Current Heart Transplant News and Events | Page 25

Current Heart Transplant News and Events, Heart Transplant News Articles.
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Alternatives to whole liver transplants for children have become safer, study finds
In a new Johns Hopkins study of patient and graft survival trends for pediatric liver transplant recipients between 2002 and 2015, researchers found that outcomes for alternatives to whole liver transplantation (WLT), such as splitting a liver for two recipients or using a part of a liver from a living donor, have improved significantly. (2018-02-12)

A new tool for improving uterine transplant surgery
Future Science Group (FSG) today announced the publication of an article in Future Science OA demonstrating the first use of multispectral imaging in gynecology, in a uterine transplant setting. (2018-02-12)

Obesity, other risks play large role in sudden cardiac arrest among the young
Obesity and other common cardiovascular risk factors may play a greater role in sudden cardiac arrest among younger people than previously recognized, underscoring the importance of earlier screening, a Cedars-Sinai study has found. (2018-02-12)

Search for genetically stable bioengineered gut and liver tissue takes step forward
Before medical science can bioengineer human organs in a lab for therapeutic use, two remaining hurdles are ensuring genetic stability -- so the organs are free from the risk of tumor growth -- and producing organ tissues of sufficient volume and size for viable transplant into people. Scientists report in Stem Cell Reports achieving both goals with a new production method for bioengineered human gut and liver tissues. (2018-02-08)

CNIC scientists describe the mechanism of heart regeneration in the zebrafish
A new study published in Nature Communications describes a high level of plasticity among different cell populations in the regenerating zebrafish heart (2018-02-08)

Detecting and treating dnDSA early preserves allograft function
Monitoring and treating de novo donor-specific antibodies before they could cause graft damage helped to decrease dnDSA in a majority of pediatric kidney transplant recipients at Children National Health System and prevented graft failure in the first few years. (2018-02-05)

Moffitt researchers identify new target to reduce risk of GVHD
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are trying to identify new drug targets to reduce the risk of GVHD. Their new study, published last week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows a drug that targets the protein JAK2 may reduce the risk of GVHD. (2018-02-05)

Trains, planes, automobiles and heart disease
Noise may disrupt the body on the cellular level in a way that increases the risk of common heart disease risk factors, according to a review topic published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology that examined the underlying mechanisms that may lead to noise-induced heart disease. The review is in response to growing evidence connecting environmental noise, including from road traffic and aircrafts, to the development of heart disease, such as coronary artery disease, arterial hypertension, stroke and heart failure. (2018-02-05)

Following treatment guidelines more important than volume for assessing heart failure care
Looking at how well hospitals adhere to treatment guidelines for heart failure is more important than comparing patient volumes at hospitals, new research shows. (2018-02-05)

Geese reduce metabolic rate to cope with winter
New research shows that geese cope with the harsh winter climate by reducing their heart rate and body temperature. (2018-02-01)

New focus on where heart disease and breast cancer treatment meet
The American Heart Association has released the first scientific statement about heart disease and breast cancer, calling for more research and collaboration between the fields of oncology and cardiology to treat and prevent both diseases. (2018-02-01)

Red wine proves good for the heart (again)
Antioxidant compounds found in red wine are advancing the treatment of heart disease -- the leading cause of death for both men and women in the US Researchers have developed drug-eluting stents with red wine antioxidants. (2018-02-01)

Short section of DNA predicts kidney transplant success
The first study of its kind to gather transplant data from across the UK and Ireland found patients have the best chance of long term survival where the donor and recipient have genetic matches in a section of DNA known as the HLA locus. This finding could help to personalise treatment and reduce costs to the NHS as patients need less treatment or spend less time in hospital. (2018-02-01)

