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Current Herbicides News and Events, Herbicides News Articles.
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Fighting a mighty weed
Weeds are pesky in any situation. Now, imagine a weed so troublesome that it has mutated to resist multiple herbicides. Palmer amaranth, a member of the pigweed family, is spreading across states and growing in strength. If farmers and weed scientists cannot find a new solution, crop yields could decline substantially, according to an article in Chemical and Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society.  (2019-08-07)

Newly identified rice gene confers multiple-herbicide resistance
A rice gene that renders the crop resistant to several widely used beta-triketone herbicides has been identified, researchers report, revealing the genetic cause of herbicide susceptibility that has been identified in some important rice varieties. (2019-07-25)

New technique could help engineer polluted water filter, human tissues
Scientists can turn proteins into never-ending patterns that look like flowers, trees or snowflakes, a technique that could help engineer a filter for tainted water and human tissues. Their study, led by researchers at Rutgers University-New Brunswick, appears in the journal Nature Chemistry. (2019-07-24)

Studies show the influence of environment on the evolution of weeds
Rapid increases in herbicide resistance show that weeds can undergo important genetic changes over very brief periods of time. But herbicide use isn't the only factor influencing the evolution of weeds. (2019-07-22)

Scientists hope genetic research will lead to new breakthroughs in weed control
An article featured in the journal Weed Science sheds important new light on the genetics and potential control of Palmer amaranth and waterhemp - two troublesome Amaranthus species weeds that are resistant to multiple herbicides. (2019-07-18)

Illinois study advances possibility of genetic control for major agricultural weeds
Waterhemp and Palmer amaranth, two aggressive weeds that threaten the food supply in North America, are increasingly hard to kill with commercially available herbicides. A novel approach known as genetic control could one day reduce the need for these chemicals. Now, scientists are one step closer. (2019-07-17)

Directed evolution comes to plants
Accelerating plant evolution with CRISPR paves the way for breeders to engineer new crop varieties. (2019-06-19)

Research shows temperature, glyphosate increase probability for dicamba volatility
New research from the UT Institute of Agriculture suggests spraying dicamba in warm temperatures and adding glyphosate to a dicamba spray mixture could increase dicamba volatility, potentially leading to increased off-target movement and damage to non-tolerant plants. (2019-06-13)

Superweed resists another class of herbicides, study finds
We've all heard about bacteria that are becoming resistant to multiple types of antibiotics. These are the so-called superbugs perplexing and panicking medical science. The plant analogue may just be waterhemp, a broadleaf weed common to corn and soybean fields across the Midwest. With resistance to multiple common herbicides, waterhemp is getting much harder to kill. (2019-06-11)

New insights on the control of dicamba-resistant kochia are featured by Weed Technology
Kochia is a highly invasive weed that is common in the Great Plains, where it has developed resistance to multiple herbicides. Now new dicamba-resistant strains are adding to grower worries. (2019-05-15)

Study shows native plants regenerate on their own after invasive shrubs are removed
Invasive shrubs have become increasingly prevalent in the deciduous forests of eastern North America -- often creating a dense understory that outcompetes native plants. Many land managers would like to remove the invaders, but worry about whether a costly remediation program will be needed to help the native plant community rebound. (2019-05-10)

Research spotlights the role of cover crops in slowing herbicide resistance
An article in the most recent edition of the journal Weed Science shows that cover crops can play an important role in slowing the development of herbicide-resistant weeds. (2019-05-10)

CRISPRed wheat helps farmers control weeds
Recently, a research team led by Profs. GAO Caixia and LI Jiayang at the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (IGDB, CAS), together with Associate Prof. JIANG Linjian at China Agricultural University (CAU), generated several herbicide-tolerant wheat germplasms using base editing to facilitate weed control in wheat fields. (2019-04-15)

Banned pesticides in Europe's rivers
Tests of Europe's rivers and canals have revealed more than 100 pesticides -- including 24 that are not licensed for use in the EU. (2019-04-08)

The growth of a wheat weed can be predicted to reduce the use of herbicides
The study focuses on wild oats and is based on precision agriculture as well as the use of multispectral images. (2019-03-25)

