Current Heart Rhythm News and Events

Current Heart Rhythm News and Events, Heart Rhythm News Articles.
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Fat cells may influence how the body reacts to heart failure, study shows
University of Alberta researchers have found that limiting the amount of fat the body releases into the bloodstream from fat cells when in heart failure could help improve outcomes for patients. (2021-02-23)

Real world data on hospital readmissions of patients with heart failure
In an analysis of information on 448 patients with heart failure who were discharged from a hospital in Sweden, 20.3% of patients were readmitted to the hospital within 30 days, and 60.9% were readmitted within 1 year. The ESC Heart Failure analysis found that most of the patients who needed to be rehospitalized were readmitted for heart failure. (2021-02-18)

How location dictates biological clocks of species: Study in beetles offers new insights
Biological clocks are ubiquitous in living organisms and govern their behavioral pattern, from sleep-wake cycle to reproduction. Although they are well-understood, how they differ based on geographic location is unclear. In a new study, scientists from Japan report variations in the biological clocks of red flour beetles across the country, offering new insights into how they work. (2021-02-18)

Stents or bypass surgery more effective for stable patients with high-risk cardiac anatomy
A study by University of Alberta cardiologists at the Canadian VIGOUR Centre shows that a particular group of patients with stable ischemic heart disease have better outcomes with percutaneous coronary intervention (also called angioplasty with stent) or coronary artery bypass surgery and medication, versus conservative management with medication alone. (2021-02-18)

FSU College of Medicine researcher develops new possibilities to prevent sudden cardiac death
Stephen Chelko, an assistant professor of biomedical sciences at the Florida State University College of Medicine, has developed a better understanding of the pathological characteristics behind arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, as well as promising avenues for prevention. (2021-02-17)

Differences in walking patterns could predict type of cognitive decline in older adults
Canadian researchers are the first to study how different patterns in the way older adults walk could more accurately diagnose different types of dementia and identify Alzheimer's disease. (2021-02-16)

Understanding heart disease, stroke in women remains a scientific research priority
The February 2021 issue of Circulation, published online today, features new clinical trial research, state of the art reviews and scientific perspectives exploring the unique challenges women face in their fight against heart disease and stroke. The journal received more than 100 manuscripts for consideration this year, the most ever in the five years the current editorial board has published a special Go Red for Women issue. (2021-02-16)

Drinking, smoking, and drug use linked to premature heart disease in the young
Recreational drinking, smoking, and drug use is linked to premature heart disease in young people, particularly younger women, finds research published online in the journal Heart. (2021-02-15)

Heartbeat secrets unlocked as cardiac rhythm gene role identified
Researchers have used the zebrafish (Danio rerio) to identify the role of a gene involved in cardiac rhythm, which could help explain the fundamentals of what it takes to make a human heartbeat. (2021-02-15)

Heart disease deaths rising in young women
A nationwide US study has found increasing death rates from heart disease in women under 65. The research is published in European Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1 The study found that while death rates from cancer declined every year between 1999 and 2018, after an initial drop, heart disease death rates have been rising since 2010. (2021-02-10)

Long-term stress linked to increased risk of heart attack
Can long-term stress lead to heart attacks? Most people would probably answer in the affirmative, but the scientific evidence of this is scarce. A new study by researchers from Linköping University in Sweden reveals that the levels of the stress hormone cortisol were increased in the months preceding a heart attack. The results, published in Scientific Reports, suggest that long-term stress is a risk factor for heart attacks. (2021-02-10)

Texas A&M researchers discover energy drinks' harmful effects on heart
A team of researchers, led by a Texas A&M University professor, has found that some energy drinks have adverse effects on the muscle cells of the heart. (2021-02-10)

Texas Heart Institute develops breakthrough heart ablation evaluation system
The Texas Heart Institute (THI) has announced that a research team led by Dr. Mehdi Razavi, Director of Electrophysiology Clinical Research & Innovations, has developed a breakthrough new ex vivo benchtop system for evaluating the effects of ablation systems on excised tissues and assessing potential damage to collateral heart tissues. The unique system allows for fast and easy benchtop assessments rather than using costly in vivo tests. Critical findings associated with this innovation are outlined in a study published in the Journal of Cardiovascular Physiology. (2021-02-09)

