Current Heavy Drinkers News and Events

Current Heavy Drinkers News and Events, Heavy Drinkers News Articles.
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Scientists propose a new heavy particle similar to the Higgs boson
Unlike the Higgs boson, discovered at CERN's Large Hadron Collider in 2012 after a 40-year quest, the new particle proposed by these researchers is so heavy that it could not be produced directly even in this collider The University of Granada is among the participants in this major scientific advancement in Theoretical Physics, which could help unravel the mysteries of dark matter (2021-02-23)

Researchers discover potential new therapeutic targets on SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein
The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted considerable investigation into how the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein attaches to a human cell during the infection process, as this knowledge is useful in designing vaccines and therapeutics. Now, a team of scientists has discovered additional locations on the Spike protein that may not only help to explain how certain mutations make emerging variants more infectious but also could be used as additional targets for therapeutic intervention. (2021-02-22)

Certain factors are linked with an elevated risk of bone fractures
A new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research has identified various factors that may indicate whether a person faces a higher likelihood of experiencing a bone fracture over the next two decades. (2021-02-18)

Electricity source determines benefits of electrifying China's vehicles
Researchers have concluded air quality and public health benefits of EVs -- as well as their ability to reduce carbon emissions -- in China are dependent on the type of transport electrified and the composition of the electric grid. (2021-02-16)

Regular caffeine consumption affects brain structure
Coffee, cola or an energy drink: caffeine is the world's most widely consumed psychoactive substance. Researchers from the University of Basel have now shown in a study that regular caffeine intake can change the gray matter of the brain. However, the effect appears to be temporary. (2021-02-15)

A full-scale prototype for muon tomography
In this article of EPJ Plus, researchers build on previous studies into detection technologies and reconstruction algorithms for muon tomography, to develop a full-scale muon tomograph prototype. (2021-02-01)

Yangtze River observational system to improve East Asian rainy season forecasting
A major observation effort deploying airplanes, satellites and ground-based tracking systems was mounted in 2020 along the Yangtze River in China to better describe the physical processes that cause the mei-yu, an intense rainy season that occurs during East Asia's summer monsoon. (2021-01-29)

Efficient fluorescent materials and OLEDs for the NIR
Near-infrared emitters (NIR) will be of crucial importance for a variety of biomedical, security and defence applications, as well as for (in)visible light communications and the internet-of-things (IoT). Researchers from the UK and Italy have developed porphyrin oligomer NIR emitters which afford high efficiencies despite being totally free from heavy metals. They demonstrated organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) at 850 nm with 3.8% peak external quantum efficiency, together with a novel quantitative model of device efficiency. (2021-01-28)

How heavy is dark matter? Scientists radically narrow the potential mass range for the first time
Scientists have calculated the mass range for Dark Matter - and it's tighter than the science world thought. (2021-01-27)

Alpha particles lurk at the surface of neutron-rich nuclei
Scientists from an international collaboration have found evidence of alpha particles at the surface of neutron-rich heavy nuclei, providing new insights into the structure of neutron stars, as well as the process of alpha decay. (2021-01-21)

Filling a crucial gap in aquafarming: ion beam breeding to the rescue
Researchers at RIKEN, Japan successfully created a larger strain of zooplankton by creating mutations with a heavy ion beam, which contributes to improving the survival rate and growth of juvenile fish in aquaculture. (2021-01-15)

Helium nuclei at the surface of heavy nuclei discovered
Scientists are able to selectively knockout nucleons and preformed nuclear clusters from atomic nuclei using high-energy proton beams. In an experiment the existence of preformed helium nuclei at the surface of several tin isotopes could be identified in a reaction. The results confirm a theory, which predicts the formation of helium clusters in low-density nuclear matter and at the surface of heavy nuclei. (2021-01-15)

Limits of atomic nuclei predicted
Novel calculations have enabled the study of nearly 700 isotopes between helium and iron, showing which nuclei can exist and which cannot. In an article published in Physical Review Letters, scientists from TU Darmstadt, the University of Washington, the Canadian laboratory TRIUMF, and the University of Mainz report how they simulated for the first time using innovative theoretical methods a large region of the chart of nuclides based on the theory of the strong interaction. (2021-01-13)

Density of marijuana retailers linked to higher use among young adults
Researchers have begun to examine how the number of marijuana outlets influence use of the drug, but most of the work thus far has examined medical marijuana dispensaries prior to the opening of recreational retail outlets. The first study to look at both licensed and unlicensed recreational marijuana retailers finds that their density is associated with more use and a greater intensity of use among young adults. (2021-01-13)

