Current Herbicides News and Events

Current Herbicides News and Events, Herbicides News Articles.
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Scientists of Kemerovo State University have developed a technology for creating in vitro root
Scientists of Kemerovo State University have developed a technology for creating in vitro root cultures with a high content of biologically active substances. (2021-02-16)

Variable weather makes weeds harder to whack
From flooded spring fields to summer hailstorms and drought, farmers are well aware the weather is changing. It often means spring planting can't happen on time or has to happen twice to make up for catastrophic losses of young seedlings. According to a joint study between University of Illinois and USDA-ARS, it also means common pre-emergence herbicides are less effective. (2021-02-08)

Scientists reveal structure of plants' energy generators
Researchers have revealed the first atomic structures of the respiratory apparatus that plants use to generate energy, according to a study published today in eLife. (2021-01-19)

Survey shows dicamba may reduce the effectiveness of junglerice controls
A recent survey featured in the journal Weed Technology explores the prevalence of junglerice in cotton and soybean crops and whether dicamba interferes with the effectiveness of herbicides used to control the weed. (2020-12-15)

Study shows the impact of genetic diversity on effective alligatorweed control
New research featured in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management (IPSM) shows that genetics matter when it comes to the effective control of alligatorweed, an invasive plant found in or near aquatic settings (2020-12-15)

Male weeds may hold key to their own demise
Scientists are getting closer to finding the genes for maleness in waterhemp and Palmer amaranth, two of the most troublesome agricultural weeds in the US. Finding the genes could enable new 'genetic control' methods for the weeds, which, in many places, no longer respond to herbicides. (2020-12-11)

Hydrogen bonds may be key to airborne dicamba
Research from the lab of Kimberly Parker in the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis has discovered the mechanism that keeps formulations of the herbicide dicamba from going airborne. And they consider why it sometimes fails. (2020-11-04)

Studies explore the role of cover crops in suppressing glyphosate-resistant horseweed
Horseweed is considered one of the most troublesome weeds in the United States and Canada - able to produce devastating losses in both corn and soybean yields when left uncontrolled. Two recent studies - one published by the journal Weed Science and the other by the journal Weed Technology - provide insights on the role cover crops might play in controlling horseweed and reducing the need for herbicides. (2020-10-05)

Glyphosate residue in manure fertilizer decrease strawberry and meadow fescue growth
A new study finds that glyphosate residue from herbicides in manure fertilizer decrease the growth of strawberry and meadow fescue as well as runner production of strawberry. (2020-09-18)

Research explores factors influencing soybean injury by synthetic auxin herbicides
Synthetic auxin products have given growers an important option for managing weed populations resistant to glyphosate and other herbicides. But according to an article featured in the journal Weed Technology, there is one important downside to dicamba, 2,4-D and other synthetic auxins. They often move off-target and can cause severe injury to sensitive plants growing nearby. (2020-09-14)

Genomes published for major agricultural weeds
Representing some of the most troublesome agricultural weeds, waterhemp, smooth pigweed, and Palmer amaranth impact crop production systems across the US and elsewhere with ripple effects felt by economies worldwide. In a landmark study, scientists have published the most comprehensive genome information to date for all three species, marking a new era of scientific discovery toward potential solutions. (2020-08-27)

Bacteria can defuse dangerous chemical in Rassaic River
Bacteria that can help defuse highly toxic dioxin in sediments in the Passaic River - a Superfund hazardous waste site - could eventually aid cleanup efforts at other dioxin-contaminated sites around the world, according to Rutgers scientists. Their research, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, needs further work to realize the full potential of the beneficial bottom-dwelling microbes. (2020-08-19)

Unraveling the mystery of wheat herbicide tolerance
Genetically speaking, the loaf of bread you stress-baked during the COVID-19 shutdown is more complex than you think. Wheat's 16 billion genes, organized in not one but three semi-independent genomes, can overlap or substitute for one another, making things extremely tricky for geneticists trying to enhance desirable traits in the world's most widely grown crop. (2020-07-09)