Discovery of molecular nets inside heart muscles hold promise for new treatment
Local researchers have discovered that a group of molecules, called chondroitin sulfate, normally found only in connective tissues such as the cartilage, accumulates and causes inflammation in the hearts of patients with heart failure. The discovery was made jointly by the National University Health System (NUHS), A*STAR's Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) and the National University of Singapore (NUS) Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, and is now published in Circulation, a journal from the American Heart Association. (2018-01-31)

Teens need vigorous physical activity and fitness to cut heart risk
Guidelines for teenagers should stress the importance of vigorous physical activity and fitness to cut the risk of heart disease, new research suggests. (2018-01-31)

Biomarker tests could someday help improve outcomes for organ transplant patients
Organ transplants save lives, but the story doesn't end when a patient emerges from the operating room. Rejection episodes, in which the immune system rallies against the new organ, can occur. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, researchers are turning to biomarkers to help them get a better idea of which patients are more likely to have an episode. (2018-01-31)

Landmark international study: CAR T-cell therapy safe and effective in youth with leukemia
Results of the global, multicenter, pivotal phase 2 study that led to the first FDA approval of a gene therapy/cell therapy approach known as CAR T-cell therapy, were published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. Senior authors on the study include Stephen A. Grupp, of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Michael A. Pulsipher, M.D., of Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA). (2018-01-31)

Migraine linked to increased risk of cardiovascular problems
Migraine is associated with increased risks of cardiovascular problems (conditions affecting the heart and blood vessels) including heart attacks, stroke, blood clots and an irregular heart rate, say researchers in a study published by The BMJ today. (2018-01-31)

Guideline adherence, not patient volume, may be better hospital heart failure metric
In evaluating the quality of inpatient heart failure care, patients and policy makers should consider how well a hospital meets clinical care guidelines. Hospitals that treat more heart failure patients tend to follow heart failure guidelines more closely. However, death and hospital readmission rates can be just as good at hospitals with small numbers of heart failure patients whose treatment adheres to guideline recommendations. (2018-01-29)

Latest issue of Structural Heart: The Journal of the Heart Team is now available
The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is pleased to announce that the latest issue of Structural Heart: The Journal of the Heart Team is now available online. (2018-01-29)

Researchers overcome obstacle for future stem cell therapies
Researchers have discovered a new technique that overcomes one of the major challenges of stem cell therapy. A drug, co-created by UBC researchers, might overcome one of the major challenges of stem cell therapy -- their tendency to differentiate, becoming specific tissue cells too early and too quickly. (2018-01-25)

Heart cells sense stiffness by measuring contraction forces and resting tension simultaneously
Researchers from Queen Mary University of London have identified a new mechanism in which adhesive structures within the cells of the heart sense stiffness through muscle contractions and resting tension at the same time. (2018-01-25)

Method assesses how well dialysis clinics refer patients for transplantation
A new method is useful for assessing how well individual dialysis facilities are referring patients for kidney transplantation. When the method was applied to dialysis facilities in Georgia, researchers found that most of the variation in referrals for transplantation were due to characteristics within the dialysis facilities rather than patient characteristics. (2018-01-25)

Adipose tissue depots compromise heart health
Researchers from the Institute of Pharmacology of the Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have shown that the release of fatty acids from body fat has a major impact on heart health. By interfering with the body's lipid metabolism, the researchers successfully reduced the risk of heart failure. The results of this study have been published in the journal PLOS Genetics*. (2018-01-24)

Just one cigarette a day carries greater risk of heart disease and stroke than expected, warn expert
Smoking just one cigarette a day has a much higher risk of developing coronary heart disease and stroke than expected -- about half the risk of smoking 20 per day -- concludes a review of the evidence published by The BMJ today. (2018-01-24)

Study shows how fetal infections may cause adult heart disease
Infants born prematurely are known to have a higher risk of developing heart disease later in life. Now, a study led by researchers at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle shows that, in preterm animal models, inflammation due to infection can disrupt the activity of genes that are crucial for normal development of the heart. The findings point to the importance of developing better ways to prevent or therapeutically target inflammation in the fetus to reduce long-term health problems. (2018-01-23)

