Current Hemoglobin News and Events

Current Hemoglobin News and Events, Hemoglobin News Articles.
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CRISPR technology to cure sickle cell disease at UIC
The first cases treated with gene-editing technology were recently published in an article co-authored by Dr. Damiano Rondelli, the Michael Reese Professor of Hematology at the UIC College of Medicine. The article reports two patients have been cured of beta thalassemia and sickle cell disease after their own genes were edited with CRISPR-Cas9 technology. The two researchers who invented this technology received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2020. (2021-01-20)

Transfusions with higher red blood cell levels do not improve preterm baby outcomes
National Institutes of Health-funded randomized clinical trial is the largest study to-date to compare thresholds for blood transfusions in premature babies, offers guidance for health care providers. (2020-12-31)

Higher red cell transfusion threshold offers no advantage for treating preterm infants
Very low birthweight infants often need blood transfusions to survive. A National Institutes of Health-funded study suggests that providing a higher threshold of red cells within accepted limits offers no advantage in survival or reduction in neurological impairment over a lower threshold. (2020-12-30)

Pneumolysis: High altitude specialists explain lung destruction caused by COVID-19
According to the scientific paper, COVID-19's hypoxemia (low oxygen tension in the blood) can hardly be handled by ventilators and should not be considered as pneumonia or treated as a SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome). (2020-12-21)

Rapid lateral flow immunoassay developed for fluorescence detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA
Scientists from the Suzhou Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Technology have developed a novel amplification-free rapid SARS-CoV-2 nucleic acid detection platform based on hybrid capture fluorescence immunoassay (HC-FIA). (2020-12-10)

More years of obesity means higher risk of disease, study finds
A greater obesity duration is associated with worse values for all cardiometabolic disease factors, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Tom Norris of Loughborough University, UK, and colleagues. (2020-12-08)

Integrated anemia-SCD test demonstrates accurate results in study at 2020 ASH meeting
Researchers from Case Western Reserve University presented research today in which Hemex Health's affordable Gazelle platform diagnostic technology successfully tested 46 patients with 100% sensitivity and over 92.3% specificity for anemia and with 100% accuracy for hemoglobin variants. The preliminary study included blood samples collected from Cleveland-area patients studied for anemia and sickle cell disease. (2020-12-05)

SARS-CoV-2 might attack red marrow and block new erythrocytes formation
Specialists from the Department of Fundamental Medicine of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) with Russian and Japanese colleagues have probed into mechanisms of COVID-19 inside-the-body distribution linked to erythrocytes damaging. According to researchers, virus might attack red marrow, thus being detrimental not only for erythrocytes in the bloodstream but also for the process of the formation of the new ones. A related article appears in Archiv EuroMedica. (2020-10-30)

Affinity vs. cooperativity
Our biological processes rely on a system of communications -- cellular signals -- that set off chain reactions in and between target cells to produce a response. The first step in these often complex communications is the moment a molecule binds to a receptor on or in a cell, prompting changes that can trigger further signals that propagate across systems. From food tasting and blood oxygenation during breathing to drug therapy, receptor binding is the fundamental mechanism that unlocks a multitude of biological functions and responses. (2020-10-29)

Acute kidney injury among African Americans with sickle cell trait and disease
New research examines the risk of acute kidney injury in people with sickle cell trait or disease, as well as the effect of acute kidney injury on kidney function decline in these individuals. Results from the study will be presented online during ASN Kidney Week 2020 Reimagined October 19-October 25. (2020-10-23)

New technology diagnoses sickle cell disease in record time
Researchers have developed a new way to diagnose diseases of the blood like sickle cell disease with sensitivity and precision and in only one minute. (2020-10-15)

Rodent ancestors combined portions of blood and venom genes to make pheromones
Experts who study animal pheromones have traced the evolutionary origins of genes that allow mice, rats and other rodents to communicate through smell. The discovery is a clear example of how new genes can evolve through the random chance of molecular tinkering and may make identifying new pheromones easier in future studies. The results represent a genealogy for the exocrine-gland secreting peptide (ESP) gene family. (2020-09-30)

Kawasaki disease is not a homogenous disease nor are its triggers
Researchers at UC San Diego report that while Kawasaki disease occurs in clusters, the traits, and thus the triggers of the inflammatory disease vary among clusters. (2020-09-29)

