Current Heavy Metals News and Events

Current Heavy Metals News and Events, Heavy Metals News Articles.
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Protective ship coatings as an underestimated source of microplastic pollution
Shipping traffic can be a major source of microplastics, especially out in the open ocean. In a new study, a team of environmental geochemists from the University of Oldenburg (Germany) for the first time provides an overview of microplastics mass distribution in the North Sea. The scientists found that most of the plastic particles in water samples taken in the south-eastern North Sea originate from binders used in marine paints. Their hypothesis is that ships leave a kind of 'skid mark' in the water. (2021-02-23)

Scientists propose a new heavy particle similar to the Higgs boson
Unlike the Higgs boson, discovered at CERN's Large Hadron Collider in 2012 after a 40-year quest, the new particle proposed by these researchers is so heavy that it could not be produced directly even in this collider The University of Granada is among the participants in this major scientific advancement in Theoretical Physics, which could help unravel the mysteries of dark matter (2021-02-23)

Synthesis of a rare metal complex of nitrous oxide opens new vistas for
Like its chemical relative carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas and the dominant ozone-depleting substance. Strategies for limiting its emissions and its catalytic decomposition with metals are being developed. A study indicates that nitrous oxide can bind to metals similarly to carbon dioxide, which helps to design new complexes with even stronger bonding. This could allow the use of nitrous oxide in synthetic chemistry. (2021-02-22)

Researchers discover potential new therapeutic targets on SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein
The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted considerable investigation into how the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein attaches to a human cell during the infection process, as this knowledge is useful in designing vaccines and therapeutics. Now, a team of scientists has discovered additional locations on the Spike protein that may not only help to explain how certain mutations make emerging variants more infectious but also could be used as additional targets for therapeutic intervention. (2021-02-22)

Researchers grow artificial hairs with clever physics trick
Things just got hairy at Princeton. Researchers found they could coat a liquid elastic on the outside of a disc and spin it to form useful, complex patterns. When spun just right, tiny spindles rise from the material as it cures. The spindles grow as the disc accelerates, forming a soft solid that resembles hairs. Published in PNAS Feb. 22 (2021-02-22)

HKUST decodes a deep-sea vent-endemic snail hologenome
A research team led by Prof. QIAN Peiyuan, Head and Chair Professor from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST)'s Department of Ocean Science and David von Hansemann Professor of Science, has discovered that Gigantopelta snail houses both sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and methane-oxidizing bacteria inside its esophageal gland cells (part of digestive system) as endosymbionts, disclosing a novel dual symbiosis system and the molecular adaptation to the extreme environment, gaining a new understanding of the origin of life on Earth. (2021-02-19)

RUDN University chemist used iodine to synthesize new chalcogenides
A chemist from RUDN University, working with a group of colleagues, synthesized three new chalcogenides (compounds that contain metals and elements from group 16 of the periodic table). The team suggested an unusual approach to synthesis that was based on iodine. (2021-02-19)

Certain factors are linked with an elevated risk of bone fractures
A new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research has identified various factors that may indicate whether a person faces a higher likelihood of experiencing a bone fracture over the next two decades. (2021-02-18)

Plastic recycling results in rare metals being found in children's toys and food packaging
Scientists from the University of Plymouth and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign tested a range of new and used products - including children's toys, office equipment and cosmetic containers - and found they contained quantities of rare earth elements. (2021-02-17)

Electricity source determines benefits of electrifying China's vehicles
Researchers have concluded air quality and public health benefits of EVs -- as well as their ability to reduce carbon emissions -- in China are dependent on the type of transport electrified and the composition of the electric grid. (2021-02-16)

Links between pollution and cancer in wild animals: what can we learn?
This recent review combines the information available on cancer occurrences in aquatic and semi-aquatic animals. Cancer is one of the pollution-induced diseases that should be at the centre of attention in ecological and evolutionary research. Authors suggest physiological mechanisms that link pollution and cancer, determine which types of aquatic animals are more vulnerable to pollution-induced cancer, which types of pollution are mainly associated with cancer in aquatic ecosystems, and which types of cancer pollution causes. (2021-02-10)

Understanding catalytic couplings: not all synergies are simple
Negishi cross-coupling reactions have been widely used to form C-C bonds since the 1970s and are often perceived as the result of two metals (i.e zinc and palladium/nickel) working in synergy. Researchers from the Martin group at ICIQ have delved into the Negishi cross-coupling of aryl esters using nickel catalysis to understand how this reaction works at the molecular level and how to improve it. The results have been published in Nature Catalysis. (2021-02-08)

