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Current Hepatitis News and Events, Hepatitis News Articles.
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Large majority of Washington state's heroin users want to reduce use
A new survey of people who inject illicit drugs in the state of Washington yields positive and important findings for policy makers as the world struggles to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-04-10)

New hepatitis C cases down by almost 70% in HIV positive men in London and Brighton
New cases of hepatitis C amongst HIV positive men in London and Brighton have fallen by nearly 70% in recent years. (2020-03-25)

Study uncovers increasing global rates of liver cancer
New research reveals rising rates of liver cancer around the world, despite advances aimed at preventing the disease. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society (ACS). (2020-03-23)

Low-dose aspirin linked to reduced liver cancer risk
Among adults at high risk of liver cancer, those who took low-dose aspirin were less likely to develop the disease or to die from liver-related causes. (2020-03-12)

Princeton researchers identify factors essential for chronic hepatitis B infection
A study published in the journal Nature Microbiology identified factors that the hepatitis B virus uses when establishing long-term infection in the liver. The findings could help lead to treatment strategies for chronic HBV infection, a condition that increases the risk of developing liver cancer and is responsible for almost 900,000 deaths worldwide each year. (2020-03-09)

Liver fibrosis tied to specific heart failure, regardless of HIV or hepatitis C status
While there is an association between liver fibrosis and heart failure, the mechanisms for this association are currently unclear but may be of particular importance for people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and/or hepatitis C, both of which are chronic infections that affect the liver and heart. (2020-03-06)

OHSU-led evidence review shows new therapy for Hepatitis C is highly effective
New direct-acting antiviral therapies are highly effective at eliminating the Hepatitis C virus infection, according to a systematic evidence review by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University. The review, published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association, informed a new recommendation by the U.S. Preventive Health Task Force for universal screening of Hepatitis C (2020-03-02)

Intervention to help GPs identify and treat patients with hepatitis C found to be effective
The first UK clinical trial to increase the identification and treatment of hepatitis C (HCV) patients in primary care has been found to be effective, acceptable to staff and highly cost-effective for the NHS. The University of Bristol-led Hepatitis C Assessment to Treatment Trial (HepCATT), published in the British Medical Journal today, provides robust evidence of effective action GPs should take to increase HCV testing and treatment. (2020-02-26)

Big investment needed to eliminate Hep C in Pakistan could deliver huge health benefits
A large investment of at least US$3.9 billion needed to meet the World Health Organization's (WHO) target for the elimination of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) in Pakistan could deliver huge benefits in terms of lives saved and reduced ill health, according to University of Bristol led research published in The Lancet Global Health today [19 February]. (2020-02-19)

Kidney patients benefit using organs from Hepatitis C-infected donors
Kidney patients benefit by accepting kidneys from donors with hepatitis C, according to a University of Cincinnati physician-researcher. Making the choice reduces organ wait time for kidney patients while saving money over the long run. It also improves the quality of life and life expectancy for kidney patients. (2020-02-17)

Tennessee infants exposed to hepatitis C at birth often not tested for virus
Most Tennessee infants exposed to hepatitis C at birth are not later tested to see if they acquired the virus, according to a study by researchers at Monroe Carell Jr. Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt and the Vanderbilt Center for Child Health Policy. (2020-02-14)

Hepatitis B: New therapeutic approach may help to cure chronic hepatitis B infection
Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum M√ľnchen, Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF) have developed a novel therapeutic approach to cure chronic hepatitis B. (2020-02-03)

Liver fibrosis 'off switch' discovered in mice
UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers identified several genetic switches, or transcription factors, that determine whether or not liver cells produce collagen -- providing a new therapeutic target for liver fibrosis. (2020-01-23)

Antiviral treatments inspire researchers to develop a new kind of cancer drug
An effort to thwart viral diseases like hepatitis or the common cold led to a new collaboration and a novel class of cancer drugs that appears effective in mice. (2020-01-22)