UQ researchers solve a 50-year-old enzyme mystery
Advanced herbicides and treatments for infection may result from the unravelling of a 50-year-old mystery by University of Queensland researchers. (2020-07-09)

Food-grade wheatgrass variety released for public use
Farmers can now grow this superfood with environmental and health benefits. (2020-06-24)

Weed's wily ways explained in Illinois research
Like antibiotic-resistant bacteria, some herbicide-resistant weeds can't be killed by available chemicals. The problem affects more than just the errant weed in our driveways; herbicide-resistant weeds threaten our food supply, stealing resources and outcompeting the crops that make up our breakfast cereal and feed the nation's livestock. (2020-06-17)

Study documents the challenges of herbicide-resistant annual bluegrass in turf
In an study featured in the journal Weed Science, researchers in Australia examined 31 populations of annual bluegrass suspected to be herbicide resistant. All 31 were found to be resistant to multiple turf herbicides. Three populations had evolved resistance to herbicides with five different mechanisms of action. (2020-06-05)

Environmental contaminants alter gut microbiome, health
The microbes that inhabit our bodies are influenced by what we eat, drink, breathe and absorb through our skin, and most of us are chronically exposed to natural and human-made environmental contaminants. In a new paper, scientists from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign review the research linking dozens of environmental chemicals to changes in the gut microbiome and associated health challenges. (2020-05-21)

New study by Clemson scientists could pave way to cure of global parasite
Clemson University scientists have taken another step forward in their quest to find a cure for a notorious parasite that has infected more than 40 million Americans and many times that number around the world. (2020-05-18)

Sensor detects biomarker of early-stage multiple sclerosis
Diagnostic strategy developed by Brazilian researchers can also be used to distinguish MS from neuromyelitis optica, another demyelinating disorder. The two diseases have similar symptoms but must be treated differently. (2020-04-23)

Common soil fungus could be ally in organic corn growers' fight against pests
A common soil fungus might be enlisted as a powerful partner by corn producers to suppress pests and promote plant growth, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest promoting the fungus could be an especially valuable strategy for organic growers who struggle with insect control. (2020-04-23)

How atrazine regulations have influenced the environment
Opposing chemical trends linked to atrazine regulations from 1990s. (2020-04-22)

Better plant edits by enhancing DNA repair
A protein hijacked from a bacterial pathogen helps to facilitate more precise genome editing in plants. (2020-04-07)

CABI scientists help discover new biological control for noxious parthenium weed in Pakistan
CABI scientists, as part of an international team of researchers, have discovered a new biological control in the fight against the highly noxious and invasive weed parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorus) in Pakistan. As outlined in a new paper published in the journal BioInvasions Records, the scientists report the first record of the rust species Puccinia abrupta var. partheniicola -- more commonly known as winter rust -- in the Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Provinces. (2020-03-04)

Illinois study shows universally positive effect of cover crops on soil microbiome
Only a fraction of conventional row crop farmers grow cover crops after harvest, but a new global analysis from the University of Illinois shows the practice can boost soil microbial abundance by 27%. (2020-02-27)

Probing the genetic basis of Roundup resistance in morning glory, a noxious weed
The herbicide Roundup is the most widely used agricultural chemical in history. But over the past two decades, a growing number of weed species have evolved resistance to Roundup's active ingredient, glyphosate, reducing the product's dominance somewhat. (2020-02-03)

Room for complexity? The many players in the coffee agroecosystem
The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences. (2020-01-23)

What's in Puget sound? New technique casts a wide net for concerning chemicals
Using a new 'non-targeted' approach, UW and UW Tacoma researchers screened samples from multiple regions of Puget Sound to look for potentially harmful compounds that might be present. (2020-01-22)

Overuse of herbicides costing UK economy £400 million per year
Scientists from international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London) have for the first time put an economic figure on the herbicidal resistance of a major agricultural weed that is decimating winter-wheat farms across the UK. (2019-12-23)

