Current Heart Muscle News and Events

Current Heart Muscle News and Events, Heart Muscle News Articles.
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Fat cells may influence how the body reacts to heart failure, study shows
University of Alberta researchers have found that limiting the amount of fat the body releases into the bloodstream from fat cells when in heart failure could help improve outcomes for patients. (2021-02-23)

Give the heart a ketone? It may be beneficial
There is growing evidence that ketone bodies may be beneficial to heart disease patients regardless of the method of delivery used to increase ketone delivery to the heart. A Journal of the American College of Cardiology review paper examines emerging evidence regarding ketone bodies' effects on the heart and the potential for ketone therapy as a cardiovascular intervention in heart disease patients. (2021-02-23)

Structured exercise program, not testosterone therapy improved men's artery health
A 12-week, structured exercise program improved artery health and function in men ages 50 to 70 years old who had low to normal testosterone levels before the program began. Adding testosterone therapy to exercise or testosterone therapy alone did not improve artery health or function. (2021-02-22)

New drug molecules hold promise for treating fatal child disease
Scientists have identified a way to ''rescue'' muscle cells that have genetically mutated, paving the way to a possible new treatment for rare childhood illness such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). (2021-02-22)

Hormone helps prevent muscle loss in mice on high fat diets, USC study finds
A new study suggests that a hormone known to prevent weight gain and normalize metabolism can also help maintain healthy muscles in mice. The findings present new possibilities for treating muscle-wasting conditions associated with age, obesity or cancer, according to scientists from the University of Southern California Leonard Davis School of Gerontology. (2021-02-22)

Bioengineered hybrid muscle fiber for regenerative medicine
Scientists regenerate damaged muscle tissue using cell reprogramming technology and natural-synthetic hybrid scaffold. (2021-02-21)

Real world data on hospital readmissions of patients with heart failure
In an analysis of information on 448 patients with heart failure who were discharged from a hospital in Sweden, 20.3% of patients were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days, and 60.9% were readmitted within 1 year. The ESC Heart Failure analysis found that most of the patients who needed to be rehospitalized were readmitted for heart failure. (2021-02-18)

Study reveals a new potential mechanism underlying loss of muscle mass during menopause
A new study conducted in collaboration between the universities of Minnesota (USA) and Jyväskylä (Finland) reveals that estrogen deficiency alters the microRNA signalling in skeletal muscle, which may activate signalling cascades leading to loss of muscle mass. (2021-02-18)

Stents or bypass surgery more effective for stable patients with high-risk cardiac anatomy
A study by University of Alberta cardiologists at the Canadian VIGOUR Centre shows that a particular group of patients with stable ischemic heart disease have better outcomes with percutaneous coronary intervention (also called angioplasty with stent) or coronary artery bypass surgery and medication, versus conservative management with medication alone. (2021-02-18)

Radiological images confirm 'COVID-19 can cause the body to attack itself'
Muscle soreness and achy joints are common symptoms among COVID-19 patients. But for some people, symptoms are more severe, long lasting and even bizarre, including rheumatoid arthritis flares, autoimmune myositis or 'COVID toes.' A new Northwestern Medicine study has, for the first time, confirmed and illustrated the causes of these symptoms through radiological imaging. (2021-02-17)

People with this muscle protein gene variant tolerate the cold better
A gene variant that affects muscle function may have protected humans against cold during migrations from Africa to Europe more than 50,000 years ago, suggests a study appearing February 17 in the American Journal of Human Genetics. Researchers show that deficiency of a protein called α-actinin-3 caused by a gene variant improves cold tolerance in humans by increasing muscle tone. (2021-02-17)

One in five has a mutation that provides superior resilience to cold
Almost one in five people lacks the protein α-actinin-3 in their muscle fibre. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden now show that more of the skeletal muscle of these individuals comprises slow-twitch muscle fibres, which are more durable and energy-efficient and provide better tolerance to low temperatures than fast-twitch muscle fibres. The results are published in the scientific journal The American Journal of Human Genetics. (2021-02-17)

FSU College of Medicine researcher develops new possibilities to prevent sudden cardiac death
Stephen Chelko, an assistant professor of biomedical sciences at the Florida State University College of Medicine, has developed a better understanding of the pathological characteristics behind arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, as well as promising avenues for prevention. (2021-02-17)