Natural plant defense genes provide clues to safener protection in grain sorghum
Weeds often emerge at the same time as vulnerable crop seedlings and sneak between plants as crops grow. How do farmers kill them without harming the crops themselves? In a new University of Illinois study, researchers identify genes and metabolic pathways responsible for safener efficacy in grain sorghum. (2019-03-21)

Scientists warn about the dangerous interaction of plant protection products
A recent study by researchers at the Estonian University of Life Sciences, Ghend, and Cardiff University found that the toxins used in agriculture to combat insect pests and fungi can be more dangerous than expected. (2019-03-12)

Toxic byproducts of Agent Orange continue to pollute Vietnam environment, study says
During the Vietnam War, United States aircraft sprayed more than 20 million gallons of herbicides, including dioxin-contaminated Agent Orange, on the country's rain forests, wetlands, and croplands. A new article from the University of Illinois and Iowa State University documents the environmental legacy of Agent Orange in Vietnam, including hotspots where dioxin continues to enter the food supply. (2019-02-27)

UW study: Exposure to chemical in Roundup increases risk for cancer
Exposure to glyphosate -- the world's most widely used, broad-spectrum herbicide and the primary ingredient in the weedkiller Roundup -- increases the risk of some cancers by more than 40 percent, according to new research from the University of Washington. (2019-02-13)

Scientists to create new 'chemical noses' to rid the environment of industrial pollutants
Scientists from five European countries have joined forces to develop next-generation 'chemical noses' to remove industrial pollutants from the environment. The European Commission allocated 2.9 million euros to finance the Horizon 2020 FET-OPEN project INITIO that will bring together researchers from TalTech and five other universities as well as experts from an Interspectrum OÜ operating in Estonia and an Italian company in an international research project. (2019-02-06)

High pesticide exposure among farmers linked to poor sense of smell later
A Michigan State University study is the first to show an association between unusually high pesticide exposure and poor sense of smell among aging farmers. (2019-01-16)

Climate change imperils Midwest ag production
A new Cornell University-led study shows that Midwest agriculture is increasingly vulnerable to climate change because of the region's reliance on growing rain-fed crops. (2018-12-12)

Yale chemists find a new tool for understanding enzymes -- Google
In a new study published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, chemistry professor Victor Batista and his colleagues used the Google algorithm PageRank to identify key amino acids in the regulation of a bacterial enzyme essential for most microorganisms. (2018-12-11)

Study explains waterhemp's metabolic resistance to topramezone
Corn naturally tolerates certain herbicides, detoxifying the chemicals before they can cause harm. It's what allows farmers to spray fields with the class of herbicides known as HPPD-inhibitors, which kill weeds such as waterhemp and Palmer amaranth and leave corn unscathed. But in more and more fields, the method is failing; waterhemp isn't dying. (2018-11-27)

Scientists find italian ryegrass is resistant to multiple herbicides
A team of scientists set out to determine if the paraquat-resistant population might also be resistant to other postemergence herbicides. Seven other herbicides commonly used in fruit tree and nut tree crops were included in the study, including clethodim, fluazifop-P-butyl, glufosinate, glyphosate, pyroxsulam, rimsulfuron and sethoxydim. (2018-11-23)

Recent study documents damage to rice crops by three fall-applied residual herbicides
Fall-applied residual herbicides are a commonly used control for glyphosate-resistant Italian ryegrass -- one of the most troublesome weeds in Mid-South row crops. But research published in the journal Weed Technology shows rice growers need to be cautious. Some residual herbicides can have a negative impact on rice crop performance. (2018-11-15)

Vietnam veterans and agent orange exposure -- new report
The latest in a series of congressionally mandated biennial reviews of the evidence of health problems that may be linked to exposure to Agent Orange and other herbicides used during the Vietnam War found sufficient evidence of an association for hypertension and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). The committee that carried out the study and wrote the report, Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 11 (2018), focused on the scientific literature published between Sept. 30, 2014, and Dec. 31, 2017. (2018-11-15)

Planetary boundaries for antibiotic and pesticide resistance identified
Researchers have now published the first estimates of antibiotic and pesticide 'planetary boundaries' in the journal Nature Sustainability. The researchers suggest that if resistance to antibiotics and pesticides goes beyond these boundaries, societies risk large-scale health and agricultural crises. The results indicate one group of bacteria has passed a boundary. (2018-11-12)

