Current Herceptin News and Events

Current Herceptin News and Events, Herceptin News Articles.
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Novel therapy-resistance mechanism promoting the growth of breast cancer brain metastasis
SORLA is a protein trafficking receptor that has been mainly studied in neurons, but it also plays a role in cancer cells. Professor Johanna Ivaska's research group at Turku Bioscience observed that SORLA functionally contributes to the most reported therapy-resistant mechanism by which the cell-surface receptor HER3 counteracts HER2 targeting therapy in HER2-positive cancers. Removing SORLA from cancer cells sensitized anti-HER2 resistant breast cancer brain metastasis to targeted therapy. (2021-01-29)

First report card on biosimilars in oncology
In a Policy Review in The Lancet Oncology, Y. Tony Yang, a professor at the George Washington University School of Nursing and Milken Institute School of Public Health, along with his co-authors, identify factors preventing the effective launch of oncology biosimilars in the United States, including the struggle to garner market share and fighting patent litigation lawsuits across the country. (2020-12-01)

New therapy targets breast cancer metastases in brain
When breast cancer spreads to the brain, the prognosis is grim. Patients only have about six months to live. Women with HER2-positive breast cancer tend to develop brain metastases in up to 55% of cases. Chemotherapy drugs targeting breast cancer cells in the brain aren't effective, because they can't cross the blood-brain-barrier. But a new combination therapy targeting breast cancer tumors in the brain dramatically decreased tumor size and increased survival in a preclinical study. (2020-08-26)

New affinity purification technique for therapeutic proteins
Professor Kimoon Kim's research group at POSTECH has developed a highly pure and efficient technique for purifying antiviral and anti-cancer protein therapeutics using molecular affinity interaction. (2020-07-27)

New method accelerates development of protein therapeutics
Northwestern Engineering researchers have developed a quick, cell-free system to create biosynthetic pathways to build and study sugar structures. (2019-11-27)

Two-in-one drug combining Herceptin with chemotherapy keeps women's breast cancers at bay
Guiding chemotherapy to a tumor by attaching it to the antibody-based target drug Herceptin (trastuzumab) is effective at treating women with breast cancer who have no other treatment options, a new clinical trial shows. The two-in-one treatment kept breast cancer at bay in women with a type of the disease called HER2-positive breast cancer who had stopped responding to existing drugs. (2019-06-27)

Researchers identified novel oncogenic function for receptor linked to Alzheimer's disease
Common and rare SORLA single nucleotide polymorphisms have been associated with the development of Alzheimer's disease. So far, SORLA has been mainly studied in neurons, but the new study focused on SORLA's role in cancer cells. Led by Academy Professor Johanna Ivaska, researchers from the University of Turku in Finland observed that SORLA was highly expressed in HER2 positive cancers. Removing SORLA from cancer cells severely impaired the oncogenic fitness of HER2 positive cancers. (2019-05-28)

Synthetic biology used to target cancer cells while sparing healthy tissue, study reports
Synthetic proteins engineered to recognize overly active biological pathways can kill cancer cells while sparing their healthy peers, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2019-05-02)

Surgery associated with increased survival for patients with HER2+ stage 4 breast cancer
Surgery was associated with higher survival rates for patients with HER2-positive (HER2+) stage 4 breast cancer compared with those who did not undergo surgery, according to results presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3. (2019-04-02)

Breast cancer cells shifted into HER2 positive status with bold new strategy
One of the most effective breast cancer drugs, Herceptin, is only available to people whose tumors test HER2-positive. That's only one in five breast cancer patients. That could change with a new approach from Scripps Research. (2019-02-07)

Hens that lay human proteins in eggs offer future therapy hope
Chickens that are genetically modified to produce human proteins in their eggs can offer a cost-effective method of producing certain types of drugs, research from the University of Edinburgh suggests. Researchers say the findings provide sound evidence for using chickens as a cheap method of producing high quality drugs for use in research studies and, potentially one day, in patients. (2019-01-27)

Combined approach offers hope to lung cancer patients who become resistant to drugs
Three drugs together block growth from without and within. (2018-07-25)

A change in bacteria's genetic code holds promise of longer-lasting drugs
By altering the genetic code in bacteria, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have demonstrated a method to make therapeutic proteins more stable, an advance that would improve the drugs' effectiveness and convenience, leading to smaller and less frequent doses of medicine, lower health care costs and fewer side effects for patients with cancer and other diseases. (2018-06-04)