Synchronization of brain hemispheres changes what we hear
Most of the time, our brain receives different input from each of our ears, but we nevertheless perceive speech as unified sounds. This process takes place through synchronization of the areas of the brain involved with the help of gamma waves, neurolinguists at the University of Zurich have now discovered. Their findings may lead to new treatment approaches for tinnitus. (2021-02-08)

Signs of burnout can be detected in sweat
EPFL engineers, working in association with startup Xsensio, have developed a wearable system that can continually measure the concentration of cortisol - the stress hormone - in human sweat. Their device can eventually help doctors better understand and treat stress-related conditions like burnout and obesity. (2021-02-05)

Audiovisual professionalisation affects how the brain perceives media content
According to a study conducted by the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, the Instituto Radio Televisión Española and the Universidad Pablo de Olavide in Seville, audiovisual professionals decrease their eyeblink rate after cuts, suggesting that they can better manage the loss of visual information that blinking entails. (2021-02-05)

Link found between time perception, risk for developmental coordination disorder
Neuroscientists at McMaster University have found a link between children who are at risk for developmental coordination disorder (DCD), a common condition that can cause clumsiness, and difficulties with time perception such as interpreting changes in rhythmic beats. (2021-02-05)

Drinking green tea, coffee lowers risk of death for stroke and heart attack survivors
Stroke survivors who drank seven or more cups of green tea each day lowered their risks of multiple causes of death by 62%. Drinking one cup of coffee each day lowered the risks of death for heart attack survivors and for those without a history of stroke or heart attack. (2021-02-04)

Exercise caution after working out in virtual reality
Virtual 'exergaming' has become a popular way to exercise - especially among younger people - since the release of virtual reality (VR) fitness games on consoles such as Nintendo and Playstation. But while VR is undoubtedly raising fitness games to a whole new level, researchers at the University of South Australia are cautioning players about the potential side effects of VR, particularly in the first hour after playing. (2021-02-04)

Uncovering a link between inflammation and heart disease
Patients with cardiac disease often have chronic inflammation that damages their hearts, even with no infection present. A new study published in Circulation reveals a mechanism that is activating T cells, a type of immune cell, and causing inflammation in the heart. (2021-02-04)

Life changes influence physical activity
Life changes influence the amount of physical activity in a person, according to a recent study by the University of Jyväskylä. The birth of children and a change of residence, marital status and place of work all influence the number of steps of men and women in different ways. (2021-02-03)

Women at higher-risk of fatal, nightime cardiac arrest
A new Cedars-Sinai study shows that during nighttime hours, women are more likely than men to suffer sudden death due to cardiac arrest. The findings were published in the journal Heart Rhythm. (2021-02-03)

Iron release may contribute to cell death in heart failure
A process that releases iron in response to stress may contribute to heart failure, and blocking this process could be a way of protecting the heart, suggests a study in mice published today in eLife. (2021-02-02)

Mayo Clinic research yields breakthrough in mobile determination of QT prolongation
Researchers from Mayo Clinic and AliveCor Inc. have been using artificial intelligence (AI) to develop a mobile device that can identify certain patients at risk of sudden cardiac death. (2021-02-01)

Researchers map heart recovery after heart attack with great detail
Researchers from the Hubrecht Institute mapped the recovery of the heart after a heart attack with great detail. They found that cardiomyocytes play an important role in the intracellular communication after a heart attack. The researchers documented their findings in a database that is accessible for scientists around the world. This brings the research field a step closer to the development of therapies for improved recovery after heart injury. (2021-01-29)

Genes that dance to the circadian rhythm
Scientists at EPFL have made breakthrough discoveries on the circadian clock and how it affects gene expression. Some of the findings suggest a biological underpinning for different behaviors in people, such as morning people, nappers, evening people, night owls etc. (2021-01-29)

First hybrid gene therapy shows early promise in treating long QT syndrome
In a new study published in Circulation, Mayo Clinic researchers provide the first preclinical, proof-of-concept study for hybrid gene therapy in long QT syndrome, a potentially lethal heart rhythm condition. (2021-01-28)