Studies show integrated strategies work best for buffelgrass control
Buffelgrass is a drought-tolerant, invasive weed that threatens the biodiversity of native ecosystems in the drylands of the Americas and Australia. Unfortunately, though, land managers trying to control the weed often experience mixed results. (2019-12-11)

Deer and elk can help young Douglas-fir trees under some conditions
Long considered pests by forest managers, deer and elk can help Douglas-fir seedlings thrive under certain vegetation management conditions, a five-year study shows. (2019-12-04)

Pesticide management is failing Australian and Great Barrier Reef waterways
Scientists say a failure of Australian management means excessive amounts of harmful chemicals -- many now banned in countries such as the EU, USA and Canada -- are damaging the country's waterways and the Great Barrier Reef. (2019-11-07)

Palm oil: Less fertilizer and no herbicide but same yield?
Environmentally friendlier palm oil production could be achieved with less fertilizer and no herbicide, while maintaining profits. These are the encouraging preliminary results of the first two years of a large-scale oil palm management experiment by an international team of researchers led by the University of Göttingen. The research was published in Frontiers in Forests and Global Change. (2019-11-05)

Unexpected outcomes: Damages to Puerto Rican coffee farms from Hurricane Maria varied
University of Michigan ecologists Ivette Perfecto and John Vandermeer have studied Latin American coffee farms for a quarter century, and they tracked the recovery of tropical forests in Nicaragua following 1988's Hurricane Joan for nearly 20 years. (2019-10-30)

Biologists track the invasion of herbicide-resistant weeds into southwestern Ontario
A team led by biologists from the University of Toronto have identified the ways in which herbicide-resistant strains of the invasive common waterhemp weed have emerged in fields of soy and corn in southwestern Ontario. The resistance, first detected in 2010, spread thanks to two mechanisms: either pollen and seeds of resistant plants were physically dispersed by wind, water and other means, or resistance appeared through the spontaneous emergence of mutations that then spread. (2019-09-30)

Crappy news for the dung beetle and those who depend on them
You mightn't think that the life of a dung beetle, a creature who eats poop every day of its short life, could get any worse, but you'd be wrong. Dung beetles are one of the most threatened terrestrial animal species; and one of the main threats is the excessive use of veterinary medical products that are excreted in dung. (2019-09-24)

Palmer amaranth's molecular secrets reveal troubling potential
Corn, soybean, and cotton farmers shudder at the thought of Palmer amaranth invading their fields. The aggressive cousin of waterhemp - itself a formidable adversary - grows extremely rapidly, produces hundreds of thousands of seeds per plant, and is resistant to multiple classes of herbicides. Pat Tranel from the University of Illinois was the first to discover key mutations in both weed species. Now, in two new studies, he goes farther to explain Palmer's evil genius. (2019-09-16)

Researchers find waterhemp has evolved resistance to 4 herbicide sites of action
When a waterhemp biotype in eastern Nebraska survived a post-emergent application of the PPO inhibitor fomesafen, a team of university scientists decided to take a close look. They discovered the population was resistant to four distinct herbicide sites of action, including PPO inhibitors, ALS inhibitors, EPSPS inhibitors and PS II inhibitors. (2019-09-13)

Could biological clocks in plants set the time for crop spraying?
Plants can tell the time, and this affects their responses to certain herbicides used in agriculture according to new research led by the University of Bristol. The study, in collaboration with Syngenta, found that plant circadian rhythms regulate the sensitivity of plants to a widely used herbicide according to the time of day. The findings could benefit agriculture by reducing crop loss and improving harvests. (2019-08-16)

Analysis and detoxification in one step
Many industrial and agriculture processes use chemicals that can be harmful for workers and the ecosystems where they accumulate. Researchers from Thailand have now developed a bioinspired method to detect and detoxify these chemicals in only one step. As they report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, a combination of two natural enzymatic reactions convert harmful chloro- and nitrophenols into the substance that causes the characteristic glowing of fireflies: luciferin. (2019-08-08)

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