Three-in-one molecule shows promise in helping certain breast cancer patients
A newly designed three-part molecule could be the one answer patients with a certain form of breast cancer are looking for, scientists report. This chimera, created by a team at the Georgia Cancer Center, has the ability to simultaneously decrease the expression of three growth factors that are over-expressed in some cancers. (2018-03-22)

Fewer breast cancer patients need radical surgery if they are pre-treated with targeted drugs
Extensive surgery involving mastectomy and removal of several lymph nodes can be safely avoided for more women with some types of breast cancer, if they receive targeted drugs before surgery, according to research presented at the 11th European Breast Cancer Conference. (2018-03-22)

Study: Two drugs prevent heart problems in breast cancer patients
Data presented from a Late-Breaking Clinical Trial at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session Data demonstrated the effectiveness of beta blockers or ACE inhibitors to reduce the risk of cardio toxicity for HER2-positive breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy (2018-03-11)

Popular heart medications can prevent herceptin-induced heart issues in some patients
Breast cancer patients who started taking one of two well-known heart medications at the same time they initiated trastuzumab -- a targeted cancer therapy that has been linked to heart damage -- received no benefit in terms of preventing declines in heart function, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session. (2018-03-11)

Scientists discover rogue messengers that hinder body's immune response to cancer
Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have made a discovery around treatment-resistant breast cancer that may turn the phrase, 'don't shoot the messenger', on its head. The scientists have found that cell to cell messengers released by cancer cells which are not responding to treatment, can negatively affect the body's immune system response against the cancer. They have also discovered a possible way for doctors to identify those patients most at risk of treatment resistance. (2017-09-27)

Targeting 'Achilles' heel' could supercharge breast cancer treatment
A new class of anti-cancer agents targeting cancer cells' 'Achilles' heel' could help to supercharge breast cancer treatment, improving outcomes for the most aggressive types of breast cancer. Combining anti-cancer compound S63845 with currently used cancer drugs was more effective in killing triple negative breast cancers and HER2-positive breast cancers. This is the first time the S63845 compound has been shown to be effective in breast cancer, suggesting it should be investigated in clinical trials. (2017-08-02)

Shorter herceptin breast cancer treatment may produce better results
Breast cancer patients who receive the drug Herceptin for nine weeks as part of their post-surgery chemotherapy regime may enjoy better health outcomes, according to new research led by UCL, compared to those who receive it for 12 months, the period currently recommended in the English National Health Service. (2017-03-01)

Researchers identify biomarkers of response to treatment in invasive breast cancer
Researchers report at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium that they have identified biomarkers they believe can be used as part of a larger model to predict how patients with HER2-positive operative breast cancer will respond to the targeted treatment trastuzumab, commercially known as Herceptin, and chemotherapy. (2016-12-08)

Brain metastasis persists despite improved targeted treatment for HER2 breast cancer
While new targeted treatments developed across the past two decades have led to dramatic survival improvements for women with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers and collaborators report that rates of breast cancer brain metastasis for women with this disease have not substantially declined. (2016-12-07)

Drugs prevent heart damage during breast cancer treatment, study show
Clinical trial shows heart medications prevent damage during chemotherapy for patients with breast cancer. (2016-11-29)

Updated testing guidelines make more women eligible for herceptin, yet benefit uncertain
Changes to HER2 testing guidelines for breast cancer in 2013 significantly increased the number of patients who test HER2-positive, according to a new study by Mayo Clinic researchers published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. Cancers that have an excess of HER2 protein or extra copies of the HER2 gene are called HER2-positive and can be treated with drugs like Herceptin that target HER2. HER2 stands for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2. (2016-07-27)

Penn preclinical study outlines cardiovascular side effects of breast cancer drug
A receptor protein that is the target of the breast cancer drug trastuzumab (Herceptin) is needed for proper heart blood-vessel development. These discoveries have implications for better understanding the cardiovascular side effects of trastuzumab commonly used for cancer and provide an example of integration at the molecular level of pathways involved in tissue growth and blood-vessel patterning. (2016-07-13)

Prolonged breath holds of over five minutes could help in targeted radiotherapy
Researchers have successfully shown for the first time that breast cancer patients can be trained to achieve single prolonged breath holds of over five minutes, opening the door for targeted radiotherapy to be administered with just one dose in each daily session. (2016-05-11)

