Current Herbicide News and Events

Current Herbicide News and Events, Herbicide News Articles.
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Variable weather makes weeds harder to whack
From flooded spring fields to summer hailstorms and drought, farmers are well aware the weather is changing. It often means spring planting can't happen on time or has to happen twice to make up for catastrophic losses of young seedlings. According to a joint study between University of Illinois and USDA-ARS, it also means common pre-emergence herbicides are less effective. (2021-02-08)

As the American hemp industry grows, so does our understanding of hemp diseases
As hemp begins to reemerge as an important crop in the United States, scientists are beginning research into the diseases that might prevent the crop from flourishing. A study published in the December issue of Plant Health Progress is one of the first to study the potential disease and disorder limitations for hemp production in the southeastern United States. (2021-01-18)

Impurities boost performance of organic solar cells
An electrochemical method for stabilizing a reactive molecule can help the development of higher efficiency solar cells. (2021-01-05)

Survey shows dicamba may reduce the effectiveness of junglerice controls
A recent survey featured in the journal Weed Technology explores the prevalence of junglerice in cotton and soybean crops and whether dicamba interferes with the effectiveness of herbicides used to control the weed. (2020-12-15)

Male weeds may hold key to their own demise
Scientists are getting closer to finding the genes for maleness in waterhemp and Palmer amaranth, two of the most troublesome agricultural weeds in the US. Finding the genes could enable new 'genetic control' methods for the weeds, which, in many places, no longer respond to herbicides. (2020-12-11)

Ultrasensitive transistor for herbicide detection in water
University of Tokyo researchers have fabricated a tiny electronic sensor that can detect very low levels of a commonly used weed killer in drinking water. (2020-12-01)

Glyphosate may affect human gut microbiota
More than half of bacterial species in the core of the human gut microbiome are potentially sensitive to glyphosate, shows new research. Researchers from the University of Turku Finland, introduced the first bioinformatics resource to determine and test the potential sensitivity of organisms to glyphosate. (2020-11-20)

Hydrogen bonds may be key to airborne dicamba
Research from the lab of Kimberly Parker in the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis has discovered the mechanism that keeps formulations of the herbicide dicamba from going airborne. And they consider why it sometimes fails. (2020-11-04)

Studies explore the role of cover crops in suppressing glyphosate-resistant horseweed
Horseweed is considered one of the most troublesome weeds in the United States and Canada - able to produce devastating losses in both corn and soybean yields when left uncontrolled. Two recent studies - one published by the journal Weed Science and the other by the journal Weed Technology - provide insights on the role cover crops might play in controlling horseweed and reducing the need for herbicides. (2020-10-05)

High throughput screening identifies molecules that reduce cellular stress
A new paper in the journal Science Advances describes the discovery of several promising small molecules that appear to reduce cellular stress in mouse skin cells and could lengthen life. (2020-10-03)

Hitchhiking seeds pose substantial risk of nonnative plant invasions
A team of researchers from the USDA Forest Service, Arkansas State University, and other organizations conducted a study over two seasons at the Port of Savannah, Georgia to inventory nonnative plant seeds that entered the U.S. on refrigerated shipping containers; determine their viability as potential invasive species; and propose strategies for reducing risk to native ecosystems and agricultural commodities. (2020-09-14)

New study on migration success reinforces need for monarch butterfly milkweed habitat
A recently published study presents evidence that the migration success of monarchs hasn't declined in recent years and thus cannot explain the steep decline in the monarch population over the last few decades. The study drew on data collected on 1.4 million monarch butterflies that were tagged in the United States Midwest from 1998 to 2015 and emphasizes the need for new monarch habitat. (2020-09-02)

Genomes published for major agricultural weeds
Representing some of the most troublesome agricultural weeds, waterhemp, smooth pigweed, and Palmer amaranth impact crop production systems across the US and elsewhere with ripple effects felt by economies worldwide. In a landmark study, scientists have published the most comprehensive genome information to date for all three species, marking a new era of scientific discovery toward potential solutions. (2020-08-27)

