Current Herpes News and Events

Current Herpes News and Events, Herpes News Articles.
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Cold sores: Discovery reveals how stress, illness and even sunburn trigger flareups
The finding could lead to new ways to prevent cold sores and herpes-related eye disease from reoccurring, the researchers report. (2021-02-11)

BU study: New vaginal film, MB66, is safe
Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Mapp Biopharmaceutical have now found that MB66, a vaginal film product containing monoclonal antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) and herpes simplex viruses types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and 2), is safe and effective. (2021-02-03)

T cells linked to myelin implicated in MS-like disease in monkeys
Scientists have uncovered new clues implicating a type of herpes virus as the cause of a central nervous system disease in monkeys that's similar to multiple sclerosis in people. By linking two specific T cells to the loss of myelin, scientists say the new study opens the possibility of developing an antiviral therapy that could be especially useful for newly diagnosed cases of multiple sclerosis. (2021-01-15)

Development of a new method for decoding viral genes
A research team led by Professor Yasushi Kawaguchi of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo, developed a new decoding method for viral genes that can easily and quickly obtain even non-canonical genetic information. Using this new decoding method, they identified nine novel proteins encoded by herpes simplex virus type 1(HSV-1) and found that one of them, piUL49, is a pathogenic factor that specifically controls the onset of herpes encephalitis . (2020-12-07)

Drug for rare disorder shows promise for treating herpes viruses
New research shows that the antiviral activity of the drug -- called phenylbutyrate, or PBA -- was even better when used along with acyclovir, a common HSV-1 treatment. When used in combination, less acyclovir is needed to effectively suppress the virus compared to acyclovir alone -- this is important because acyclovir is also known to have toxic side effects in the kidneys. (2020-12-07)

RUDN immunologists developed method for assessing inflammation in respiratory tract diseases
A team of immunologists from RUDN University suggested a new tool to control inflammation levels in asthma patients with accompanying diseases. To obtain information about disease flow and risks of complications, they used different types of cytokines found in the patients' nasal swabs. (2020-12-05)

RUDN University medics created a wound-healing gel with metabolic products of trichoderma
Researchers from the Department of Biochemistry of RUDN University developed a wound-healing gel based on a substance that is produced by Trichoderma fungi. (2020-12-04)

Coinfection: more than the sum of its parts
Infections with two pathogens pose a serious threat in the clinics. Researchers from Würzburg and Jena have developed a technique that provides new insights into this process and can be used as an early warning system. (2020-11-18)

Vaccine shows promise against herpes virus
A genetically edited form of a herpes simplex virus has outperformed a leading vaccine candidate in a new study published in Nature Vaccines. When challenged with a virulent strain of the sexually transmitted HSV-2, vaccinated guinea pigs displayed fewer genital lesions, less viral replication and less of the viral shedding that most readily spreads infection. (2020-11-06)

Cornea appears to resist infection from novel coronavirus
Some doctors have worried that the novel coronavirus may be able to infect people by getting into their eyes. Viruses such as herpes simplex can infect the eye's cornea and Zika virus has been found in corneal tissue and tears, but new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests the cornea can resist infection from SARS-CoV-2. (2020-11-03)

How herpes infection may impair human fetal brain development
Three cell-based models shed light on how herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection, which can spread to the fetal brain during pregnancy, may contribute to various neurodevelopmental disabilities and long-term neurological problems into adulthood, according to a study published October 22, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Pu Chen and Ying Wu of Wuhan University, and colleagues. (2020-10-22)

First reported UK case of sudden permanent hearing loss linked to COVID-19
Although uncommon, sudden permanent hearing loss seems to be linked to COVID-19 infection in some people, warn doctors, reporting the first UK case in the journal BMJ Case Reports. (2020-10-13)

Researchers identify key role of immune cells in brain infection
Researchers at the University of Liverpool have identified the specific type of immune cell that induces brain inflammation in herpes simplex virus (HSV) encephalitis. Crucially, they have also determined the signalling protein that calls this immune cell into the brain from the bloodstream. The findings, published in Cell Reports, could aid the development of targeted treatments for the brain infection, which is the most common cause of viral encephalitis worldwide. (2020-09-15)