Exciting times for efficient heavy-atom-free OLEDs
An international team including researchers from Osaka University has created an OLED material that combines the mechanisms of thermally activated delayed fluorescence and room-temperature phosphorescence. The hybrid emitter contains only abundant elements, making it more cost-effective and sustainable than heavy-atom-containing alternatives. By combining the two mechanisms the researchers demonstrated the most efficient heavy-atom-free RTP-based OLED to date. It is hoped that the findings will lead to more sustainable display technology. (2021-01-11)

Perceiving prosthesis as lighter thanks to neurofeedback
Transmitting sensory signals from prostheses to the nervous system helps leg amputees to perceive prosthesis as part of their body. While amputees generally perceive their prostheses as heavy, this feedback helps them to perceive the prostheses as significantly lighter, ETH researchers have shown. (2021-01-08)

Increase in pleasurable effects of alcohol over time can predict alcohol use disorder
A new study out of the University of Chicago Medicine following young adult drinkers for 10 years has found that individuals who reported the highest sensitivity to alcohol's pleasurable and rewarding effects at the start of the trial were more likely to develop an alcohol use disorder (AUD) over the course of the study. (2021-01-05)

Blood alcohol levels much lower than the legal limit impair hand-eye coordination
In previous studies, eye movements and vision were only affected at blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) approaching the legal limit for driving (0.08% BAC), in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. (2020-12-21)

New study shows every week of lockdown increases binge drinking
Study participants who regularly drank at harmful levels shown to consume six drinks per session, compared to two alcoholic beverages for those less regular binge drinkers. (2020-12-07)

Stay-at-home orders tied to an increase in harmful alcohol consumption, study finds
Binge drinkers increased their alcohol consumption by nearly 20% during COVID-19 stay-at-home orders, according to new research by public health experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). Their study, published in the American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, is one of the first to analyze the association of stress caused by the pandemic and dangerous alcohol consumption. (2020-12-07)

Low-dose CT for lung cancer screening: benefit outweighs potential harm
Low-dose CT for lung cancer screening: benefit outweighs potential harm An earlier initial diagnosis can reduce lung cancer mortality in heavy (ex-)smokers. The benefit outweighs the risk of harm from misdiagnosis or overdiagnosis. (2020-12-03)

Patients with heart rhythm disorder warned against heavy alcohol consumption
Fourteen drinks a week is linked with a higher risk of health problems including stroke and embolism in patients with atrial fibrillation, according to research published in EP Europace, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). ''Our study suggests that atrial fibrillation patients should avoid heavy alcohol consumption to prevent stroke and other complications,'' said author Dr. Boyoung Joung of Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. (2020-12-02)

Older adults in wealthier countries drink more alcohol
A new global study finds older people in wealthy countries consume more alcohol than their counterparts in middle-income countries, on average, although a higher cost of alcohol is associated with less frequent drinking. Across counties, people drink less as they get older, but at different rates and starting points. The study was led by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the Robert N. Butler Columbia Aging Center. Findings are published in the journal Addiction. (2020-12-01)

Hydrogen-powered heavy duty vehicles could contribute significantly to achieving climate goals
A partial transition of German road transport to hydrogen energy is among the possibilities being discussed to help meet national climate targets. Researcher from the IASS have examined the hypothetical transition to a hydrogen-powered transport sector through several scenarios. Their conclusion: A shift towards hydrogen-powered mobility could significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions and greatly improve air quality - in particular, heavy duty vehicles represent a low-hanging fruit for decarbonization of German road transport. (2020-12-01)

Researchers develop more efficient method to recover heavy oil
The current global supply of crude oil is expected to meet demand through 2050, but there may be a few more drops to squeeze out. By making use of a previously undesired side effect in oil recovery, researchers have developed a method that yields up to 20% more heavy oil than traditional methods. Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) team published their results on August 24 in Energy & Fuels, a journal of the American Chemical Society. (2020-11-21)

A filter for environmental remediation
Scientists at Osaka University discovered a new method for producing sodium titanate mats nanostructured in a seaweed-like morphology for filtering heavy metal ions and radioactive materials from water. This work may lead to advances in treating contaminated wastewater. (2020-11-19)

Dairy cows exposed to heavy metals worsen antibiotic-resistant pathogen crisis
Dairy cows, exposed for a few years to drinking water contaminated with heavy metals, carry more pathogens loaded with antimicrobial-resistance genes able to tolerate and survive various antibiotics. That's the finding of a team of researchers that conducted a study of two dairy herds in Brazil four years after a dam holding mining waste ruptured, and it spotlights a threat to human health, the researchers contend. (2020-11-16)