Findings refute idea of monarchs' migration mortality as major cause of population decline
Research shows that the decline in the monarchs' overwintering numbers is not due to an increase in the deaths of monarchs during the migration. The main determinant of yearly variation in overwintering population size is the size of the summer monarch butterfly population. (2020-08-17)

Herbicide harming marsupial health and development, research finds
Researchers exposed the adult female tammar wallabies to atrazine contaminated water throughout pregnancy, birth and lactation to help establish the extent of harm being caused by the chemical. They then examined the reproductive development of their young by assessing their growth and development to establish that the herbicide is causing major abnormalities in the male reproductive system in many animals. (2020-08-05)

Dozens of pesticides linked with mammary gland tumors in animal studies
In an analysis of how regulators review pesticides for their potential to cause cancer, researchers at Silent Spring Institute identified more than two dozen registered pesticides that were linked with mammary gland tumors in animal studies. The new findings raise concerns about how the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approves pesticides for use and the role of certain pesticides in the development of breast cancer. (2020-08-04)

Unraveling the mystery of wheat herbicide tolerance
Genetically speaking, the loaf of bread you stress-baked during the COVID-19 shutdown is more complex than you think. Wheat's 16 billion genes, organized in not one but three semi-independent genomes, can overlap or substitute for one another, making things extremely tricky for geneticists trying to enhance desirable traits in the world's most widely grown crop. (2020-07-09)

UQ researchers solve a 50-year-old enzyme mystery
Advanced herbicides and treatments for infection may result from the unravelling of a 50-year-old mystery by University of Queensland researchers. (2020-07-09)

GPS isn't just for road trips anymore
Precision agriculture technologies can improve efficiency on smaller farms (2020-07-01)

Weed's wily ways explained in Illinois research
Like antibiotic-resistant bacteria, some herbicide-resistant weeds can't be killed by available chemicals. The problem affects more than just the errant weed in our driveways; herbicide-resistant weeds threaten our food supply, stealing resources and outcompeting the crops that make up our breakfast cereal and feed the nation's livestock. (2020-06-17)

Study documents the challenges of herbicide-resistant annual bluegrass in turf
In an study featured in the journal Weed Science, researchers in Australia examined 31 populations of annual bluegrass suspected to be herbicide resistant. All 31 were found to be resistant to multiple turf herbicides. Three populations had evolved resistance to herbicides with five different mechanisms of action. (2020-06-05)

New study by Clemson scientists could pave way to cure of global parasite
Clemson University scientists have taken another step forward in their quest to find a cure for a notorious parasite that has infected more than 40 million Americans and many times that number around the world. (2020-05-18)

Crops sown in a uniform spatial pattern produce higher yields and reduce environmental impact
Higher yields and fewer weeds are possible if farmers sow wheat, maize, soy and other crops in more uniform spatial patterns, according to University of Copenhagen researchers. More precise sowing can also help reduce herbicide use and fertiliser runoff. (2020-04-28)

The basis of glyphosate resistance in amaranth
This work reveals the unique genomic content and structural organization of an extrachromosomal circular DNA replicon in Amaranth plants, with implications for the advancement of crop breeding and our understanding of the evolution of herbicide resistance. (2020-04-23)

How atrazine regulations have influenced the environment
Opposing chemical trends linked to atrazine regulations from 1990s. (2020-04-22)

Healthy climate news: Fava beans could replace soy
The end of soy as a protein substitute? Researchers at the University of Copenhagen have found a way to make protein powder using fava beans -- a far more climate-friendly alternative. (2020-04-16)

Widely used weed killer harming biodiversity
One of the world's most widely used glyphosate-based herbicides, Roundup, can trigger loss of biodiversity, making ecosystems more vulnerable to pollution and climate change, say researchers from McGill University. (2020-03-02)

Count me out of counting seeds
Technology lends a hand during tedious seed counting process. (2020-02-19)