Blood breakdown product commandeers important enzyme
The hemoglobin in the red blood cells ensures that our body cells receive sufficient oxygen. When the blood pigment is broken down, 'heme' is produced, which in turn can influence the protein cocktail in the blood. Researchers at the University of Bonn have now discovered in complex detective work that the 'activated protein C' (APC) can be commandeered by heme. At the same time, APC can also reduce the toxic effect of heme. (2020-09-04)

Lactobacillus hilgardii LMG 7934 genome deciphered at Kazan Federal University
The team is led by Associate Professor Ayrat Kayumov (Department of Genetics, Kazan Federal University). In this research, the scientists not only performed genome sequencing, but also found a completely new type of PII-Like Protein PotN. (2020-08-19)

Unraveling the initial molecular events of respiration
Physicists from Switzerland, Japan and Germany have unveiled the mechanism by which the first event of respiration takes place in heme proteins. (2020-08-18)

Tibetan antelope thrive at high altitudes using a juvenile form of blood oxygen transport
Adult Tibetan antelope have overcome oxygen deprivation on the high-altitude Tibetan Plateau through an unusual adaptation in which they permanently express a form of hemoglobin (the iron-containing oxygen transport protein in red blood cells) that other members of the cattle family only express as juveniles or when under extreme oxygen deprivation. (2020-06-17)

Continuous glucose monitoring reduces hypoglycemia in older adults with type 1 diabetes
Laura Young, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine, was UNC's principal investigator for this six-month clinical trial that shows the use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) reduces serious levels of hypoglycemia compared with standard monitoring by daily use of blood glucose finger-stick test strips. (2020-06-16)

C. diff captures blood cell cofactor to build defensive shield
In a cruel twist, the bacterium Clostridioides difficile (C. diff) makes us bleed and then uses our blood to defend itself against us. (2020-06-10)

Synthetic red blood cells mimic natural ones, and have new abilities
Scientists have tried to develop synthetic red blood cells that mimic the favorable properties of natural ones, such as flexibility, oxygen transport and long circulation times. But so far, most artificial red blood cells have had one or a few, but not all, key features of the natural versions. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have made synthetic red blood cells that have all of the cells' natural abilities, plus a few new ones. (2020-06-03)

New streamlined assay can improve prenatal detection of alpha-thalassemia
In a report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, published by Elsevier, researchers describe a rapid, accurate novel assay for nondeletional alpha-thalassemia genotyping based on one-step nested asymmetric PCR melting curve analysis, which may enhance prenatal diagnosis, newborn screening, and large-scale population screening. (2020-05-29)

Gold mining with mercury poses health threats for miles downstream
Small-scale gold mining in the Peruvian Amazon poses a health hazard not only to the miners and communities near where mercury is used to extract gold from ore, but also to downstream communities hundreds of kilometers away where people eat mercury-contaminated river fish as part of their diet. Downstream children under 12 with the highest levels of mercury in their bodies were found to have lost IQ points and become anemic. (2020-05-28)

High-resolution 3D view inside tumors
Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. But individual tumors can vary significantly, presenting different spatial patterns within their mass. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Zentrum München have now succeeded in visualizing spatial changes within tumors by means of optoacoustics. This method may be helpful for the future development of new drugs. (2020-05-26)

Glucose levels linked to maternal mortality even in non-diabetic women
An elevated pre-pregnancy hemoglobin A1c--which measures average blood glucose concentration--is associated with a higher risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes even in women without known diabetes, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Joel Ray of ICES and the University of Toronto, Canada, and colleagues. (2020-05-22)

New mobile health tool measures hemoglobin without drawing blood
Researchers have developed a way to use smartphone images of a person's eyelids to assess blood hemoglobin levels. The ability to perform one of the most common clinical lab tests without a blood draw could help reduce the need for in-person clinic visits, make it easier to monitor patients who are in critical condition, and improve care in low- and middle-income countries where access to testing laboratories is limited. (2020-05-21)

Measuring blood damage
Red blood cells sometimes rupture when blood is sent through faulty equipment, such as a dialysis machine. This is called hemolysis. Hemolysis also can occur during blood work when blood is drawn too quickly through a needle, leading to defective laboratory samples. University of Delaware mechanical engineer Tyler Van Buren and collaborating colleagues at Princeton University have developed a method to monitor blood damage in real-time. (2020-05-21)

