Current Hepatitis News and Events

Current Hepatitis News and Events, Hepatitis News Articles.
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Targeting the SARS-CoV-2 main protease yields promise in transgenic mouse model
Inhibitors based on approved drugs and designed to disrupt the SARS-CoV-2 viral protein Mpro display strong antiviral activity both in vitro and in a transgenic mouse model, a new study reports. (2021-02-18)

New combination therapy offers chance of healing hepatitis B
Around 260 million people, more than three percent of the global population, are chronically infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV); in the long term, this often leads to complications such as liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. A cure is not yet possible with the available medication. Scientists at the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) and the University Hospital Eppendorf (UKE) have now investigated a new combination therapy that has proven highly effective in their infection model. (2021-02-04)

Retrained generic antibodies can recognize SARS-CoV-2
An alternative approach to train the immunity response is offered by researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago and California State University at Sacramento who have developed a novel strategy that redirects antibodies for other diseases existing in humans to the spike proteins of SARS-CoV-2. (2021-02-03)

The Lancet: Study estimates that, without vaccination against 10 diseases, mortality in children under five would be 45% higher in low-income and middle-income countries
Vaccinations against 10 major pathogens have a substantial impact on public health in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs), according to new modelling research published in The Lancet. The study estimated that from 2000 to 2019 vaccinations have prevented 37 million deaths, and that this figure will increase to 69 million deaths for the period 2000-2030. Most of this impact is estimated to be among children younger than five years, most notably from measles vaccinations. (2021-01-28)

Armouring anti-cancer T cells against immunosuppressants
New 'armoured' T cells attack cancer without being suppressed by drugs given to transplant patients to avoid organ rejection. (2021-01-18)

One-year kidney allograft outcomes do not differ by hepatitis C status of donor
Study published in AJKD shows that kidney allograft outcomes one year post-transplantation in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-negative recipients do not differ by the HCV status of the donor. (2020-12-14)

Insights on a mechanism to stop COVID-19 replication
Stopping the replication of SARS-CoV-2 is likely possible thanks to a compound called EBSELEN: a group of researchers from the Politecnico di Milano has communicated aspects relevant to the blocking of replication mechanism in the New Journal of Chemistry. (2020-11-19)

'Meet people where they are:' local health departments key to hepatitis B vaccination
A study led by Stacy Tressler--who earned her doctorate in epidemiology from the West Virginia University School of Public Health--suggests that local health departments are vital to getting the hepatitis B vaccine to the people who need it most. (2020-11-17)

X-ray study explores potential of hepatitis C drugs to treat COVID-19
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory investigated the binding properties of several hepatitis C drugs to determine how well they inhibit the SARS-CoV-2 main protease, a crucial protein enzyme that enables the novel coronavirus to reproduce. Inhibiting, or blocking, the protease from functioning is vital to stopping the virus from spreading in patients with COVID-19. (2020-11-16)

Researchers discover enzyme suppressing immune response to viral infections
Viruses such as HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C evade or disrupt the immune system to create persistent infections. These viruses remain a serious health threat, but researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have discovered how an enzyme that regulates several cellular processes might be a key target to preventing viruses from disarming the human immune response. (2020-11-10)

Ontario should vaccinate newborns for hepatitis B, study suggests
Not all pregnant women are universally screened for hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Ontario, even though this screening is recommended, and the majority of those who test positive do not receive follow-up testing or interventions, leading to infections of newborns, found new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2020-10-26)

A promising discovery could lead to better treatment for Hepatitis C
Virologists at Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) have identified a critical role played by a cellular protein in the progression of Hepatitis C virus infection, paving the way for more effective treatment. No vaccine currently exists for Hepatitis C virus infection, which affects more than 130 million people worldwide and nearly 250,000 Canadians. Antivirals exist but are expensive and not readily available in developing countries, where the disease is most prevalent. (2020-10-22)

What San Diego's Hepatitis A outbreak can teach us during COVID-19
The disconnect between the public and government agencies, and how information is communicated on social media during an outbreak was the focus of a study by San Diego State University researchers. They found key lessons that can be applied to the COVID-19 pandemic, which could stem the tide of misinformation currently happening. (2020-10-15)

SHEA updates guidance for healthcare workers with HIV, hepatitis
In light of the low rate of transmission and advances in treatments for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and HIV, SHEA released updated guidance for healthcare personnel living with these bloodborne pathogens based on the latest available science. The SHEA White Paper, ''Management of Healthcare Personnel Living with Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, or Human Immunodeficiency Virus in United States Healthcare Institutions,'' was published online in the journal Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. (2020-10-14)