Faulty brain circuits arise from abnormal fusion
University of Queensland (UQ) researchers have found that when nematode worms were engineered to express the molecules fusogens in their neurons, these nerve cells fused together, causing behavioural impairments. This has impications for understanding neurological diseases. (2020-08-24)

New gene therapy approach eliminates at least 90% latent herpes simplex virus 1
Infectious disease researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center have used a gene editing approach to remove latent herpes simplex virus 1, or HSV-1, also known as oral herpes. In animal models, the findings show at least a 90 percent decrease in the latent virus, enough researchers expect that it will keep the infection from coming back. (2020-08-18)

SFU chemist's new process fast-tracks drug treatments for viral infections and cancer
Discovering antiviral and anticancer drugs will soon be faster and cheaper thanks to new research from Simon Fraser University chemist Robert Britton and his international team. (2020-08-07)

Penis microbiota predicts if a man's female partner will develop bacterial vaginosis
Penile microbiome composition can vary; however, the presence of some bacterial vaginosis-related bacteria correlates with bacterial vaginosis onset in their female partners. Results highlight 10 bacteria that could be used to accurately predict bacterial vaginosis incidence in women. The study suggests that treatment manipulating the penile microbiome may reduce BV incidence in sex partners. (2020-08-04)

Antiviral method against herpes paves the way for combatting incurable viral infections
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered a new method to treat human herpes viruses. The new broad-spectrum method targets physical properties in the genome of the virus rather than viral proteins, which have previously been targeted. The treatment consists of new molecules that penetrate the protein shell of the virus and prevent genes from leaving the virus to infect the cell. It does not lead to resistance and acts independently of mutations in the genome of the virus. (2020-07-24)

Oral herpes rates are falling in children
Fewer people are being exposed to herpes simplex type 1 - also known as oral herpes - in their childhood and the prevalence amongst the population in Europe is falling by 1% per year, suggests research published in the journal BMJ Global Health. (2020-07-16)

Fewer complications after organ transplantation
A large international study coordinated by University Hospital Regensburg and Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin has demonstrated the safety of new cell therapy approaches for use in kidney transplant recipients. Transplant recipients were shown to require lower levels of immunosuppression in order to prevent organ rejection. This reduces the risk of side effects such as viral infections. Results from this study have been published in The Lancet.* (2020-06-10)

Researchers may have uncovered the Achilles heel of viruses
A new research study headed by the Department of Biomedicine at Aarhus University, Denmark, identifies how viruses avoid the body's immune system and cause infections and diseases. The new knowledge could pave the way for the treatment of viral diseases such as COVID-19. (2020-05-20)

How herpes simplex virus can evade the immune response to infect the brain
A research team has discovered a molecular mechanism that helps Herpes simplex virus (HSV1) evade the innate immune system and infect the brain causing a rare disease with high mortality. The study from Aarhus University, University of Oxford, and University of Gothenburg, led by first author Chiranjeevi Bodda in Søren Paludan's lab, will be published May 8 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM). (2020-05-08)

Herpes virus decoded
The genome of the herpes simplex virus 1 was decoded using new methods. Hundreds of previously unknown gene products were found. The virus causes lip herpes, but can also be life-threatening. (2020-04-27)

Novel technology aims to improve treatment of neurological diseases
Researchers at Princeton University are developing new ''gene promoters'' - which act like switches to turn genes on - for use with gene therapy, the delivery of new genes to replace ones that are faulty. The new promoters work especially well for brain and other neurological disorders and provide longer-lasting functionality compared to other promoters. (2020-04-17)

Ion channel VRAC enhances immune response against viruses
VRAC/LRRC8 chloride channels do not only play a decisive role in the transport of cytostatics, amino acids and neurotransmitters. They can also transport the important messenger substance cGAMP from cell to cell and thus strengthen the immune response to infections with DNA viruses. Since cGAMP is always formed when cells detect DNA outside their nucleus, the discovery is potentially of great importance also for other pathologies such as cancer. (2020-04-10)

