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Current Heart Muscle News and Events, Heart Muscle News Articles.
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New research insights hold promise for kids with DMD
Prednisone, the current standard of care used to treat kids with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), reduces chronic inflammation but has harsh side effects. Eplerenone, a heart failure drug, is used in older patients to treat cardiomyopathy, a leading cause of mortality for people with DMD. A new medicine under development appears to combine the beneficial effects of these drugs for the heart and muscle while also showing improved safety in experimental models. (2019-02-11)

Working it out: Researchers find exercise may help fight depression in seniors
The benefits of exercise are widely known but kinesiologists at McMaster University have for the first time found that physical activity may help fight depression in seniors by stimulating muscle-generated mood boosters. (2019-02-07)

NSAID impairs immune response in heart failure, worsens heart and kidney damage
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, are widely known as pain-killers and can relieve pain and inflammation. In a study published in the journal Life Sciences, researchers found that treatment with the NSAID carprofen alone triggered subtle low-grade inflammation in the heart and kidneys. The combination of carprofen pretreatment and heart attack magnified this impact by dysregulating the acute inflammatory response, amplifying inflammation and intensifying the cardiorenal syndrome. (2019-02-06)

In their DNA: Rotator cuff stem cells more likely to develop into fat cells
Why are fat deposits more likely to occur after tears of the shoulder's rotator cuff, compared to other types of muscle injuries? An increased propensity of stem cells within with rotator cuff muscles to develop into fat cells may explain the difference, reports a study in the Feb. 6, 2019 issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. (2019-02-06)

In vitro grafts increase blood flow in infarcted rat hearts
Advances in stem cell research offer hope for treatments that could help patients regrow heart muscle tissue after heart attacks, a key to patients achieving more complete recoveries. Scientists today report success in creating functional blood vessels in vitro for hearts of rats that had sustained a heart attack. (2019-02-05)

Deaf moth evolves sound-production as a warning to outwit its predator
A genus of deaf moth has evolved to develop an extraordinary sound-producing structure in its wings to evade its primary predator the bat. The finding, made by researchers from the University of Bristol and Natural History Museum, is described in Scientific Reports today. (2019-02-05)

A study reveals that a large part of the population is not able to breathe properly
Muscle co-contraction is a strategy used commonly in elderly people to increase their stability. Co-contraction involves the simultaneous contraction of pairs of muscles from opposing groups to lock a joint and provide stability. (2019-02-04)

Gene therapy cassettes improved for muscular dystrophy
Experimental gene therapy cassettes for Duchenne muscular dystrophy have been modified to deliver better performance. The cassettes, which carry the therapy into muscle cells, contain newer versions of a miniaturized treatment gene. Earlier versions of the treatment cassettes did significantly enhance muscle function in previous lab studies, but did so incompletely. That's partly because the huge dystrophin gene has to be condensed to fit inside the transport virus. (2019-02-01)

Blood test for specific metabolites could reveal blocked arteries
A Duke Health pilot project suggests that in the near future, a blood test could show whether arteries carrying blood to the heart are narrow or blocked, a risk factor for heart disease. (2019-02-01)

Exercise may fight depression in older adults, study suggests
New research suggests that exercise-induced muscle changes could help boost mood in older adults. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology -- Cell Physiology. (2019-01-31)

Nearly half of all adult Americans have cardiovascular disease
At least 48 percent of all adults in the United States have some form of cardiovascular disease, according to the latest statistics provided by the American Heart Association. Much of the prevalence is driven by an increase in the number of people classified as having high blood pressure, following the 2017 guidelines that redefined hypertension levels to 130/80 mm Hg. (2019-01-31)

Discovery points to innovative new way to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Researchers at The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa have discovered a new way to treat the loss of muscle function caused by Duchenne muscular dystrophy in animal models of the disease. As reported in Cell Stem Cell, the team restored muscle stem cell function that is impaired in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, resulting in efficient regeneration of the muscle and preventing the progressive loss of muscle strength characteristic of the disease. (2019-01-31)