Racial and ethnic disparities in live donor kidney transplants
Despite efforts over the past two decades to increase the number of black and Hispanic patients receiving kidney transplants from related or unrelated living donors, these racial/ethnic minority patients are still much less likely to undergo such transplants than white patients, Johns Hopkins researchers report. In fact, the investigators say, the disparities have worsened in the last 20 years. (2018-01-23)

Parent misconceptions may hinder child organ donation
Parents' major concerns about child organ donation often included misunderstandings about medical care, potential suffering and cost. (2018-01-23)

New blood test for diagnosing heart attacks: A 'big deal,' with caveats
A longtime blood test that measures the likelihood of a cardiac event has become more sensitive and more precise. Why doctors and patients should be cautiously optimistic. (2018-01-15)

Scleroderma study: Hope for a longer life for patients with rare autoimmune disorder
The approach could represent the first new treatment to improve survival in patients with severe scleroderma in more than four decades. (2018-01-12)

Heart-muscle patches made with human cells improve heart attack recovery
Large, human cardiac-muscle patches created in the lab have been tested, for the first time, on large animals in a heart attack model. This clinically relevant approach showed that the patches significantly improved recovery from heart attack injury. The results are a step closer to the goal of treating human heart attacks by suturing cardiac-muscle patches over an area of dead heart muscle in order to reduce the pathology that often leads to heart failure. (2018-01-10)

Place of residence linked to heart failure risk
According to new research in the American Heart Association journal, Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, almost 5 percent of heart failure risk was connected to neighborhood factors. (2018-01-09)

Pioneering new technique could boost understanding of causes of heart disease
The complex and mysterious mechanisms that drive communication and reactions within human cells could be on the verge of being unravelled, due to a pioneering new technique. (2018-01-09)

Excess fat disrupts heart cell's energy system
A University of Iowa study finds that lipid overload in heart cells, a common feature in diabetes and obesity, leads to misshapen mitochondria that don't produce energy efficiently. This structural disruption may contribute to the two- to five-fold increased risk of heart failure in people with diabetes. (2018-01-05)

Cellular barcoding helps scientists understand the behavior of stem cells
By tagging bone marrow cells of mice with a genetic label, or barcode, researchers were able to track and describe the family tree of individual blood cells as they form in their natural environment. (2018-01-03)

Study shows stem cell transplant is better than drug therapy for scleroderma
Scleroderma with internal organ involvement is a debilitating and lethal autoimmune disorder with few effective treatments. But a study led by Duke Health researchers has found new cause for optimism using an aggressive stem cell transplant regimen. (2018-01-03)

Stem cell transplant for severe scleroderma improves survival, quality of life
Clinical trial findings show that a regimen involving transplantation of a person's own blood-forming stem cells can improve survival for people with severe scleroderma, a life-threatening autoimmune disease. Myeloablative autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) includes chemotherapy and radiation to destroy the bone marrow then transplanting the person's own blood-forming stem cells to reconstitute the marrow and immune system. The NIH-funded study found myeloablative HSCT to be superior to treatment with the immune-suppressing drug cyclophosphamide. (2018-01-03)

Racial, ethnic disparities persist for patients in receiving kidney transplants from live donors
Black and Hispanic patients are less likely than white patients to receive a live donor kidney after two years on a waiting list, with an increase in disparity over the last two decades. (2018-01-02)

Educational video may increase public willingness to become face transplant donors
After watching a brief educational video, members of the public are more likely to say they would be willing to donate a facial transplant to a severely disfigured patient, reports a study in the January issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). (2018-01-02)

Researchers shed light on why exercise slows progression of Parkinson's disease
While vigorous exercise on a treadmill has been shown to slow the progression of Parkinson's disease in patients, the molecular reasons behind it have remained a mystery. (2017-12-22)

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