Observation of four-charm-quark structure
Hadrons are composed of quarks, a type of fundamental particle, bound by the strong interaction. Recently, the LHCb collaboration discovered a new state X(6900) , which matches the properties of an exotic four-charm-quark hadron. This unusual structure, which is observed for the first time, makes it a unique system to study the quantum chromodynamics, the theory of the strong interaction. (2020-11-11)

Connecting two classes of unconventional superconductors
The understanding of unconventional superconductivity is one of the most challenging and fascinating tasks of solid-state physics. Different classes of unconventional superconductors share that superconductivity emerges near a magnetic phase despite the underlying physics is different. (2020-11-11)

Black hole or no black hole: On the outcome of neutron star collisions
A new study lead by GSI scientists and international colleagues investigates black-hole formation in neutron star mergers. Computer simulations show that the properties of dense nuclear matter play a crucial role, which directly links the astrophysical merger event to heavy-ion collision experiments at GSI and FAIR. These properties will be studied more precisely at the future FAIR facility. The results have now been published in Physical Review Letters. (2020-11-10)

Surrey helps to produce the world's first neutron-rich, radioactive tantalum ions
An international team of scientists have unveiled the world's first production of a purified beam of neutron-rich, radioactive tantalum ions. (2020-11-10)

Water striders learn from experience how to jump up safely from water surface
Water striders jump upwards from the water surface without breaking it. This study shows that they learn through personal experience, just like we do, to adjust leg movements to their body weight and to jump without breaking the water surface. Only females do that. A female water strider needs this skill to adjust locomotion to the change in her weight each time when a male rides on he back during mating. (2020-11-05)

The cement for coral reefs
Coral reefs are hotspots of biodiversity. As they can withstand heavy storms, they offer many species a safe home. A team of researchers from Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and the University of Bayreuth have now discovered that a very specific type of 'cement' is responsible for the stability of coral reefs - by forming a hard calcareous skeleton, coralline red algae stabilise the reefs, and have been doing so for at least 150 million years. (2020-11-03)

Identifying biomolecule fragments in ionising radiation
In a new study published in EPJ D, researchers define for the first time the precise exact ranges in which positively and negatively charged fragments can be produced when living cells are bombarded with fast, heavy ions. (2020-10-29)

Trees prefer the big city life
A new study examines how trees respond to different urban intensities by comparing tree size and age, foliage nitrogen signature, nutrient and heavy metal content and other factors in forests in Newark, Del., and Philadelphia, Pa. Not only were the trees acclimated to urban conditions in the higher density Philadelphia forests, but the red maples there were actually healthier and more productive compared to those surrounded by less urbanization in Newark. (2020-10-16)

Supersized alcopops linked to homelessness and gang affiliation, new regulation needed
New George Mason University study of adults on probation finds that those who were gang-affiliated or recently experienced homelessness were far more likely to have recently consumed high alcohol content, flavored 'supersized alcopop' beverages in the past 30 days. Consumption was also linked to lower self-esteem. The study was led by Dr. Matthew Rossheim, assistant professor of global and community health in Mason's College of Health and Human Services. (2020-10-15)

Alcohol use changed right after COVID-19 lockdown
One in four adults reported a change in alcohol use almost immediately after stay-at-home orders were issued: 14% reported drinking more alcohol and reported higher levels of stress and anxiety than those who did not drink and those whose use stayed the same. The 11% who decreased their drinking also had higher levels of stress and anxiety--suggesting that any change in alcohol use may be associated with mental health issues. (2020-10-13)

RUDN University soil scientists: Green suburbs can be more harmful than city centers
A team of soil scientists from RUDN University confirmed that traditional approaches to urban soil pollution monitoring ignore actual risks for urban residents because they don't take into consideration the barrier function of the soil. The team used Moscow as an example to show that not only polluted downtown districts but also recreational parks and forest zones can pose a threat to people. (2020-10-07)

Astronomers turn up the heavy metal to shed light on star formation
Astronomers from The University of Western Australia's node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR) have developed a new way to study star formation in galaxies from the dawn of time to today. Using a new algorithm to model the energy and wavelengths of light coming from almost 7000 nearby galaxies, the researchers succeeded in reconstructing when most of the stars in the Universe formed--in agreement with telescope observations for the first time. (2020-10-06)

Alcohol consumption rises sharply during pandemic shutdown
Anecdotal information has suggested that people are buying and consuming more alcohol during the pandemic shutdown. Now some of the first survey-based information shows that American adults have sharply increased their consumption of alcohol during the pandemic, with women increasing their heavy drinking episodes (four or more drinks within a couple of hours) by 41%. (2020-09-29)

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