Current Heat Waves News and Events

Current Heat Waves News and Events, Heat Waves News Articles.
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Spintronics: New production method makes crystalline microstructures universally usable
New storage and information technology requires new higher performance materials. One of these materials is yttrium iron garnet, which has special magnetic properties. Thanks to a new process, it can now be transferred to any material. Developed by physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the method could advance the production of smaller, faster and more energy-efficient components for data storage and information processing. The physicists have published their results in the journal ''Applied Physics Letters''. (2021-02-23)

A salt solution for desalinating brine
Solar-powered brine crystallization could alleviate the environmental impacts of seawater desalination. (2021-02-21)

Increasing temperatures will hit meat and milk production in East Africa
Heat stress will detrimentally impact future livestock production in East Africa without urgent adaptation measures. (2021-02-18)

Poor swelter as urban areas of U.S. Southwest get hotter
As climate change accelerates, low-income districts in the Southwestern United States are 4 to 7 degrees hotter in Fahrenheit -- on average -- than wealthy neighborhoods in the same metro regions. (2021-02-18)

New method converts methane in natural gas to methanol at room temperature
Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have discovered a way to convert the methane in natural gas into liquid methanol at room temperature. (2021-02-18)

Exaggerated radar data above the freezing level induced by terrain
Scientists find exaggerated radar data above the freezing level are induced by terrain. (2021-02-17)

People with this muscle protein gene variant tolerate the cold better
A gene variant that affects muscle function may have protected humans against cold during migrations from Africa to Europe more than 50,000 years ago, suggests a study appearing February 17 in the American Journal of Human Genetics. Researchers show that deficiency of a protein called α-actinin-3 caused by a gene variant improves cold tolerance in humans by increasing muscle tone. (2021-02-17)

RUDN University physicists analyzed the role of gravity in elementary particles formation
Gravity might play a bigger role in the formation of elementary particles than scientists used to believe. A team of physicists from RUDN University obtained some solutions of semi-classical models that describe particle-like waves. They also calculated the ratio between the gravitational interaction of particles and the interaction of their charges. (2021-02-17)

Story tips: Modeling COVID, permafrost lost and taking the heat
ORNL story tips: Modeling COVID, permafrost lost and taking the heat. (2021-02-16)

Finding coronavirus's helper proteins
A group of scientists led by EMBL's Mikhail Savitski, Nassos Typas, and Pedro Beltrao, and collaborator Steeve Boulant at Heidelberg University Hospital, have analysed how the novel coronavirus affects proteins in human cells. They identified several human proteins as potential drug targets to prevent viral replication. (2021-02-16)

NREL heats up thermal energy storage with new solution meant to ease grid stress
Scientists from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed a simple way to better evaluate the potential of novel materials to store or release heat on demand in your home, office, or other building in a way that more efficiently manages the building's energy use. (2021-02-16)

Changing the connection between the hemispheres affects speech perception
When we listen to speech sounds, our brain needs to combine information from both hemispheres. How does the brain integrate acoustic information from remote areas? In a neuroimaging study, a team of researchers led by the Max Planck Institute of Psycholinguistics, the Donders Institute and the University of Zurich applied electrical stimulation to participants' brains during a listening task. The stimulation affected the connection between the two hemispheres, which in turn changed participants' listening behaviour. (2021-02-12)

Increasing hurricane intensity around Bermuda linked to rising ocean temperatures
New research shows that hurricane maximum wind speeds in the subtropical Atlantic around Bermuda have more than doubled on average over the last 60 years due to rising ocean temperatures in the region. (2021-02-12)

New insight into protein structures that could treat Huntington's disease
In Huntington's disease, a faulty protein aggregates in brain cells and eventually kills them. Such protein aggregates could, in principle, be prevented with a heat shock protein. However, it is not well known how these proteins interact with the Huntington's disease protein. New research by Patrick van der Wel (University of Groningen) and colleagues at the University of Texas has partially resolved the structure of heat shock proteins that bind to such aggregating proteins. (2021-02-12)