Researchers reveal origins of complex hemoglobin by resurrecting ancient proteins
Researchers trace the evolutionary origins of hemoglobin by resurrecting ancient proteins from more than 400 million years ago. (2020-05-20)

New MDS subtype proposed based on presence of genetic mutation
In a special report published today in the journal Blood, an international working group of experts in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) proposes -- for the first time -- the recognition of a distinct subtype of MDS based on the presence of a nonheritable genetic mutation that causes the disease. The mutation is found in approximately one in every five patients with MDS. (2020-04-29)

A diet of high-iron beans improves health of anemic women in Rwanda
A new study involving women of reproductive age in Rwanda, where 19% of that demographic is anemic, showed that a diet including high-iron beans can improve iron status and physical performance relatively quickly. (2020-04-29)

Experimental AI tool predicts which COVID-19 patients develop respiratory disease
An artificial intelligence tool accurately predicted which patients newly infected with the COVID-19 virus would go on to develop severe respiratory disease, a new study found. (2020-03-30)

'Levitating' proteins could help diagnose opioid abuse, other diseases
Researchers at the Precision Health Program have helped develop a new method called 'magnetic levitation' for detecting the density of proteins in the blood -- a method that could vastly improve the rate at which diseases are detected and diagnosed. (2020-02-04)

Molecular understanding of drug interactions suggests pathway to better malaria treatments
Researchers have for the first time demonstrated what happens at the molecular level when two compounds known to inhibit crystal growth were combined, yielding new insights into malaria treatments and, more broadly, improving the process of drug development. (2020-01-15)

'Ageotypes' provide window into how individuals age, Stanford study reports
Stanford scientists have identified specific biological pathways along which individuals age over time. (2020-01-13)

How malaria parasites become resistant to artemisinin antimalarial drugs
Malaria parasite mutations that inhibit the endocytoic appetite for a host's red blood cells may render them resistant to artemisinin, a widely used frontline antimalarial drug, according to a new study, which reveals a key molecular mechanism of drug resistance. (2020-01-02)

Hematopoietic stem cell marker: A key player in the ontogeny of hematopoiesis
A research team led by Osaka University revealed that Endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule, a surface marker for hematopoietic stem cells and vascular endothelial cells, played an important role in the ontogeny of hematopoiesis in mice, particularly in the development of adult-type erythropoiesis. (2019-12-26)

Discovery of an unusual protein
Scientists from Bremen discover an unusual protein playing a significant role in the Earth's nitrogen cycle. The novel heme-containing cytochrome is involved in the anammox process, which is responsible for producing half of the dinitrogen gas in the atmosphere and important in greenhouse gas regulation. (2019-12-02)

Study sheds new light on role iron biology plays in disease
New research shows that the body's system for regulating iron is much more complex than originally thought--and this has surprising implications in at least three human diseases, according to a new study by University of Alberta biologists. (2019-11-29)

Important gene variants found in certain African populations
In the nearly 20 years since the Human Genome Project was completed, experts in genetic variants increasingly have raised concerns about the overemphasis on studying people of European descent when performing large population studies. A study appearing Oct. 31 in the journal Cell aims to address some of this disparity by focusing on populations living in rural Uganda, thus revealing several new genetic variants related to human health. (2019-10-31)

Malaria pathogen under the X-ray microscope
Malaria is one of the most threatening infectious diseases in the world. An international team has now been able to investigate malaria pathogens in red blood cells in vivo using the BESSY II X-ray microscope and the ALBA and ESRF synchrotron sources. The studies reveal the mechanisms used by active substances to attack the pathogen. This could contribute to improvement of treatment strategies and drugs. (2019-10-30)

Iron availability in seawater, key to explaining the amount and distribution of fish
A new paper led by ICTA-UAB researchers Eric Galbraith and Priscilla Le Mézo and published in the journal Frontiers in Marine Science proposes that the available iron supply in large areas of the ocean is insufficient for most fish, and that -- as a result -- there are fewer fish in the ocean than there would be if iron were more plentiful. (2019-10-24)

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