New research supports sofosbuvir in combination with other antivirals for COVID-19
Columbia Engineering researchers report that Sofosbuvir-terminated RNA is more resistant to the proofreader of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, than Remdesivir-terminated RNA. The results of the new study, published today by the Nature Research journal Scientific Reports, support the use of the FDA-approved hepatitis C drug EPCLUSA--Sofosbuvir/Velpatasvir--in combination with other drugs in COVID-19 clinical trials. (2020-10-06)

Kidneys infected with hepatitis C can be safely transplanted into healthy recipients
Kidneys infected with hepatitis C can be safely transplanted into healthy recipients (2020-09-02)

Premature deaths from alcoholic liver disease rising as gap between men and women narrows
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine identifies emerging patterns in the rate of and age at premature death from alcoholic (alcohol-associated) liver disease (ALD) in the US over the last two decades. Significantly, the study documents that since the early 2000s, ALD death rates among non-Hispanic whites, particularly women, have increased more rapidly than rates among non-Hispanic blacks. (2020-08-27)

UofSC researchers reveal how THC may treat acute respiratory distress syndrome
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), when caused by a bacterial toxin known as Staphylococcal enterotoxin, can be completely prevented by treatment with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a cannabinoid found in the cannabis plant. (2020-08-26)

Hepatitis B: Natural controllers shed light on immunity mechanisms
To improve our understanding of the antibody response conferring protection against HBV infection, scientists from the Institut Pasteur and Inserm, in collaboration with the Roche Innovation Center in Switzerland, produced and characterized human monoclonal antibodies specific to viral envelope antigens, referred as HBsAg, from blood memory B cells isolated from HBV vaccinees and natural controllers. (2020-08-13)

Busting Up the Infection Cycle of Hepatitis B
Researchers at the University of Delaware have gained new understanding of the virus that causes hepatitis B and the ''spiky ball'' that encloses its genetic blueprint. They looked at how the capsid--a protein shell that protects the blueprint and also drives the delivery of it to infect a host cell--assembles itself. The capsid is an important target in developing drugs to treat hepatitis B, a life-threatening and incurable infection that afflicts more than 250 million people worldwide. (2020-08-13)

Malaria discovery could expedite antiviral treatment for COVID-19
New research into malaria suggests targeting enzymes from the human host, rather than from the pathogen itself, could offer effective treatment for a range of infectious diseases, including COVID-19. (2020-08-11)

Strong link found between abnormal liver tests and poor COVID-19 outcomes
New Haven, Conn. -- Researchers at the Yale Liver Center found that patients with COVID-19 presented with abnormal liver tests at much higher rates than suggested by earlier studies. They also discovered that higher levels of liver enzymes -- proteins released when the liver is damaged -- were associated with poorer outcomes for these patients, including ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, and death. (2020-08-07)

SFU chemist's new process fast-tracks drug treatments for viral infections and cancer
Discovering antiviral and anticancer drugs will soon be faster and cheaper thanks to new research from Simon Fraser University chemist Robert Britton and his international team. (2020-08-07)

Unveiled: A channel SARS-CoV-2 may use to proceed with viral replication in the host cell
By visualizing coronavirus replication in an infected host cell, researchers may have answered a long-standing question about how newly synthesized coronavirus components are able to be incorporated into fully infectious viruses. (2020-08-06)

Stay or leave? A tale of two virus strategies revealed by math
By modeling experimentally measured characteristics of cells infected with hepatitis C in the lab, researchers in Japan found that one virus strain was roughly three times more likely to use copied genetic code to create new viruses compared to another, which instead tended to keep more copies inside an infected cell to accelerate replication. Understanding specific strategies adopted by viruses through such modeling could aid the development of effective therapeutic methods. (2020-07-30)

Viral hepatitis: Europe needs to close the testing gap
Approximately four in five people living with hepatitis B and three out of four people with hepatitis C infection across the European Union and European Economic Area (EU/EEA) and the UK have not yet been diagnosed. This is a major obstacle on the way towards the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) for health in 2030 as highlighted by ECDC on occasion of World Hepatitis Day. (2020-07-27)

Closing the gap: finding undiagnosed hepatitis C infections after blood transfusions
What is the incidence of viral hepatitis caused by blood transfusions before and after Sweden introduced screening of blood in the early 1990s? In an article published in Eurosurveillance ahead of World Hepatitis Day on 28 July, the authors also try to estimate how many people of those who were infected with hepatitis B and C through blood transfusion still live with undiagnosed hepatitis. (2020-07-23)

