA special issue on stable ischemic heart disease
The journal Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA) has just published a new issue, Volume 3 Issue 3. This is a Special Issue on Stable Ischemic Heart Disease. (2019-02-15)

Finding suggests ways to promote adult heart tissue regeneration
Researchers report that they have been able to remove the 'breaks' that hold back cardiomyocyte proliferation, opening the possibility for treating heart disease by reprogramming adult cardiomyocytes to a more fetal cell state. (2019-02-14)

Should we screen people for irregular heartbeat?
Should we screen people for irregular heartbeat (known as atrial fibrillation, or AF for short) in an effort to prevent strokes? Experts debate the issue in The BMJ today. (2019-02-13)

Only 'modest' improvement in heart failure survival rates since 2000
Survival after a diagnosis of heart failure in the United Kingdom has shown only modest improvement in the 21st century and lags behind other serious conditions, such as cancer, finds a large study published by The BMJ today. (2019-02-13)

New research insights hold promise for kids with DMD
Prednisone, the current standard of care used to treat kids with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), reduces chronic inflammation but has harsh side effects. Eplerenone, a heart failure drug, is used in older patients to treat cardiomyopathy, a leading cause of mortality for people with DMD. A new medicine under development appears to combine the beneficial effects of these drugs for the heart and muscle while also showing improved safety in experimental models. (2019-02-11)

Is it better to have a heart attack while traveling or at home?
Is it better to have a heart attack while travelling or at home? Find out at Acute Cardiovascular Care 2019. The annual congress of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association, a branch of the European Society of Cardiology, will be held March 2-4 at the Palacio de Ferias y Congresos de Malaga in Malaga, Spain. Explore the scientific program to see the innovations that will guide practice. (2019-02-08)

Removing more blood via minimally invasive surgery more likely to improve hemorrhagic stroke recover
The greater the volume of blood removed from the brain via minimally invasive surgery after a hemorrhagic stroke the greater the odds of better functional recovery. (2019-02-07)

NSAID impairs immune response in heart failure, worsens heart and kidney damage
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, are widely known as pain-killers and can relieve pain and inflammation. In a study published in the journal Life Sciences, researchers found that treatment with the NSAID carprofen alone triggered subtle low-grade inflammation in the heart and kidneys. The combination of carprofen pretreatment and heart attack magnified this impact by dysregulating the acute inflammatory response, amplifying inflammation and intensifying the cardiorenal syndrome. (2019-02-06)

In vitro grafts increase blood flow in infarcted rat hearts
Advances in stem cell research offer hope for treatments that could help patients regrow heart muscle tissue after heart attacks, a key to patients achieving more complete recoveries. Scientists today report success in creating functional blood vessels in vitro for hearts of rats that had sustained a heart attack. (2019-02-05)

Practices related to fluid volume that are important for dialysis patients' health
Certain practices in dialysis facilities related to managing fluid volume and low blood pressure during dialysis are important to patients' health and survival. (2019-02-05)

New clues discovered to lung transplant rejection
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered clues to a particularly deadly form of rejection that can follow lung transplantation. Called antibody-mediated rejection, the condition remains impervious to available treatments and difficult to diagnose. The researchers have identified, in mice, a process that may prevent the condition and lead to possible therapies to treat it. (2019-02-04)

Blood test for specific metabolites could reveal blocked arteries
A Duke Health pilot project suggests that in the near future, a blood test could show whether arteries carrying blood to the heart are narrow or blocked, a risk factor for heart disease. (2019-02-01)

Nearly half of all adult Americans have cardiovascular disease
At least 48 percent of all adults in the United States have some form of cardiovascular disease, according to the latest statistics provided by the American Heart Association. Much of the prevalence is driven by an increase in the number of people classified as having high blood pressure, following the 2017 guidelines that redefined hypertension levels to 130/80 mm Hg. (2019-01-31)

New strategy expands the benefits of Internet-delivered CBT
Scientists at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have experimented with a new adaptive treatment strategy for Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) that identifies patients within the first month who face a major risk of treatment failure. Published in the scientific journal American Journal of Psychiatry, the results also suggest that such patients may nevertheless benefit if their treatment is adjusted to accommodate their specific needs and challenges. (2019-01-30)

Counties with dirtier air have more stroke deaths
Counties with higher levels of fine particulate (PM2.5) air pollution have more stroke deaths and shorter life expectancies among their citizenry. About half of US counties have annual air pollution levels that exceed guidelines from the Environmental Protection Agency. (2019-01-30)

Stroke risk factors on the rise in Native-Americans
Stroke risk factors such as high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease and smoking are common and on the rise among Native-Americans with clot-caused stroke. (2019-01-30)

New heart valve modeling technique enables customized medical care for patients
Engineers at The University of Texas at Austin develop noninvasive way to simulate repairs to the heart's mitral valve allowing surgeons to provide patient-specific treatments. (2019-01-30)

Extremely high blood pressure in African-Americans is 5 times the national average
Extremely high blood pressure that leads to strokes, heart attacks and acute kidney damage, classified as hypertensive emergency, is five times higher in inner-city African-American patients than the national average, according to a recent study co-led by a Rutgers researcher. (2019-01-30)

Research reveals new molecular player in heart enlargement due to cardiac disease
In response to conditions such as high blood pressure and reduced blood flow to cardiac muscle, the heart can drastically enlarge (pathological hypertrophy), which preserves cardiac function in the short term but predisposes patients to intractable heart failure and sudden cardiac death if left untreated. Now, UNC School of Medicine researchers discovered the RNA-binding protein Lin28a is a crucial player in pathological hypertrophy. This finding could impact the development of more potent heart disease drugs. (2019-01-30)

Do women with breast cancer have a higher risk of atrial fibrillation?
Patients with breast cancer may have an increased incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF), say researchers. A retrospective study in Denmark has found that women with breast cancer have an increased risk of developing AF within three years following their cancer diagnosis compared with other women of the same age. The results are published in HeartRhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society and the Cardiac Electrophysiology Society. (2019-01-29)

Diabetes tops common conditions for frequent geriatric emergency patients
Older adults go to the emergency department more often than other age groups, stay longer, and typically require more resources and medical interventions. The most common conditions among geriatric frequent users include diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, congestive heart failure and blockage or damage to veins or arteries, according to new research in Annals of Emergency Medicine. (2019-01-28)

Myocarditis: Overshooting the mark
Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have shown that a protein called midkine, a member of the class of signaling molecules known as cytokines, is a key driver of inflammation in the heart muscle that can lead to heart failure in patients with myocarditis. (2019-01-28)

Bad brakes
A study in human and mouse heart cells identifies a faulty molecular brake in the most common form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young people and athletes and the most common genetic disease of the heart The faulty brake, found about a quarter of all genetic mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, interferes with the heart muscle's ability to contract and relax,. Treatment with a chemical compound successfully restores normal contractility and relaxation in human heart cells (2019-01-28)

Study uncovers why heart attack triggers arrhythmia in some, explores potential treatment
A team of researchers led by the University of California San Diego has identified a genetic pathway that causes some individuals to develop an abnormal heart rhythm, or arrhythmia, after experiencing a heart attack. They have also identified a drug candidate that can block this pathway. (2019-01-28)

Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.