First robust cell culture model for the hepatitis E virus
A mutation switches the turbo on during virus replication. This is a blessing for research. (2020-01-13)

Heart transplants from donors with hepatitis C may be safe and could help decrease organ shortage
One-year survival was 90% for adults with severe heart failure who received a heart transplant from a donor with hepatitis C, which was nearly identical to those who received a heart from donors who did not have hepatitis C (91%). Rates of organ rejection, stroke and kidney dialysis were similar between the two groups. More research is needed to assess longer-term results, however, increased use of hearts from donors with hepatitis C could help overcome the national shortage of donor organs. (2020-01-08)

FSU study aids fight against HIV, hepatitis B
A discovery by Florida State University College of Medicine researchers is expected to open the door for new and more potent treatment options for many of the more than 36 million people worldwide infected with the HIV virus and for others chronically ill with hepatitis B. (2020-01-08)

Hepatitis C-positive donors a viable option to expand heart donor pool
Patients who were transplanted with hearts from hepatitis C-positive donors had comparable outcomes after one year to patients who received hearts from donors that didn't have the disease, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published in JAMA Cardiology. (2019-12-20)

Hepatitis D: The mystery of the virus' life cycle revealed
A team led by INRS Professor Patrick Labonté has identified the role of a key process in the replication cycle of the hepatitis D virus, an infection that is still very difficult to cure and affects 15 to 20 million people worldwide. (2019-12-19)

Heart transplants from donors positive for hepatitis C
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn., report in this case series on 80 patients who had heart transplants using hearts from donors positive for hepatitis C. (2019-12-18)

Improvements needed for hepatitis C testing in youth
A new study led by Boston Medical Center uncovered a need to improve testing rates for Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) in young people, specifically those with documented substance use history. In the national data sample, under 30 percent of young patients who reported using opioids, methamphetamine, and/or cocaine were tested for HCV. (2019-12-10)

Anti-hepatitis medicine surprises
A new effective treatment of hepatitis C not only combats the virus, but is also effective against potentially fatal complications such as reduced liver functioning and cirrhosis. This is the result of a new study from Aarhus University. (2019-12-05)

Using lungs from increased-risk donors expands donor pool, maintains current survival rates
Cleveland Clinic researchers have found that using lungs from donors who are considered high risk for certain infectious diseases compared to standard risk donors results in similar one-year survival for recipients. In addition, researchers saw no difference in rejection or graft (donor lung) survival after one year in patients receiving lungs from increased-risk donors. (2019-12-05)

Malaria discovery could lead to better HIV and lupus treatments
A discovery about how the immune system responds to malaria infection could lead to better treatments for hepatitis C, HIV and lupus, say Melbourne researchers. The research team showed, in laboratory models, that strong inflammatory signals caused by malaria infection activate molecules that trigger the production of highly potent antibodies to fight the disease. (2019-11-19)

Injection drug use: a new study shows a mixed Canadian portrait
In Canada, 171,900 people injected drugs in 2016, up from 130,000 in 2011. In a study published in the American Journal of Public Health, researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) estimated, using multiplier methods, the number of people who injected drugs in 11 of the 13 Canadian provinces (Nunavut and Northwest Territories not included) and reported a 30-per-cent increase in the period studied. (2019-11-14)

Phage therapy shows promise for alcoholic liver disease
UC San Diego researchers linked a gut bacteria toxin to worse clinical outcomes in patients with alcoholic liver disease, and discovered that treatment with bacteriophages clears the bacteria and eliminates the disease in mice. (2019-11-13)

Phage therapy shows promise for treating alcoholic liver disease
A team of researchers including those from King's College London and the University of California San Diego School of Medicine, have for the first time successfully applied bacteriophage (phage) therapy in mice to alcohol-related liver disease. Phages are viruses that specifically destroy bacteria. (2019-11-13)