Fossil pigments shed new light on vertebrate evolution
This new paper shows that melanin is more than just something that gives colour to the body. It played an important role in the evolution of warm-blooded animals and helped defined what birds and mammals look like today. By studying where melanin occurs in the body in fossils and modern animals researchers have produced the first model for how melanin has evolved over the last 500 million years. (2021-02-04)

A full-scale prototype for muon tomography
In this article of EPJ Plus, researchers build on previous studies into detection technologies and reconstruction algorithms for muon tomography, to develop a full-scale muon tomograph prototype. (2021-02-01)

Yangtze River observational system to improve East Asian rainy season forecasting
A major observation effort deploying airplanes, satellites and ground-based tracking systems was mounted in 2020 along the Yangtze River in China to better describe the physical processes that cause the mei-yu, an intense rainy season that occurs during East Asia's summer monsoon. (2021-01-29)

Islands without structure inside metal alloys could lead to tougher materials
An international team of researchers produced islands of amorphous, non-crystalline material inside a class of new metal alloys known as high-entropy alloys. This discovery opens the door to applications in everything from landing gears, to pipelines, to automobiles. The new materials could make these lighter, safer, and more energy efficient. (2021-01-29)

Efficient fluorescent materials and OLEDs for the NIR
Near-infrared emitters (NIR) will be of crucial importance for a variety of biomedical, security and defence applications, as well as for (in)visible light communications and the internet-of-things (IoT). Researchers from the UK and Italy have developed porphyrin oligomer NIR emitters which afford high efficiencies despite being totally free from heavy metals. They demonstrated organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) at 850 nm with 3.8% peak external quantum efficiency, together with a novel quantitative model of device efficiency. (2021-01-28)

How heavy is dark matter? Scientists radically narrow the potential mass range for the first time
Scientists have calculated the mass range for Dark Matter - and it's tighter than the science world thought. (2021-01-27)

Dramatic increase in microplastics in seagrass soil since the 1970s
Large-scale production of vegetables and fruit in Spain with intensive plastic consumption in its greenhouse industry is believed to have leaked microplastic contaminants since the 1970s into the surrounding Mediterranean seagrass beds. This is shown in a new study where researchers have succeeded in tracing plastic pollution since the 1930s and 1940s by analyzing seagrass sediments. (2021-01-25)

Photocatalytic reaction in the shadow
Photoelectrochemical water splitting is a promising technology to convert solar energy into value-added fuels. Theoretically, silicon-based metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) photocathode can achieve high efficiency. However, the parasitic light absorption caused by catalysts and metals, as well as the lack of metals to form a large band-offset with p-Si, severely limit their performances. Scientists based in China have demonstrated an illumination-reaction decoupled MIS photocathode using n-Si to prevent the parasitic light absorption while establishing a large band-offset. (2021-01-25)

Single atoms as a catalyst: Surprising effects ensue
Catalysts are getting smaller - ''single-atom'' catalysts are the logical end point of this downsizing. However, individual atoms can no longer be described using the rules developed from larger pieces of metal, so the rules used to predict which metals will be good catalysts must be revamped - this has now been achieved at TU Wien. As it turns out, single atom catalysts based on much cheaper materials might be even more effective. (2021-01-22)

New technique builds super-hard metals from nanoparticles
Brown University researchers have shown a way to make bulk metals by smashing tiny metal nanoparticles together, which allows for customized grain structures and improved mechanical and other properties. (2021-01-22)

Teamwork in a molecule
Chemists at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena have demonstrated the value of 'teamwork' by successfully harnessing the interaction between two gallium atoms in a novel compound to split the particularly strong bond between fluorine and carbon. The gallium compound is also cheaper and more environmentally friendly than conventional alternatives. (2021-01-21)

Alpha particles lurk at the surface of neutron-rich nuclei
Scientists from an international collaboration have found evidence of alpha particles at the surface of neutron-rich heavy nuclei, providing new insights into the structure of neutron stars, as well as the process of alpha decay. (2021-01-21)

Zebra stripes, leopard spots: frozen metal patterns defy conventional metallurgy
''Stripy zebra, spotty leopard...'' Pattern formation and pattern recognition entertains children and scientists alike. Alan Turing's 1950s model explaining patterns in two-substance systems is used by metallurgists to explain microscopic internal stripes and spots. A study out today explains exotic patterns, counter to Turing's theory, forming on the liquid metal gallium, which melts in the hand. The previously ignored surface-solidification phenomenon improves fundamental understanding of liquid-metal alloys, with a potential patterning tool, and advanced applications in future electronics and optics. (2021-01-18)

Filling a crucial gap in aquafarming: ion beam breeding to the rescue
Researchers at RIKEN, Japan successfully created a larger strain of zooplankton by creating mutations with a heavy ion beam, which contributes to improving the survival rate and growth of juvenile fish in aquaculture. (2021-01-15)