Quantifying evolutionary impacts of humans on the biosphere is harder than it seems
Are human disturbances to the environment driving evolutionary changes in animals and plants? A new study conducted by McGill researchers finds that, on average, human disturbances don't appear to accelerate the process of natural selection. While the finding may seem reassuring, this unexpected pattern could reflect the limited number of species for which data were available. (2018-10-12)

Common herbicide compound may save millions of lives
A chemical compound found in common herbicides could help fight hospital-acquired human fungal pathogenic infections, which claim an estimated two million lives per year. A team of international researchers led by The University of Queensland has discovered that the chemical chlorimuron ethyl also targets a range of fungal infections that are potentially fatal to humans, particularly people undergoing treatments which place the immune system under stress. (2018-10-03)

Common weed killer linked to bee deaths
Honey bees exposed to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, lose some of the beneficial bacteria in their guts and are more susceptible to infection and death from harmful bacteria. Scientists believe this is evidence that glyphosate might be contributing to the decline of honey bees and native bees around the world. (2018-09-24)

Researchers confirm glyphosate resistance in junglerice
There has been a lot of publicity in recent years about growers battling glyphosate-resistant pigweed in soybean and cotton crops. But pigweed isn't the only weed resistant to glyphosate. New research published in the journal Weed Science shows certain populations of junglerice (Echinochloa colona) are now among a growing number of weeds resistant to the herbicide. (2018-09-18)

How plants harness microbes to get nutrients
A Rutgers-led team has discovered how plants harness microbes in soil to get nutrients, a process that could be exploited to boost crop growth, fight weeds and slash the use of polluting fertilizers and herbicides. (2018-09-17)

Engineered sand zaps storm water pollutants
University of California, Berkeley, engineers have created a new way to remove contaminants from storm water, potentially addressing the needs of water-stressed communities that are searching for ways to tap the abundant and yet underused source of fresh drinking water. The mineral-coated sand reacts with and destroys organic pollutants, providing a way to help purify storm water percolating into underground aquifers, creating a safe and local reservoir of drinking water for parched communities. (2018-08-30)

Researchers recommend new herbicide registration for weed control in watermelon crops
Research featured in the latest edition of the journal Weed Technology recommends that the herbicide bicyclopyrone, now used in corn, be registered for weed management in watermelon crops as well. (2018-08-29)

Researchers discover natural product that could lead to new class of commercial herbicide
A team of UCLA engineers and scientists discovered a new and potentially highly effective type of weed killer. This finding could lead to the first new class of commercial herbicides in more than 30 years, an important outcome as weeds continue to develop resistance to current herbicide regimens. (2018-07-13)

Try togetherness: Study promotes cooperative weed management to curb herbicide resistance
In the fight against herbicide resistance, farmers are working with a shrinking toolkit. Waterhemp, a weedy nemesis of corn and soybean farmers, has developed resistance to multiple herbicide modes of action, often in the same plant. Even farmers using the latest recommendations for tank mixtures are fighting an uphill battle, with long-distance movement of pollen and seeds bringing the potential for new types of resistance into their fields each year. (2018-06-04)

Engineered cotton uses weed-suppression chemical as nutrient
A newly developed fertilizer system will provide nutrition to engineered cotton crops worldwide and a deadly dose to weeds that are increasingly herbicide resistant, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Research study. The new system applies phosphite to cotton crops engineered to express a certain gene -- a gene that makes cotton able to process the phosphite into nutrition while the same compound suppresses weeds that are unable to use it, researchers said. (2018-06-04)

Are humans causing cancer in wild animals?
As humans, we know that some of our activities can cause cancer to develop in our bodies. Smoking, poor diets, pollution, chemicals used as additives in food and personal hygiene products, and even too much sun can contribute to an increased risk of cancer. But, are human activities also causing cancer in wild animals? Researchers from ASU's School of Life Sciences think so and are urgently calling for research into this topic. (2018-05-21)

What happens if we run out?
What happens when pests resist all forms of herbicides and pesticides? To slow the evolutionary progression of weeds and insect pests gaining resistance to herbicides and pesticides, policymakers should provide resources for large-scale, landscape-level studies of a number of promising but untested approaches for slowing pest evolution. (2018-05-17)

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