Pasteurizing breast milk inactivates SARS-CoV-2
Pasteurizing breast milk using a common technique inactivates severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) making it safe for use, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). ttps://www.cmaj.ca/content/cmaj/early/2020/07/09/cmaj.201309.full.pdf (2020-07-09)

Hepatitis C management at federally qualified health centers proves cost-effective
BOSTON- New research from Boston Medical Center shows that routine Hepatitis C (HCV) testing at federally qualified health centers (FQHC) improves diagnosis rates and health outcomes for people with HCV infections in the United States, and is cost-effective. The formerly recommended targeted testing approach was shown to provide worse outcomes at a higher cost when compared to routine testing. (2020-07-08)

Researchers identify multiple molecules that shut down SARS-Cov-2 polymerase reaction
Researchers at Columbia Engineering and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have identified a library of molecules that shut down the SARS-CoV-2 polymerase reaction, a key step that establishes the potential of these molecules as lead compounds to be further modified for the development of COVID-19 therapeutics. Five of these molecules are already FDA-approved for use in the treatment of other viral infections including HIV/AIDS, cytomegalovirus, and hepatitis B. (2020-06-30)

Study finds HCV-positive livers safe for transplantation; Patients cured afterward
UC researchers find similar results for positive outcomes when comparing patients receiving livers infected with hepatitis C to patients who receive livers without infection. (2020-06-22)

Virus co-opts immune protein to avoid antiviral defences
By discovering a trick the hepatitis C virus uses to evade the immune system, scientists have identified a new antiviral defence system that could be used to treat many virus infections, according to new research published today in eLife. (2020-06-16)

Researchers discover key player in hepatitis A virus infection
University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers designed experiments using gene-editing tools to discover how molecules called gangliosides serve as de facto gatekeepers to allow the virus entry into liver cells and trigger disease. (2020-05-26)

Liver cancer: Awareness of hepatitis D must be raised
Scientists from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and the Geneva University Hospitals (HUG) have studied the most serious consequence of chronic hepatitis: hepatocellular carcinoma. They demonstrated that people infected with Hepatitis D have up to three times the risk of developing that particularly aggressive and often fatal liver cancer compared to those infected only with Hepatitis B. These results, to be read in the Journal of Hepatology, plead for systematic screening of Hepatitis D in patients with Hepatitis B. (2020-05-18)

Supercomputer simulations present potential active substances against coronavirus
Several drugs approved for treating hepatitis C viral infection were identified as potential candidates against COVID-19, a new disease caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. This is the result of research based on extensive calculations using the MOGON II supercomputer at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU). (2020-05-05)

Racial inequalities in liver cancer deaths soared after launch of hepatitis C drugs
Before and after the introduction of lifesaving drugs for hepatitis C, researchers found that from 1979 to 1998, racial inequalities in mortality from liver cancer in the US were declining. But, from 1998 to 2016, of the 16,770 deaths from liver cancer among blacks, the excess relative to whites increased from 27.8 percent to 45.4 percent. Concurrently, racial inequalities in death decreased for major risk factors for liver cancer, such as alcohol, obesity and diabetes. (2020-04-30)

New findings on hepatitis C in infants can lead to improved treatments
Only about 5% of the babies born to mothers with hepatitis C are themselves infected by the disease. A possible reason for this low figure is that the baby's immune system has already destroyed the virus before birth. A new study from researchers at Karolinska Institutet published in the journal Gut reveals clear adaptations of the uninfected babies' immune system that can lead the way to new treatment methods. (2020-04-27)

How the immune system reacts to hepatitis C viruses
The interferon-stimulated gene C19orf66 plays an important role in the defence against hepatitis C viruses. A research team at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) headed by Professor Eike Steinmann from the Department for Molecular and Medical Virology has now studied how C19orf66 works. The results show that C19orf66 disrupts the formation of the viral replication machinery. (2020-04-24)

New macrolactone database could aid drug discovery, research
Researchers have created a free-to-use database of 14,000 known macrolactones -- large molecules used in drug development -- which contains information about the molecular characteristics, chemical diversity and biological activities of this structural class. (2020-04-21)

Increased rate of infections may indicate a future cancer diagnosis
Patients experienced a greater occurrence of infections in the years preceding a cancer diagnosis. (2020-04-17)

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