Helium nuclei at the surface of heavy nuclei discovered
Scientists are able to selectively knockout nucleons and preformed nuclear clusters from atomic nuclei using high-energy proton beams. In an experiment the existence of preformed helium nuclei at the surface of several tin isotopes could be identified in a reaction. The results confirm a theory, which predicts the formation of helium clusters in low-density nuclear matter and at the surface of heavy nuclei. (2021-01-15)

Giving the hydrogen economy an acid test
Tsukuba University scientists show that the effectiveness of hydrogen-producing metal catalysts protected by graphene depends on the ability of protons to penetrate into the inner metallic surface. This work may lead to widely available hydrogen-powered cars. (2021-01-14)

Limits of atomic nuclei predicted
Novel calculations have enabled the study of nearly 700 isotopes between helium and iron, showing which nuclei can exist and which cannot. In an article published in Physical Review Letters, scientists from TU Darmstadt, the University of Washington, the Canadian laboratory TRIUMF, and the University of Mainz report how they simulated for the first time using innovative theoretical methods a large region of the chart of nuclides based on the theory of the strong interaction. (2021-01-13)

Density of marijuana retailers linked to higher use among young adults
Researchers have begun to examine how the number of marijuana outlets influence use of the drug, but most of the work thus far has examined medical marijuana dispensaries prior to the opening of recreational retail outlets. The first study to look at both licensed and unlicensed recreational marijuana retailers finds that their density is associated with more use and a greater intensity of use among young adults. (2021-01-13)

'Swiss Army knife' catalyst can make natural gas burn cleaner
'Swiss Army knife' catalyst can bring the combustion temperature of methane down by about half - from above 1400 degrees Kelvin down to 600 to 700 degrees Kelvin. (2021-01-11)

Discovery of quantum behavior in insulators suggests possible new particle
A team led by Princeton physicists discovered a surprising quantum phenomenon in an atomically thin insulator made of tungsten ditelluride. The results suggest the formation of completely new types of quantum phases previously hidden in insulators. (2021-01-11)

Exciting times for efficient heavy-atom-free OLEDs
An international team including researchers from Osaka University has created an OLED material that combines the mechanisms of thermally activated delayed fluorescence and room-temperature phosphorescence. The hybrid emitter contains only abundant elements, making it more cost-effective and sustainable than heavy-atom-containing alternatives. By combining the two mechanisms the researchers demonstrated the most efficient heavy-atom-free RTP-based OLED to date. It is hoped that the findings will lead to more sustainable display technology. (2021-01-11)

Liquid metal ink liberates form
POSTECH-Yonsei University joint research team develops liquid metal ink for 3D circuit lines. (2021-01-10)

Perceiving prosthesis as lighter thanks to neurofeedback
Transmitting sensory signals from prostheses to the nervous system helps leg amputees to perceive prosthesis as part of their body. While amputees generally perceive their prostheses as heavy, this feedback helps them to perceive the prostheses as significantly lighter, ETH researchers have shown. (2021-01-08)

Researchers question fundamental study on the Kondo effect
In 1998, spectroscopic studies on the Kondo effect using scanning tunnelling microscopy were published, which are considered ground-breaking and have triggered countless others of a similar kind. Many of these studies may have to be re-examined now that researchers from J├╝lich, Germany have shown that the Kondo effect cannot be proven beyond doubt by this method. Instead, another phenomenon is creating precisely the spectroscopic ''fingerprint'' that was previously attributed to the Kondo effect. (2021-01-07)

Atomic-scale nanowires can now be produced at scale
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have discovered a way to make self-assembled nanowires of transition metal chalcogenides at scale using chemical vapor deposition. By changing the substrate where the wires form, they can tune how these wires are arranged, from aligned configurations of atomically thin sheets to random networks of bundles. This paves the way to industrial deployment in next-gen industrial electronics, including energy harvesting, and transparent, efficient, even flexible devices. (2020-12-24)

Theory describes quantum phenomenon in nanomaterials
Theoretical physicists Yoshimichi Teratani and Akira Oguri of Osaka City University, and Rui Sakano of the University of Tokyo have developed mathematical formulas that describe a physical phenomenon happening within quantum dots and other nanosized materials. The formulas, published in the journal Physical Review Letters, could be applied to further theoretical research about the physics of quantum dots, ultra-cold atomic gasses, and quarks. (2020-12-23)

Exposure to metals can impact pregnancy
Exposure to metals such as nickel, arsenic, cobalt and lead may disrupt a woman's hormones during pregnancy, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-12-21)

Speeding toward improved hydrogen fuel production
A new material developed by a team led by Berkeley Lab will help to make hydrogen a viable energy source for a wide range of applications. (2020-12-21)

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