Study: Facing heat illness, dehydration risks, marching bands need access to athletic trainers
A KU study measured marching band members' core temperatures, fluid intake and behaviors through high-tech methods to determine their risks of heat illness. Findings showed band members are just as at risk as athletes, yet seldom have access to health experts or policies to protect them. (2021-02-11)

Seismic surveys using fin whale songs
Fin whale song - one of the strongest animal calls in the ocean - can be used as a seismic source for probing the structure of Earth's crust at the seafloor, researchers report. (2021-02-11)

Low carbon transport at sea: Ferries voyage optimization in the Adriatic
What CO2 savings are potentially attainable through path optimization? How much can ferries' carbon intensity be decreased? What is the role of waves and currents? A new study led by the CMCC Foundation shows how the future least-CO2 ferry routes could look like. (2021-02-09)

An interdecadal decrease in extreme heat days in August over Northeast China around the early 1990s
An interdecadal decrease in extreme heat days in August over Northeast China around the early 1990s. (2021-02-08)

Efficiency limits of next-generation hybrid photovoltaic-thermal solar technology
Spectral-splitting hybrid photovoltaic-thermal (SSPVT) technology has emerged as a promising route toward high-performance solar harvesting. In this research, scientists have developed a comprehensive framework for modelling SSPVT solar collectors. The framework can be used to determine the efficiency limits of such collectors and to indicate how these limits can be approached through the selection of optimal designs and materials. This work promotes and provides guidance to the design, development and deployment of next-generation solar systems. (2021-02-08)

'Multiplying' light could be key to ultra-powerful optical computers
New type of optical computing could solve highly complex problems that are out of reach for even the most powerful supercomputers. (2021-02-08)

Radiative cooling and solar heating from one system, no electricity needed
A University at Buffalo-led study published Feb. 8 in the journal Cell Reports Physical Science describes a new technology that provides both radiative cooling and solar heating, all is one system and without using electricity or fuel. It could help impoverished communities, reduce cooling and heating costs, lower CO2 emissions (2021-02-08)

Synchronization of brain hemispheres changes what we hear
Most of the time, our brain receives different input from each of our ears, but we nevertheless perceive speech as unified sounds. This process takes place through synchronization of the areas of the brain involved with the help of gamma waves, neurolinguists at the University of Zurich have now discovered. Their findings may lead to new treatment approaches for tinnitus. (2021-02-08)

Ural Federal University scientists developed a new way of synthesis of high-purity zircon
A research group from Ural Federal University synthesized high-purity single-phase zircon (ZrSiO4) and analyzed its structural, thermal, vibrational and optical properties. The results have been published in the Journal of Solid State Chemistry (Q2) (2021-02-05)

NANOGrav finds possible 'first hints' of low-frequency gravitational wave background
In data gathered and analyzed over 13 years, the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) Physics Frontiers Center (PFC) has found an intriguing low-frequency signal that may be attributable to gravitational waves. (2021-02-04)

From waste heat to electrical power: A new generation of thermomagnetic generators
Use of waste heat contributes largely to sustainable energy supply. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and T?hoku University in Japan have now come much closer to their goal of converting waste heat into electrical power at small temperature differences. As reported in Joule, electrical power per footprint of thermomagnetic generators based on Heusler alloy films has been increased by a factor of 3.4. (DOI: 10.1016/j.joule.2020.10.019) (2021-02-03)

RUDN University mathematicians developed new approach to 5g base stations operation
Mathematicians from RUDN University suggested and tested a new method to assess the productivity of fifth-generation (5G) base stations. The new technology would help get rid of mobile access stations and even out traffic fluctuations. (2021-02-03)

Ultrasound technique treats prostate cancer with minimal side effects
A technique that delivers high-intensity focused ultrasound to targeted tissue under MRI guidance effectively treats intermediate-risk prostate cancer with minimal side effects, according to a new study. (2021-02-02)