Older women, especially blacks, receive targeted breast cancer treatment at low rates
The advent of targeted drugs for a specific type of breast cancer -- HER2 positive -- has dramatically improved survival rates for women with the disease. But a study led by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center reveals low rates of use of a targeted drug among older women with early-stage breast cancer of this type, and even lower rates for older black women. (2016-04-12)

Does ethnicity affect breast cancer biology?
Although breast cancer is somewhat more aggressive in South Asian and Black women than in White women, this is largely due to age differences between ethnic groups in the UK, according to new research presented at the 10th European Breast Cancer Conference (EBCC10). The findings suggest that inherent differences in tumor biology between the ethnic groups are unlikely to play a role. (2016-03-10)

Drugs prevent heart damage during breast cancer treatment, study shows
Clinical trial shows heart medications prevent damage during chemotherapy for patients with breast cancer. (2015-12-09)

New insights into protein structure could change the future of biomedicine
Researchers at the University of Waterloo have discovered a new way to create designer proteins that have the potential to transform biotechnology and personalized medicines. In a range of experiments Professor Elizabeth Meiering, in collaboration with colleagues from India and the United States, created a protein that can withstand a range of physiological and environmental conditions -- a problem that has challenged chemists looking to create super stable, highly functional proteins. (2015-11-24)

Rare Her2 mutations may not always spur breast cancers on their own
Results of a new laboratory study by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers suggests that some rare 'missense' mutations in the HER2 gene are apparently not -- on their own -- capable of causing breast cancer growth or spread. (2015-11-10)

Study shows association between breastfeeding and reduced risk of aggressive breast cancer
A large international study shows that breastfeeding is associated with a lower risk of developing an aggressive form of breast cancer called hormone-receptor negative. (2015-10-27)

Two-hit therapy for breast tumors using approved drugs looks promising in animal study
Disabling a cancer-causing pathway and administering an immune-molecule-based mop-up therapy eradicated a specific type of breast tumor in mice. (2015-10-07)

Molecular 'feedback loop' may explain tamoxifen resistance in patients with breast cancer
For reasons unknown, many patients with breast cancer treated with the estrogen receptor-blocking drug tamoxifen eventually become resistant to the treatment despite the fact that their cancer cells still have the estrogen receptor proteins that the drug normally targets. Now, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists and their colleagues have traced out an intricate molecular pathway in those cells they say may explain, at least in part, how tamoxifen resistance develops. (2015-09-23)

Mayo Clinic-led research team identifies master switch for cancer-causing HER2 protein
Herceptin has been touted as a wonder drug for women with HER2-positive breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease that is fueled by excess production of the HER2 protein. However, not all of these patients respond to the drug, and many who do respond eventually acquire resistance. (2015-04-27)

New signaling pathway discovered in HER2-positive breast cancer, and 2 powerful drug targets
A team at CSHL has published results of experiments that lay bare a previously unknown pathway activated in a highly lethal form of breast cancer. The pathway, they discovered, contains at least two potentially powerful drug targets, according to the team leader. The breast cancer type is called HER2-positive, and affects about one cancer patient in four. (2015-04-20)

Cow immune system inspires potential new therapies
To help people with hormone deficiencies, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have developed a potential new therapy based on an unlikely model: immune molecules from cows. Their research shows that human hormones and antibodies can be fused together -- mimicking long, stalk-like cow antibodies. (2015-02-06)

New molecule protects heart from toxic breast cancer drugs
A new molecule has been found that protects the heart from toxic breast cancer drugs and also kills the cancerous tumor. The research from Italy addresses the burgeoning problem of heart disease in cancer survivors and is announced by the European Society of Cardiology today on World Cancer Day. (2015-02-03)

Combined therapy can reduce chance of recurrence in women with small, HER2+ breast tumors
Dana-Farber researchers report women with small, HER2-positive breast tumors who received a combination of lower-intensity chemotherapy and a targeted drug following surgery were highly unlikely to have the cancer recur within three years. (2015-01-07)

Herceptin found to improve long-term survival of HER2-positive breast cancer patients
VCU Massey Cancer Center physician-researcher Charles E. Geyer, Jr., M.D., was the National Protocol Officer for one component of a large national study involving two National Cancer Institute-supported clinical trials that demonstrated that trastuzumab significantly improves the long-term survival of HER-2 positive breast cancer patients. (2014-12-15)

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