Self-growing materials that strengthen in response to force
A strategy inspired by the process responsible for muscle growth could lead to the development of stronger, longer-lasting materials. (2019-01-31)

Research reveals new molecular player in heart enlargement due to cardiac disease
In response to conditions such as high blood pressure and reduced blood flow to cardiac muscle, the heart can drastically enlarge (pathological hypertrophy), which preserves cardiac function in the short term but predisposes patients to intractable heart failure and sudden cardiac death if left untreated. Now, UNC School of Medicine researchers discovered the RNA-binding protein Lin28a is a crucial player in pathological hypertrophy. This finding could impact the development of more potent heart disease drugs. (2019-01-30)

Train harder, for less time
New research, published in Experimental Physiology by researchers from the University of Glasgow, has highlighted several of the positive health effects of a short duration, high-intensity resistance exercise training program in overweight men. The findings of this study suggest that a six week program consisting of three 15-minute sessions per week dramatically improves insulin sensitivity, as well as muscle size and strength in this population. (2019-01-29)

Myocarditis: Overshooting the mark
Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have shown that a protein called midkine, a member of the class of signaling molecules known as cytokines, is a key driver of inflammation in the heart muscle that can lead to heart failure in patients with myocarditis. (2019-01-28)

Bad brakes
A study in human and mouse heart cells identifies a faulty molecular brake in the most common form of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young people and athletes and the most common genetic disease of the heart The faulty brake, found about a quarter of all genetic mutations in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, interferes with the heart muscle's ability to contract and relax,. Treatment with a chemical compound successfully restores normal contractility and relaxation in human heart cells (2019-01-28)

Study uncovers why heart attack triggers arrhythmia in some, explores potential treatment
A team of researchers led by the University of California San Diego has identified a genetic pathway that causes some individuals to develop an abnormal heart rhythm, or arrhythmia, after experiencing a heart attack. They have also identified a drug candidate that can block this pathway. (2019-01-28)

Muscle memory discovery ends 'use it or lose it' dogma
Exercise physiologists agree: muscle memory is real. But how are these 'memories' stored? A review published in Frontiers in Physiology has a simple answer: nuclei gained during training persist even when muscle cells shrink due to disuse or start to break down. This means we can 'bank' nuclei in our youth to prevent frailty in old age -- and makes steroid use in competitive sport a perfect but irredeemable crime. (2019-01-25)

ESC press release: Loss of muscle and weight associated with disability after stroke
Loss of muscle and body weight is associated with disability after stroke, reports a study presented today at Heart & Stroke 2019, a meeting of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Stroke, and published in the Journal of Cachexia, Sarcopenia and Muscle. (2019-01-25)

'Training gym' for lab-grown heart cells: Engineering researchers design new platform
Heart muscle cells need exercise -- even when they grow outside the human body. A new device designed by University of Toronto Engineering researchers uses a rigorous training regimen to grow small amounts of cardiac tissue and measure how strongly it beats. The platform is ideal for testing the effects of potential drug molecules, and could help bring personalized medicine closer to reality. (2019-01-24)

A muscle protein promotes nerve healing
Damaged fibres in the brain or spinal cord usually don't heal at all. Neuroscientists from Bochum have high hopes for new methods based on gene therapy. (2019-01-23)

Fried food linked to heightened risk of death among older US women
Regularly eating fried food is linked with a heightened risk of death from any cause and heart-related death, among postmenopausal women, finds a US study in The BMJ today. (2019-01-23)

Exercise before surgery can protect both muscle and nerves, study suggests
Exercise can protect both muscle and nerves from damage caused by the restoration of blood flow after injury or surgery, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine shows. (2019-01-22)

Frequent use of aspirin can lead to increased bleeding
A new study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) has found that taking aspirin on a regular basis to prevent heart attacks and strokes, can lead to an increase risk of almost 50 percent in major bleeding episodes. (2019-01-22)