For older adults, new hepatitis C treatments are safe and effective
Thankfully, newer treatments known as interferon-free direct-acting antivirals offer a promising approach to addressing hepatitis C. These medications offer cure rates of more than 90 percent in clinical trials and in real life, but they haven't been studied extensively for older adults. A team of researchers studied this issue and published their findings in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The researchers examined how well people older than 65 tolerated interferon-free direct-acting antivirals compared with younger patients. (2019-11-08)

Prevalence of hepatitis C rates in Ohio may indicate highest areas of opioid misuse
The Ohio Alliance for Innovation in Population Health (The Alliance) studied hepatitis C rates within the state and discovered consistently high rates in the southern Appalachia region over a five-year period. (2019-11-07)

On the trail of pathogens in meat, eggs and raw milk
To make food even safer for humans, experts from scientific institutions, food regulatory authorities and the business community will discuss current developments and strategies at the 'Zoonoses and Food Safety' Symposium at the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) on 4 and 5 November 2019, in Berlin-Marienfelde. Because some micro-organisms in food can cause health problems. Campylobacter in raw milk, salmonella in eggs or listeria in ready-to-eat foods often lead to outbreaks affecting numerous patients. (2019-11-06)

New test offers improved diagnosis and management of chronic hepatitis B
A report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, published by Elsevier, describes a new and powerful laboratory tool that may improve the diagnosis and treatment of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The technique can simultaneously assess several indicators important for optimal patient management. (2019-10-10)

Alarming number of heart infections tied to opioid epidemic
As the nationwide opioid epidemic continues, more young people are developing a life-threatening heart infection that can result from drug abuse. It predominantly affects young, white, poor men who also have higher rates of HIV, hepatitis C and alcohol abuse. (2019-09-18)

By comparing needles to mosquitoes, new model offers insights into Hepatitis C solutions
Removing used needles does not reduce the spread of Hepatitis C virus -- instead, changing the ratio of infected to uninfected needles is critical, study finds. (2019-09-04)

Memphis study suggests transplanting Hep C-infected kidneys to uninfected donors safe
Transplantation of kidneys from Hepatitis C-infected donors to uninfected recipients is safe and can be successfully implemented as a standard of care, according to an observational study by physicians at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center and the James D. Eason Transplant Institute at Methodist University Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee. (2019-08-30)

HIV-positive New Yorkers are living longer but still dying from underlying infection, not just from old age
A review of the autopsy reports of 252 men and women who died of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in New York City between 1984 and 2016 reveals several long-term trends in combatting the epidemic. (2019-08-28)

Study proves hepatitis C drugs reduce liver-related deaths by nearly half
A new study from the UT Southwestern Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center demonstrates that antiviral drugs for hepatitis C reduce liver-related deaths by nearly 50% in patients with a history of liver cancer. (2019-08-09)

Hepatitis B: Unusual virus discovered in shrews
The discovery of an unusual hepatitis B virus from shrews offers new opportunities of better understanding the chronic progression of the disease. International research teams were able to demonstrate that an important protein which is essential for the development of a chronic course of infection is not present in this virus. DZIF scientists at the Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin and the University of Giessen are leading the research. (2019-08-02)

The positive and negative role of LRH-1 during inflammation
The research group around Professor Thomas Brunner at the University of Konstanz discovers the role that the LRH-1 protein plays in the immune system -- inhibiting this protein could help treat inflammatory diseases. (2019-07-25)

USPSTF recommends screening for hepatitis B virus infection in pregnant women
The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in pregnant women at their first prenatal visit. The USPSTF routinely makes recommendations about the effectiveness of preventive care services and this statement is a reaffirmation of its 2009 recommendation. (2019-07-23)

Australian bee sting vaccine trial holds promise against allergic reactions
Most people have probably been stung by a bee and while it can be painful, it's especially dangerous for those at risk of suffering a life threatening allergic reaction. Australian researchers have successfully completed a human trial on a vaccine designed to eliminate the risk of a severe allergic reaction to European honeybee stings. (2019-07-16)

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