FRESH 3D-printing platform paves way for tissues, organs
Research into 3D bioprinting has grown rapidly in recent years as scientists seek to re-create the structure and function of complex biological systems from human tissues to entire organs. In APL Bioengineering, researchers from Carnegie Mellon University provide perspective on the Freefrom Reversible Embedding of Suspended Hydrogels 3D bioprinting approach, which solves the issue of gravity and distortion by printing within a yield-stress support bath that holds the bioinks in place until they are cured. (2021-02-16)

New surgery may enable better control of prosthetic limbs
MIT researchers in collaboration with surgeons at Harvard Medical School have devised a new type of amputation surgery that can help amputees better control their residual muscles and receive sensory feedback. This restored sense of proprioception should translate to better control of prosthetic limbs, as well as reduction of limb pain, the researchers say. (2021-02-15)

Drinking, smoking, and drug use linked to premature heart disease in the young
Recreational drinking, smoking, and drug use is linked to premature heart disease in young people, particularly younger women, finds research published online in the journal Heart. (2021-02-15)

Study finds alligator hearts keep beating no matter what
A new study reported by Georgia Tech researchers finds that an alligator heart will not fibrillate when exposed to drastic temperature changes, unlike a rabbit (mammal) heart, which is critically vulnerable to heart trauma under those conditions. The research could help better understand how the heart works and what can cause a deadly arrhythmia - which fundamentally happens when the heart doesn't pump blood correctly any longer. (2021-02-15)

Researchers identify muscle factor that controls fat metabolism
In a recent study, published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, University Hospitals (UH) Cleveland Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researchers have found that skeletal muscle significantly affects how the body stores and metabolizes fat. (2021-02-15)

Research highlights ways to protect astronaut cardiovascular health from space radiation
In the inky blackness of space an invisible threat is ever present - radiation. It can have a huge array of negative effects on astronaut health, including cardiovascular disease. However, if we are ever to journey to the red planet, we will need to understand and reduce this risk. A new review charts a course through what we know about the cardiovascular risks of space radiation, and the best ways to protect space travelers. (2021-02-12)

New research identifies biological causes of muscle weakness in later life
A new largescale genetic analysis has found biological mechanisms that contribute to making people more susceptible to muscle weakness in later life, finding that diseases such as osteoarthritis and diabetes may play a large role in susceptibility. (2021-02-11)

Cell-selective nanotherapy prevents post-angioplasty restenosis, promotes artery healing
A micro-RNA nanotherapy specifically inhibits the growth of cardiovascular smooth muscle cells and infiltrating inflammatory cells that form atherosclerotic plaques, while sparing endothelial cells that need to regrow to heal the injured artery. The investigational nanoparticles have the potential to achieve the therapeutic effects of drug-eluding stents without the risk of thrombosis and neoartheroclerosis, University of South Florida Health researchers report. (2021-02-10)

Heart disease deaths rising in young women
A nationwide US study has found increasing death rates from heart disease in women under 65. The research is published in European Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1 The study found that while death rates from cancer declined every year between 1999 and 2018, after an initial drop, heart disease death rates have been rising since 2010. (2021-02-10)

Novel protein could reverse severe muscle wasting in disease, aging and trauma
Muscle stem cells drive the tissue's growth and repair after such injuries. But growing these cells in the lab and using them to therapeutically replace damaged muscle has been frustratingly difficult. Australian researchers have discovered a factor that triggers these muscle stem cells to proliferate and heal. In a mouse model of severe muscle damage, injections of this naturally occurring protein led to the complete regeneration of muscle and the return of normal movement after severe muscle trauma. (2021-02-10)

Long-term stress linked to increased risk of heart attack
Can long-term stress lead to heart attacks? Most people would probably answer in the affirmative, but the scientific evidence of this is scarce. A new study by researchers from Linköping University in Sweden reveals that the levels of the stress hormone cortisol were increased in the months preceding a heart attack. The results, published in Scientific Reports, suggest that long-term stress is a risk factor for heart attacks. (2021-02-10)

Texas A&M researchers discover energy drinks' harmful effects on heart
A team of researchers, led by a Texas A&M University professor, has found that some energy drinks have adverse effects on the muscle cells of the heart. (2021-02-10)

Higher blood pressure over life span increases congestive heart failure risk in Black people
Starting with early childhood, otherwise healthy Black people show signs of slightly diminished heart muscle strength and a slightly higher blood pressure than their white counterparts, factors which may put them on a course for early development of congestive heart failure, Medical College of Georgia researchers report. (2021-02-08)