Curcumin is the spice of life when delivered via tiny nanoparticles
For years, curry lovers have sworn by the anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric, but its active compound, curcumin, has long frustrated scientists hoping to validate these claims with clinical studies. (2020-03-05)

Mayo Clinic researchers clarify how cells defend themselves from viruses
A protein known to help cells defend against infection also regulates the form and function of mitochondria, according to a new paper in Nature Communications. The protein, one of a group called myxovirus-resistance (Mx) proteins, help cells fight infections without the use of systemic antibodies or white blood cells. (2020-03-03)

Sweet nanoparticles trick kidney
Researchers engineer tiny particles with sugar molecules to prevent side effect in cancer therapy. (2020-02-04)

Unique new antiviral treatment made using sugar
New antiviral materials made from sugar have been developed to destroy viruses on contact and may help in the fight against viral outbreaks. This new development from a collaborative team of international scientists shows promise for the treatment of herpes simplex (cold sore virus), respiratory syncytial virus, hepatitis C, HIV, and Zika virus to name a few. The team have demonstrated success treating a range of viruses in the lab - including respiratory infections to genital herpes. (2020-01-29)

Adult exposure to chickenpox linked to lower risk of shingles, but does not provide full protection
Adults who are exposed to a child with chickenpox (varicella) in the home are around 30% less likely to develop shingles (herpes zoster) over 20 years, finds a study in The BMJ today. (2020-01-22)

Herpes simplex viruses: new relationships between epidemiology and history
An Italian research team has refined the history and origins of two extremely common pathogens in human populations, herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2. Using and applying rather precise data methods they estimated that the circulating strains of herpes simplex virus type 1 migrated from Africa about 5000 years ago. The exit from Africa of herpes simplex virus type 2 was even more recent and probably occurred in the eighteenth century, during the height of the slave trade. (2020-01-13)

Are herpes virus infections linked to Alzheimer's disease?
Researchers refute the link between increased levels of herpes virus and Alzheimer's disease. (2019-12-18)

Herpes's Achilles heel
Scientists have used the gene-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 to disrupt both latent reservoirs of the herpes simplex virus and actively replicating virus in human fibroblast cells. Experiments pinpoint weak spot that can make the virus susceptible to gene editing. (2019-12-12)

MS linked to variant of common herpes virus through new method
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have developed a new method to separate between two different types of a common herpes virus (HHV-6) that has been linked to multiple sclerosis. By analyzing antibodies in the blood against the most divergent proteins of herpesvirus 6A and 6B, the researchers were able to show that MS-patients carry the herpesvirus 6A to a greater extent than healthy individuals. (2019-11-26)

Discovery reveals mechanism that turns herpes virus on and off
New research from Dr. Luis M. Schang and his group at the Baker Institute for Animal Health has identified a new mechanism that plays a role in controlling how the herpes virus alternates between dormant and active stages of infection. (2019-11-14)

Study finds inflammatory protein can protect against spread of herpes virus
UA College of Medicine - Phoenix researchers discover protein function that can improve current therapeutics. (2019-10-28)

Fighting the herpes virus
New insights into preventing herpes infections have been published in Nature Communications. Researchers from the Berlin Institute for Medical Systems Biology (BIMSB) at the MDC used single-cell RNA sequencing to better understand the viral infections.sequencing to better understand the viral infections. (2019-10-25)

Syphilis infection rates in dialysis patients exceed general population
Syphilis rates, like other sexually transmitted disease rates in the United States, are soaring, and the first known study to examine syphilis rates in patients with kidney failure found an incidence greater than three times that of the general population. Neurosyphilis was the second most common syphilis type they found, investigators report in the Clinical Kidney Journal. (2019-10-16)

Why viruses like Herpes and Zika will need to be reclassified, and its biotech impact
New findings reveal many different structural models for viruses, which can eventually lead to developing more targeted antiviral vaccines, by improving our understanding of how viruses form, evolve and infect their hosts. (2019-09-27)

Geometry goes viral: Researchers use maths to solve virus puzzle
A discovery, by researchers at the University of York (UK) and San Diego State University (US), paves the way for new insights into how viruses form, evolve and infect their hosts and may eventually open up new avenues in anti-viral therapy. (2019-09-27)

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