Breakthrough design at UBCO vastly improves mechanical heart valve
New research coming out of UBC's Okanagan campus may take the current 'gold standard' for heart valves to a new level of reliability. A team of researchers at UBCO's Heart Valve Performance Lab (HVPL) has developed a way to improve overall blood flow through the valves, so the design of mechanical heart valves will more closely match the real thing. (2021-01-26)

'Brain training' may be an effective treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder
Neurofeedback, also called 'brain training,' consists of exercises where individuals regulate their own brain activity. In a new study, researchers have found that neurofeedback may be an effective treatment for individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder. (2021-01-26)

Mental health is important to overall health, and heart disease prevention and treatment
Depression and negative psychological health conditions are associated with a less healthy heart and body, while optimism and other positive mental health states are associated with a healthier heart and body. Health care professionals should consider patients' psychological health when evaluating or treating people with or at risk for heart disease. (2021-01-25)

Light pollution linked to preterm birth increase
Scientists conducted the first study to examine the fetal health impact of light pollution based on a direct measure of skyglow, an important aspect of light pollution. Using an empirical regularity discovered in physics, called Walker's Law, a team from Lehigh University, Lafayette College and the University of Colorado Denver in the U.S., found evidence of reduced birth weight, shortened gestational length and preterm births. (2021-01-25)

A world first in circadian clock manipulation
A new method developed by Nagoya University and Groningen University scientists allows for reversible manipulation of the circadian clock period using a light-activated switch. Compounds which act on clock proteins were identified through large-scale chemical screening, and modified to include a light-activated switch, which was further modified to react to non-harmful visible light, creating a non-toxic and fully reversible circadian clock control process. (2021-01-24)

Predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1266, Zhuzhi Wen, Jingying Hou, Zun Mai, Huifen Huang, Yangxin Chen, Dengfeng Geng and Jingfeng Wang from Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China and Guandong Province Key Laboratory of Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, Guangzhou, China consider predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope. (2021-01-22)

Counting patients social determinants of health may help doctors avert fatal heart attacks
Doctors may be able to predict their patients' risks of fatal coronary heart disease more accurately by taking into account the number of adverse social factors affecting them, according to a new study led by researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian. (2021-01-21)

Mayo Clinic study indicates age influences sex-related outcomes after heart attack
Approximately 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes occur every year in men and women in the US Sex and age play a large part in who experiences a heart attack, the methods used to treat these heart attacks, and the eventual post hospital outcomes of the people who experience heart attacks. Mayo Clinic researchers discuss these sex and age differences in study findings published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2021-01-20)

Where COVID-19 hit hardest, sudden deaths outside the hospital increased
A new study comparing the incidence of sudden deaths occurring outside the hospital across New York City's highly diverse neighborhoods with the percentage of positive SARS-CoV-19 tests found that increased sudden deaths during the pandemic correlate to the extent of virus infection in a neighborhood. The analysis appears in Heart Rhythm, the official journal of the Heart Rhythm Society, the Cardiac Electrophysiology Society, and the Pediatric & Congenital Electrophysiology Society, published by Elsevier. (2021-01-18)

Fried food intake linked to heightened serious heart disease and stroke risk
Fried-food intake is linked to a heightened risk of major heart disease and stroke, finds a pooled analysis of the available research data, published online in the journal Heart. (2021-01-18)

New research reveals early warning sign for heart disease
The build-up of calcium in a major artery outside of the heart could predict future heart attack or stroke, a new Edith Cowan University led study has demonstrated. (2021-01-13)

Tracking the formation of the early heart, cell by cell
Richard Tyser and colleagues have mapped the origins of the embryonic mouse heart at single-cell resolution, helping to define the cell types that make up the heart in the earliest days of development. (2021-01-07)

COVID-19 infection linked with higher death rate in acute heart failure patients
Patients with acute heart failure nearly double their risk of dying if they get COVID-19, according to research published today in ESC Heart Failure, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1 The small, single centre study highlights the need for patients with heart failure to take extra precautions to avoid catching COVID-19. ''Our results support prioritising heart failure patients for COVID-19 vaccination once it is available,'' said study lead investigator Dr. Amardeep Dastidar. (2021-01-06)

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