Drinking green tea, coffee lowers risk of death for stroke and heart attack survivors
Stroke survivors who drank seven or more cups of green tea each day lowered their risks of multiple causes of death by 62%. Drinking one cup of coffee each day lowered the risks of death for heart attack survivors and for those without a history of stroke or heart attack. (2021-02-04)

Uncovering a link between inflammation and heart disease
Patients with cardiac disease often have chronic inflammation that damages their hearts, even with no infection present. A new study published in Circulation reveals a mechanism that is activating T cells, a type of immune cell, and causing inflammation in the heart. (2021-02-04)

New clues to how muscle wasting occurs in people with cancer
Muscle wasting, or the loss of muscle tissue, is a common problem for people with cancer, but the precise mechanisms have long eluded doctors and scientists. Now, a new study led by Penn State researchers gives new clues to how muscle wasting happens on a cellular level. (2021-02-03)

Racial disparities: Young, Black adults had significantly worse heart transplant outcomes
Young, Black adults (ages 18-30) are more than twice as likely to die in the first year after a heart transplant compared to non-Black transplant recipients who are the same age. By age 61 and older, there was no significant racial disparity in the health outcomes among heart transplantation recipients. (2021-02-02)

Test for early detection of heart problems reduces risk of heart damage from chemotherapy
Results of a multi-centre, international, clinical trial co-led by Peter Munk Cardiac Centre (PMCC) cardiologist Dr. Dinesh Thavendiranathan point to the benefit of using a more sensitive test to detect heart function issues early, so cancer patients don't have to fight heart failure too. (2021-02-02)

Iron release may contribute to cell death in heart failure
A process that releases iron in response to stress may contribute to heart failure, and blocking this process could be a way of protecting the heart, suggests a study in mice published today in eLife. (2021-02-02)

Stem cell study illuminates the cause of a devastating inherited heart disorder
Penn Medicine scientists have uncovered the molecular causes of a congenital form of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)-- one of multiple congenital disorders caused by inherited mutations in a gene called LMNA. The scientists used stem cell techniques to grow human heart muscle cells containing DCM-causing mutations in LMNA. They found that these mutations severely disrupt the structural organization of DNA in the nucleus of heart muscle cells. (2021-02-01)

Researchers map heart recovery after heart attack with great detail
Researchers from the Hubrecht Institute mapped the recovery of the heart after a heart attack with great detail. They found that cardiomyocytes play an important role in the intracellular communication after a heart attack. The researchers documented their findings in a database that is accessible for scientists around the world. This brings the research field a step closer to the development of therapies for improved recovery after heart injury. (2021-01-29)

Breakthrough design at UBCO vastly improves mechanical heart valve
New research coming out of UBC's Okanagan campus may take the current 'gold standard' for heart valves to a new level of reliability. A team of researchers at UBCO's Heart Valve Performance Lab (HVPL) has developed a way to improve overall blood flow through the valves, so the design of mechanical heart valves will more closely match the real thing. (2021-01-26)

Identification of Oligo-DNA that promotes skeletal muscle differentiation
Skeletal muscle is the largest tissue in the human body and is responsible not only for locomotion but for energy metabolism and heat production. Myoblasts play an important role in maintaining muscle homeostasis, but it has been reported that the differentiation ability of myoblasts decreases with age and disease and this will be one of the causes of muscle atrophy. To prevent muscle atrophy, researchers of Shinshu University studied molecules that promote myoblast differentiation. (2021-01-25)

Genetic breakthrough to target care for deadly heart condition
New genetic faults discovered in people with a heart condition that is sometimes inherited in families could transform the diagnosis and treatment of the hidden disease, according to research funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) and published in Nature Genetics. (2021-01-25)

Finding a way to stop chemotherapy from damaging the heart
There could be an intervention on the horizon to help prevent heart damage caused by the common chemotherapy drug doxorubicin, new research suggests. (2021-01-25)

Exercising muscle combats chronic inflammation on its own
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have demonstrated that human muscle has an innate ability to ward off damaging effects of chronic inflammation when exercised. The discovery was made possible through the use of lab-grown, engineered human muscle, demonstrating the potential power of the first-of-its-kind platform in such research endeavors. (2021-01-22)

Predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1266, Zhuzhi Wen, Jingying Hou, Zun Mai, Huifen Huang, Yangxin Chen, Dengfeng Geng and Jingfeng Wang from Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China and Guandong Province Key Laboratory of Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, Guangzhou, China consider predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope. (2021-01-22)

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