Infectious disease researchers unveil the secret life of flesh-eating bacteria
Using a tool first used for strep throat in horses, Houston Methodist researchers unveiled the secret life of flesh-eating bacteria, learning how it causes severe disease while living deep within muscle. The team focused on necrotizing myositis. The study appears Jan. 22 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. Corresponding author James M. Musser says his team now has an in-depth understanding of the precise genes group A streptococcus uses to cause this deadly infection. (2019-01-22)

Feeling groovy: Neurons integrate better with muscle grown on grooved platforms
Growing muscle tissue on grooved platforms helps neurons more effectively integrate with the muscle, a requirement for engineering muscle in the lab that responds and functions like muscle in the body, University of Illinois researchers found in a new study. Such engineered muscle with integrated nerves has applications in reconstructive and rehabilitative medicine, as well as for engineered biological machines or robots. (2019-01-22)

Timely referral to kidney transplant may improve survival for patients with lupus nephritis
Patients with lupus nephritis and end stage renal disease may benefit from timely kidney transplant, as transplantation was associated with a significant increase in survival in a nationwide cohort study. The main reason for the overall survival benefit was fewer deaths due to cardiovascular disease and infections. The findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2019-01-21)

Erucic acid
Erucic acid occurs in vegetable oils and fats. It is a natural component of plant seeds of the Brassicaceae family (crucifers such as rape and mustard). Chemically, it is a long-chain, simple, unsaturated omega-9 fatty acid. (2019-01-17)

Poor sleep and heart-related death
Elderly men who experience extended episodes of interrupted breathing while asleep have a high risk of heart problems. Research shows for the first time that poor blood oxygenation is a good indicator of the chance of heart-related death, which cannot be attributed to sleep apnoea alone. (2019-01-17)

Ketone body utilization decreases when blood flow to the heart is reduced
Researchers from Kumamoto University in Japan measured the ketone body utilization rate in the heart and confirmed that it decreases when the heart is in a state of reduced blood flow (myocardial ischemia). (2019-01-16)

Gastric bypass surgery may benefit muscle strength more than previously thought
Gastric bypass surgery improves relative muscle strength and physical performance in people with obesity, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2019-01-16)

Immune cell clues offer hope to hypertension patients, study suggests
Scientists have pinpointed cells in the immune system that could be key to tackling high blood pressure. The findings also shed light on current medications that could increase risk of the disorder, which affects more than 12 million people in the UK. (2019-01-16)

Staying fit can cut your risk of heart attack by half
Raise your pulse, break a sweat and do it several times a week. Then you'll reduce your statistical risk of running into serious heart problems later, new research confirms. (2019-01-15)

Muscle stem cells can drive cancer that arises in Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Scientists from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have demonstrated that muscle stem cells may give rise to rhabdomyosarcoma that occurs during DMD--and identified two genes linked to the tumor's growth. The research, performed using a mouse model of severe DMD, helps scientists better understand how rhabdomyosarcoma develops in DMD--and indicates that ongoing efforts to develop treatments that stimulate muscle stem cells should consider potential cancer risk. The study was published in Cell Reports on January 15, 2019. (2019-01-15)

Genetic risk for atypical heart attack in women identified
New research published by teams from Leicester, UK and Paris, France in collaboration with international partners from the US and Australia, has found a common genetic factor that confers a significant risk of atypical heart attacks in women. (2019-01-14)

Childhood body composition may help determine future lung health
Boys and girls with more muscle mass in childhood and adolescence have higher lung function. (2019-01-11)

Researchers discover a hidden culprit in heart failure
An international research team led by scientists at the University of Alberta have pinpointed a hidden culprit that leads to dilated cardiomyopathy--a dangerous condition that accounts for 20 per cent of all cases of heart failure--which opens the door to potential new treatments that could help counter the threat. (2019-01-10)

UMN Medical School Researchers discover how to treat diastolic heart failure
Research out of University Minnesota Medical School and published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight uncovers what causes diastolic heart failure and how it can be treated. (2019-01-10)

The FASEB Journal: Fish oil supplementation can slow muscle loss during immobilization
A study published in The FASEB Journal demonstrated that dietary supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids (or fish oils) reduced the rate at which young women lost muscle mass during a period of immobilization. (2019-01-10)

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