Modified clay can remove herbicide from water
By creating neatly spaced slits in a clay mineral, University of Groningen Professor of Experimental Solid State Physics Petra Rudolf was able to filter water to remove a toxic herbicide. After removing the pollutant by heating the material, the clay can be reused. Together with colleagues from Greece, Rudolf presents this proof of principle study in the journal Environmental Science Nano. (2020-02-12)

Wasps' gut microbes help them -- and their offspring -- survive pesticides
Exposure to the widely used pesticide atrazine leads to heritable changes in the gut microbiome of wasps, finds a study publishing Feb. 4 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. Additionally, the altered microbiome confers atrazine resistance, which is inherited across successive generations not exposed to the pesticide. (2020-02-04)

Probing the genetic basis of Roundup resistance in morning glory, a noxious weed
The herbicide Roundup is the most widely used agricultural chemical in history. But over the past two decades, a growing number of weed species have evolved resistance to Roundup's active ingredient, glyphosate, reducing the product's dominance somewhat. (2020-02-03)

Harrington Seed Destructor kills nearly 100 percent of US agronomic weed seeds in lab study
In the battle against herbicide-resistant weeds, farmers are increasingly eager to add non-chemical control methods to their management toolbox. Impact mills, which destroy weed seeds picked up by a combine, have been shown to kill 70-99% of weed seeds in soybeans, wheat, and other small-statured cropping systems. And a recent Weed Science study from the University of Illinois shows even seeds that appear unscathed after impact milling don't germinate the following spring. (2020-01-28)

Organic farm advantages in biodiversity and profits depend on location
A large-scale meta-analysis found that organic agriculture sites had 34% more biodiversity and 50% more profits than conventional agriculture sites, even though the organic sites had 18% lower crop yields. The analysis, led by WSU graduate student journal club members, synthesized data from 148 studies around the world spanning 60 different types of crops. (2020-01-27)

Directed evolution of endogenous genes opens door to rapid agronomic trait improvement
A research team led by Profs. GAO Caixia and LI Jiayang from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have engineered five saturated targeted endogenous mutagenesis editors (STEMEs) and generated de novo mutations to facilitate the directed evolution of plant genes. (2020-01-13)

Overuse of herbicides costing UK economy £400 million per year
Scientists from international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) have for the first time put an economic figure on the herbicidal resistance of a major agricultural weed that is decimating winter-wheat farms across the UK. (2019-12-23)

Research validates new control tactic for herbicide-resistant weeds in US soybean crops
In a recent study featured in the journal Weed Science, a team of researchers explored whether impact mills could help US growers fight Palmer amaranth and other herbicide-resistant weeds in soybean crops. (2019-12-19)

Experiment suggests the best ways to tackle invasive Oregon grape in Belgian coastal dunes
Despite being a protected high conservation value habitat, the Atlantic coastal dunes are severely impacted by invasive species. In the Belgian coastal dunes, Oregon grape is one of the worst invaders, so Belgian scientists conducted an experiment to provide recommendations for all affected countries. By publishing their discovery in the open-access journal NeoBiota, the research team aims to boost international collaboration on the development of methods for invasive species control in conservation habitats. (2019-12-12)

Studies show integrated strategies work best for buffelgrass control
Buffelgrass is a drought-tolerant, invasive weed that threatens the biodiversity of native ecosystems in the drylands of the Americas and Australia. Unfortunately, though, land managers trying to control the weed often experience mixed results. (2019-12-11)

Deer and elk can help young Douglas-fir trees under some conditions
Long considered pests by forest managers, deer and elk can help Douglas-fir seedlings thrive under certain vegetation management conditions, a five-year study shows. (2019-12-04)

Research highlights importance of crop competition as a weed control strategy
A new study featured in the journal Weed Science points to the formidable weed control challenges faced by growers today. Weeds have developed resistance to many existing herbicide options, and new herbicide discoveries have plummeted. As a result, nonchemical approaches are growing in importance. (2019-11-04)

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