How do electrons close to Earth reach almost the speed of light?
In the Van Allen radiation belts, electrons can reach almost speed of light. Hayley Allison and Yuri Shprits, German Research Centre for Geosciences, have revealed conditions for such strong accelerations. They had demonstrated in 2020: during solar storm plasma waves play a crucial role. However, it remained unclear why ultra-relativistic electron energies are not achieved in all solar storms. In Science Advances they now show: extreme depletions of the background plasma density are crucial. (2021-02-02)

Salt battery design overcomes bump in the road to help electric cars go the extra mile
Using salt as a key ingredient, Chinese and British researchers have designed a new type of rechargeable battery that could accelerate the shift to greener, electric transport on our roads. (2021-02-01)

Backreaction observed for first time in water tank black hole simulation
Scientists have revealed new insights into the behaviour of black holes with research that demonstrates how a phenomenon called backreaction can be simulated. (2021-02-01)

Socioeconomic, demographic and urban factors influence the spread of COVID-19
Per capita income, population volume and density, the structure of cities, transport infrastructure or whether districts have their own schools are all factors that can affect the spread of COVID-19. This has been confirmed by a study carried out in 73 districts in Barcelona (Spain) by researchers from the Universitat Rovira i Virgili, the results of which have been published in the Journal of Public Health. (2021-01-31)

Marine heatwaves becoming more intense, more frequent
When thick, the surface layer of the ocean acts as a buffer to extreme marine heating--but a new study from the University of Colorado Boulder shows this ''mixed layer'' is becoming shallower each year. The thinner it becomes, the easier it is to warm. The new work could explain recent extreme marine heatwaves, and point at a future of more frequent and destructive ocean warming events as global temperatures continue to climb. (2021-01-28)

Ancient indigenous New Mexican community knew how to sustainably coexist with wildfire
Wildfires are the enemy when they threaten homes in California and elsewhere. But a new study led by SMU suggests that people living in fire-prone places can learn to manage fire as an ally to prevent dangerous blazes, just like people who lived nearly 1,000 years ago. (2021-01-27)

Reef fish futures foretold
There are markedly different outcomes for different species of coral reef fishes under climate change - scientists are now another step closer to uncovering the 'winners and losers'. (2021-01-26)

Optimal information about the invisible
Laser beams can be used to precisely measure an object's position or velocity. Normally, a clear, unobstructed view of this object is required. Irregular environments scatter the light beam - but as it turns out, precisely this effect can be used to obtain optimum information in difficult situations. (2021-01-25)

Adding or subtracting single quanta of sound
Researchers perform experiments that can add or subtract a single quantum of sound--with surprising results when applied to noisy sound fields. (2021-01-25)

Major discovery helps explain coral bleaching
An EPFL scientist has made a major breakthrough in the understanding of coral bleaching -- a process that causes corals to lose their color and eventually leads to their death. The process is triggered by warmer ocean temperatures, and, according to the study, it begins much earlier than previously thought. The bleaching apparently results from a disturbance in the metabolic equilibrium between corals and their symbiotic algae, which feed them and give them their color. (2021-01-25)

Magnetic waves explain mystery of Sun's outer layer
in a new study published in The Astrophysical Journal, researchers combined observations from a telescope in New Mexico, the United States, with satellites located near Earth to identify a link between magnetic waves in the chromosphere and areas of abundant ionised particles in the hot outer atmosphere. (2021-01-22)

New heat method kills pathogens with minimal damage to plants
Turechek and colleagues set out to develop a new heat-based treatment that would kill pathogens without hurting the plant. When asked what most excited them about their research and their new method, Turechek responded, 'That it works! By introducing a lower-temperature conditioning step and using steam rather than hot water, we produced plants that were better able to withstand the higher temperature treatment designed to destroy the pathogen.' (2021-01-19)

Spreading the sound
Tsukuba University scientists describe the diffusion of sound in disordered materials, such as glass, using a new mathematical model. This work may lead to stronger and cheaper displays for touchscreen devices. (2021-01-15)

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